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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: human values

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  • Human Values And Ethics Vs Philisophical Ethics - 1,349 words
    Human Values And Ethics Vs. Philisophical Ethics HUMAN VALUES AND ETHICS VS. PHILIOSOPHICAL ETHICS "They had discussed it, but not deeply, whether they wanted the baby she was now carrying. 'I don't know if I want it,' she said, eyes filling with tears. She cried at anything now, and was often nauseous. That pregnant women cried easily and were nauseous seemed banal to her, and she resented banality" (p. 389 Alice Walker The Abortion). It could sound familiar to many of us. Either in personal life or while discussing and debating, whether during college courses or encircled by close friends, I am sure that each and everyone of us has come across with the issue of abortion, developing a disti ...
    Related: ethics, human history, human life, human values, alice walker
  • Human Values And Ethics Vs Philisophical Ethics - 1,353 words
    ... nature and it's laws. He was arguing that everything in nature operates in conformity with certain rules and standards. More specifically, Kantian personal moral law -- "categorical imperative" says the following: "Act as if the maxim [that is the subjective governing principle] of your action were to become through your will a universal law of nature" (p. 31 Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals). Now, could you imagine what it would be like, if abortion had became 'a universal law of nature?' The existence of human species would come to an end. Therefore, I think that deontologists, based on the facts I've just given, would consider abortion in general as an immoral thing to do. Neve ...
    Related: ethics, human values, catholic church, roman catholic, fetus
  • Brave New World - 510 words
    Brave New World Chemistry is an important key to achieving a world of Community, Identity, and Stability in Aldous Huxleys novel, Brave New World. Huxley himself said that the main theme of his novel is not the advancement of science as such; it is the advancement of science as it affects human individuals. Huxley was obviously rather concerned with the use and misuse of science. As to getting his point of the amazing advancement of science across, Huxley uses a lot of detail in his settings. He uses the decanting process, the conveyor belt at the Hatchery, chemical persuasion, and the new terminology, such as the Bokanovsky Process, involved in just about everything. In a way, I see it as H ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, process involved, human race, advancement
  • Chrysanthemums By Steinbeck Evaluation - 1,612 words
    Chrysanthemums By Steinbeck Evaluation The Chrysanthemums, by John Steinbeck, is set in the beautiful valley of Salinas, California, during a time when California was the land of plenty. A place where dust storms and drought were unheard of, where water was plentiful and the air sprinkled with the sweet smell of fruit blossoms. A time when simple people farm the land and struggle to find a place for themselves in the world. Elisa Allen is at a point in her life where she has begun to realize that her energy and creative drive far exceed what life has offered her. Her husband, Henry Allen, is a well meaning and essentially good man and is quite pleased to be able to make a decent living. Her ...
    Related: chrysanthemums, evaluation, john steinbeck, steinbeck, point of view
  • Env 221y Assignment - 1,539 words
    ENV 221Y Assignment ANICE TRY,@ SAYS TAYLOR ABAD AIR ALERT: IT=S KILLING US!@ Did that catch your attention? The Blue Ribbon Committee=s strategy poses to be quite effective and powerful when trying to make us understand the devastating final consequences to the pollution problem that we encounter every day of our lives. To many of us, knowing that something can kill us, human beings, is such a devastating concept that it seems incomprehensible. Knowing that even one of us can be slaughtered by the air we breathe brings upon us a different kind of insight. One that makes us stop, even for a split second, to think of how we are contributing to the future mass destruction of the human species. ...
    Related: assignment, air pollution, environmental ethics, mass destruction, disagree
  • Environmental Philosophy - 1,117 words
    ... he intersections of choice and the potholes of despair and confusions that we forget what we were racing toward in the first place. For those of us who do take time to stop and think about where we are headed, we realize, as Annie Dillard did, that on the road of life, we may have just lost sight of what we are living for and the origin of where our lives come from. "Wilderness is a human concept an idea about a place and its effect on us. It is a state of mind devoted to an experience and the contemplation of natural places and processes. There is common theme in these wilderness interests," as A. Anderson has suggested. I think of a wilderness as a spot or place in our world in which I ...
    Related: environmental, environmental ethics, philosophy, using animals, animal rights
  • Faa Human Resource - 495 words
    Faa Human Resource HAMPTON UNIVERSITY HAMPTON, VIRGINIA HUMANITIES PROGRAM Exploring Realism, and Romanticism A SHORT PAPER PRESENTED TO MR. OMPOFO & MR. LYONS FOR HUMANITIES 202-05 ENDURING HUMAN VALUES AND CULTURAL CONNECTIONS April 15, 2000 Realism and Romanticism Romanticism dominated the art and culture of the West until almost the last decade of the nineteenth century. The Realist point of view began to form as early as the 1850's. As a start, realism called for an objective and unidealized assessment of everyday life. The word realism is often used in both philosophy and the arts, though in each field the meaning is quite different. In philosophy realism had a different meaning in the ...
    Related: human history, human values, resource, ancient world, modern philosophy
  • Fahrenheit - 621 words
    Fahrenheit 451 Fahrenheit 451 is one of Ray Bradbury's most famous, wonderfully crafted accomplishments. The book was first published in 1933, and its story entails a futuristic world in the middle of a nuclear war. The totalitarian government of this future forbids its people from reading or taking a part in other acts that involve individual thinking. The law against reading is, presumably, fairly new, and the government is faced with the enormous task of destroying all of its citizens' books. This disposal of books is the profession of the main character, Guy Montag, who is officially, titled a "fireman." He and his crew raid libraries and homes, burning any books they find before dozens ...
    Related: fahrenheit, fahrenheit 451, air conditioning, young girl, pocket
  • Human Growth And Development - 1,207 words
    Human Growth And Development Human Growth and Development 1. abusive relationship: when one partner in a relationship becomes violent or aggressive toward the other. 2. accommodation: according to Piaget, changing existing knowledge based on new knowledge. 3. achievement status: identity status in which adolescents have explored alternative identities and are now secure in their chosen identities. 4. active euthanasia: deliberate ending of someones life. 5. activities of daily living (ADLs): self-care tasks such as eating, bathing, toileting, walking, or dressing. 6. activity: dimension of temperament defined by the tempo and vigor of a childs activity. 7. adaptation level: area where enviro ...
    Related: human growth, human values, life cycle, life sciences, amniocentesis
  • Isaiah Berlin - 1,058 words
    Isaiah Berlin Isaiah Berlin became one of our centurys most important political theorists for liberty and liberalism in an age of totalitarianism. He was born in Riga, Latvia in 1909 into a well to do Jewish family. At the age of 12 he moved to Petrograd and experienced first hand the Bolshevik revolution, which would later influence his intellectual ideas about totalitarianism (Gray 3). In 1921 his family moved to London and sent Isaiah to school. His schooling lead him to Oxford where he took a position as philosophy professor in 1931. His English schooling led him to become a disciple of classical liberalism in the English tradition of Mill, Locke, and others (Berger). During World War II ...
    Related: berlin, isaiah, political theory, foreign service, hardy
  • Macbeth Vs Lord Of The Flies - 651 words
    Macbeth Vs. Lord Of The Flies Macbeth vs. Lord of the Flies The human being, according to evolution, has evolved from animals to become a superior animal form that has the ability to decipher right and wrong, have recognizable feelings, and at the same time have that animalistic characteristics wild beasts have. The authors of Macbeth and Lord of the Flies attempt to exhibit the idea that human beings are totally capable of acting like wild beast. The authors explain to us that different factors bring out our animal, or beast, instincts. Envy, fear, and jealousy are factors, which contribute to our regression as savages. Human beings thrive on competition, so, such factors can change the way ...
    Related: flies, lord of the flies, macbeth, call of the wild, human beings
  • Many Economists Agree That There Is A Significant Imbalance Between The Growth Of Global Economy And The Development Of A Fre - 351 words
    Many economists agree that there is a significant imbalance between the growth of global economy and the development of a free society. One of these economists who agrees with this point is George Soros. Soros bases his dilemma mainly on the Thai crisis that hastened the currency meltdown in Asia. Also the Russian collapse inflicted temporary chaos on the Western financial system, and most recently, the volatility of the worlds stock markets has caused most investors much tremor. George Soros argues that in the last 20 years, the emergence of market fundamentalism, that is the idea that markets need only be regulated by the forces of profit and competition, has distorted the role of capital ...
    Related: economists, economy, global economic, global economy, global society, global system, imbalance
  • Nietzsche - 752 words
    Nietzsche Friedrich Nietzsche, a unique philosopher had some very interesting ideas about peoples human values and personality types. In this essay I will explain what I like and dislike about his "Master Morality" & his antithesis to this, "Slave Morality". According to Nietzche, all morality is a manifestation of the will to power. The other is driven by the will to power but attempts to deny this. The term "master morality" refers to all the values of the psychologically strong willed people. They stress independence, personal dignity, self-approval and the will to succeed. For such people "good" refers to whatever leads to self-fulfillment with values such as nobility, strength, courage, ...
    Related: friedrich nietzsche, nietzsche, human race, environment plays, explore
  • Paintings - 864 words
    Paintings Humanities Through the Arts Essay #1 Giotta, 1312: Madonna Enthroned (1st. Painting) Francisco Goya: May 3, 1808 in the Padro, Madrid I found the Giotta, Madonna Enthroned painting to be the most interesting because the power and love the painting displays. The personal values in this particular painting, such as the colors caught my eye because; the colors in this painting are almost bronzed. To me bronzed shows heroism. A very rich colored painting with the golden brown colors mixed with some blues and deeper browns, and just a touch of red gives this particular painting character. It also shows how old this painting is. Another way color works in this painting is the dark, bold, ...
    Related: subject matter, death penalty, human beings, goya, hatred
  • Plato Vs Descartes - 1,507 words
    Plato Vs. Descartes Descartes vs. Plato In the field of philosophy there can be numerous answers to a general question, depending on a particular philosopher's views on the subject. Often times an answer is left undetermined. In the broad sense of the word and also stated in the dictionary philosophy can be described as the pursuit of human knowledge and human values. There are many different people with many different theories of knowledge. Two of these people, also philosophers, in which this paper will go into depth about are Descartes and Plato. Descartes' Meditations on First Philosophy and Plato's The Republic are the topics that are going to be discussed in this paper. In Meditations, ...
    Related: descartes, descartes meditations, knowledge plato, plato, divided line
  • Steinbeck - 923 words
    Steinbeck John Steinbeck A Common Mans Man I never wrote two books alike, once said John Steinbeck (Shaw, 10). That may be true, but I think that he wrote many of his novels and short stories based on many of the same views. He often focused on social problems, like the haves verses the have nots, and made the reader want to encourage the underdog. Steinbecks back ground and concern for the common man made him one of the best writers for human rights. John Steinbeck was born in Salians, California and spent most of his life there or around Salians, because of that he often modeled his stories and the characters around the land he loved and the experiences he encountered. He lived in Salians ...
    Related: john steinbeck, steinbeck, of mice and men, social groups, cannery
  • The Crucible: Literal Vs Literary - 1,068 words
    The Crucible: Literal Vs. Literary Arthur Millers famous drama The Crucible, a tale of how accusations and lies ruinously impact a whole community, is very aptly titled. By definition, a crucible is a severe test, and the challenges faced by Millers characters are many. The historical events dramatized in the play reflect how core human values, including truth, justice and love, are tested under life and death conditions. The trials of the characters and the values they hold dearly come when their simple, ordered world ceases to be black and white and easily deciphered, and is turned upside down in the gray shade of ambiguity. A major test in The Crucible is found in how the household of Joh ...
    Related: literal, book reports, reverend hale, elizabeth proctor, demons
  • The Iroquois And The Us Constitution - 1,011 words
    ... le at the end of the American Revolution. However, the consequent peace was to create even more devastation then the war had done. Land was taken indiscriminately from former allies such as the Onedas and Tuscaroras, as well as from the tribes that had supported the British. It is interesting that the ideas of the Iroquois confederacy serve as examples both far the democratic societies as well as for the communist both of the world's major ideology seem to attempting to recapture, through theories and various institution, the spirit of the Iroquois confederacy. America tries to gain liberty through political institutions, while the communist countries are trying to accomplish their goal ...
    Related: constitution, iroquois, iroquois confederacy, states constitution, united states constitution
  • The Life Of Jonas Salk - 616 words
    The Life of Jonas Salk In America in the 1950s, summertime was a time of fear and anxiety for many parents; this was the season when children by the thousands became infected with the crippling disease poliomyelitis, or polio. This burden of fear was lifted forever when it was announced that Dr. Jonas Salk had developed a vaccine against the disease. Salk became world-famous overnight, but his discovery was the result of many years of painstaking research. Jonas Salk was born in New York City. His parents were Russian-Jewish immigrants who, although they themselves lacked formal education, were determined to see their children succeed, and encouraged them to study hard. Jonas Salk was the fi ...
    Related: jonas, jonas salk, salk, medical school, medical science
  • The Western Lowland Gorilla: - 1,591 words
    The Western Lowland Gorilla: The Western Lowland Gorilla: A comparison with humans and a critique of methods of study. By Fokren Masters For thousands of years, men and women have strived to explain the why of their existence. To discover the reasons for how we act the way we do and what this knowledge can do to impact the way we live our lives in this complex society that we have created. One of the ways that science has begun to shed light on the inner workings of the human condition is through Primatology. Built from the words Primate which refers to a group of animals closely related to humans and logos which is a Greek word meaning the study of Primatologys goals include more than simpl ...
    Related: natural history, men and women, york columbia, american, evolutionary
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