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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: human nature

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  • Adventurism In Human Nature - 843 words
    Adventurism In Human Nature Human history is littered with example where a few individual risked life and limbs to venture into the unknown, which then came to be discovered, thanks to their spirit of adventurism or as some would say, fool hardy bravado. Of course, certain names come to mind, Christopher Columbus, Captain James Cook, Lois and Clark etc. There is another side to this tale of fame as well. Even the success stories sometimes had a ring of failure about itself. A person might be a pioneer in the field of discovery but the fruits of his labor are enjoyed by those who follow him. He might in fact have served as an expendable instrument in the road to discovery, in the big schemes ...
    Related: human history, human nature, human spirit, to build a fire, captain james cook
  • Human Nature - 1,424 words
    Human Nature Is there or is there not human nature? For Charles Darwin the answer is no. Darwin was the first to introduce the concept of evolution. He believed that humans evolved from the ape and not in the image of God. Darwin contradicted Aristotle's view that man has a purpose in life -to reason. For Darwin, man has no purpose. According to Darwin, man began as one of a few species on this planet, fighting for survival. Man was better equipped with certain traits that allowed him to pass through the filters of natural selection. Man's physical and intellectual traits allowed him to surpass all over species, thus becoming the greatest predator and severely diminishing the risk of man bec ...
    Related: human beings, human condition, human nature, human personality, human population
  • Human Nature - 341 words
    Human Nature My belief about human nature is best summarized by the thoughts of Fr. Montaigne. I think that the idea that man is a hypocritical and contradictory is a true idea. All people, whether they like it or not, have opposing characteristics. These undesirable attributes are prevailing in everybody. Not one person, of reasonable intelligence, can truthfully say that they have never lied. Even, if they are mostly truthful, there is time in everybodys life that a lie, a falsehood, an untruth is present. It would be ignorant to say that one single person is immune from the trait. Also with the example of being clever and stupid. Both qualifications are present in a persons life within an ...
    Related: human nature, more important, stupid, undesirable
  • Human Nature, Some Say Its What Elevates Us To A Higher Plain Of Conciseness, What Separates Us From Animals Others, However, - 578 words
    Human nature, some say its what elevates us to a higher plain of conciseness, what separates us from animals. Others, however, say that human nature is the exact thing that holds us back, keeps us from evolving. Man is such a complex animal, full of contradictions and inconsistencies; it seems impossible for us to fully understand its nature. But to unlock the secrets of human nature is to discover the origins of both good and evil. So, never the less, we try because if we ever want to move forward we need to know what is driving us. The human mind is full of vast extremes. It possesses the capacity for unconditional love; yet at the same time it is capable of blind hatred. Its this actualit ...
    Related: human mind, human nature, plain, food chain, good and evil
  • Law: An Overview Human Nature Consists Of Three Basic Components These Are To Live, To Propagate And To Dominate If Humanity - 981 words
    LAW: an Overview Human nature consists of three basic components. These are to live, to propagate and to dominate. If Humanity was left without any other parameters, this natural state of existence would govern its behavior. Fortunately, there are parameters that exist. These parameters are law. The topic of this paper addresses the type of law that operates in creating potential boundaries for the behavior of states. This law is called the Law of Nations or international law. Patrick Moynihan, a senator from New York, has written a book on this subject called On the Law of Nations. His book argues that states need international law to monitor their actions and to maintain order. He also not ...
    Related: dominate, human nature, humanity, overview, international law
  • Les Miserables How Society Affects Human Nature - 803 words
    Les Miserables - How Society Affects Human Nature In Les Miserables, Victor Hugo portrays human nature in a neutral state. Humans are born with neither good nor bad instincts, but rather society affects our actions and thoughts. Hugo portrays the neutral state of mind through Jean Valjean and Cosette. The two extremes of good and evil are represented through Thnardier and the bishop. Good and evil coexists in the society and affects Valjean and Cosette. It is the two extremes of good and evil that dictate the lives of Valjean and Cosette. The bishop represents charity and love. Everything he's ever had, he gave to charity. When the bishop first met Valjean, he said, "You need not tell me who ...
    Related: human nature, les miserables, victor hugo, self esteem, poverty
  • Oedipus A Victom Of His Own Human Nature - 1,264 words
    Oedipus - A Victom Of His Own Human Nature What you don't know won't hurt you. This widely popular piece of advice directly applies to Oedipus. Unfortunately for Oedipus, he is incapable of following such advice. The story begins with the murder of Laius already in the past. As Oedipus learns of Laius's death, he pursues knowledge of the tragedy and tries to expose the murderer to no end. It is inevitable that Oedipus finds out that it was he who has killed Laius, his father. Oedipus is a man of swift action and great insight. At the opening of Oedipus the King, we see that these qualities make him an excellent ruler who anticipates his subjects' needs. When the citizens of Thebes beg him to ...
    Related: human nature, oedipus, oedipus the king, free will, tragic hero
  • The Roots Of Human Nature Are Sunk Deep Into Our History And Experiences When In Our Own Lives We Are To Find The Basis Of Ou - 685 words
    The roots of human nature are sunk deep into our history and experiences. When in our own lives we are to find the basis of our human nature, we must look to our early years, the formative years. Now take for example if we placed a newborn in the wild or in a high-class, well-mannered, wealthy family. The human nature of the newborn in the wild will be exactly that, wild and chaotic. While on the other hand the newborn in the well-mannered society will be well mannered and moralistic. Human nature is defined by the values that are taught and the values that society defines, if there are no societal values, human nature is doomed and lessened to that of wolves. Society defines the values and ...
    Related: history, human beings, human nature, human society, good and evil
  • The Theme Of The Outsiders Human Nature - 526 words
    The Theme of The Outsiders Human Nature The Outsiders, an enthralling tale by S.E. Hinton, is an excellent story about the hardships and triumphs experienced by the Greasers and the Socs, two rival gangs. This novel suggests the stories content because the Greasers are a gang of social outcasts and misfits. This novels theme is very specific; people, no matter what their social background, strive for the same goals and experience the same disappointments. This novel shows this theme throughout a detailed story line. The fictional novel is set in a moderate-size city, possibly near Texas, in the late 1960s. Ponyboy, the main character, lives with his brothers as a greaser. One day Ponyboy and ...
    Related: human nature, outsiders, main character, everyday life, texas
  • True Human Nature Criticism Of Lord Of The Flies - 891 words
    True Human Nature (Criticism of Lord of the Flies) Reading Lord of the Flies, one gets quite an impression of Goldings view on human nature. Whether this view is right or wrong, true or not, is a point to be debated. This image Golding paints for the reader, that of humans being inherently bad, is a perspective not all people share. This opinion, in fact, is a point that many have disagreed with when reading his work. There are many instances throughout Lord of the Flies that state Goldings opinion suggesting an evil human nature. Each of these instances are the bricks holding together his fortress of ideas that are constantly under attack. Lord of the Flies is but an abstract tool of Goldin ...
    Related: criticism, flies, human nature, lord of the flies, holy bible
  • When John Stienbeck Translated The Tales Of King Arthur He Realized That He Needed To Maintain The Elements Of Human Nature T - 385 words
    When John Stienbeck translated the tales of King Arthur he realized that he needed to maintain the elements of human nature that appeared through out the original stories. There are many examples of human nature in the sections of the book that we have read, there are good and bad aspects of human nature portrayed through the book and I will only mention a few. One example is when King Arthur tells the Lady of the Lake that he will do anything that she wants in exchange for the sword Excalibur. It is human nature to be quick to promise things when there is something important to us in exchange. We are more likely to do what ever it takes in order to get something we really "need". It is very ...
    Related: arthur, human nature, king arthur, legal system, good thing
  • 1899 - 582 words
    1/8/99 Lord of The Flies Three major themes in this story were: fear, the need for civilization, and instinct to be a follower. The most obvious of all the themes is man's need for civilization. The total opposite of the belief that man is innocent and society is evil is displayed in the story by showing that laws and rules, schools and policemen are all important to keep the dark side of human nature in line. When these concepts are ignored or slip away then we go back to the earliest part of their nature. An example of this is when the boys on the island get together at the beginning of the story and try to set some rules and assign a leader. This does not work out the way Ralph had expect ...
    Related: human nature, major themes, different ways, assign, impression
  • 1984 - 1,513 words
    1984 Nineteen Eighty-Four is a compelling novel, written in the period just after W.W.II. It details the life of one man, Winston Smith, and his struggles with an undoubtedly fascist government. The book is set approximately in the year 1984, in which Winston's society is ruled by a governing force known as The Party. At the head of this government is a fictional figure known as Big Brother, to whom all citizens must love and respect. In this society, privacy and freedom do not exist. People are constantly monitored by telescreens, and subjected to a constant barrage of propaganda. Any devious thought or action is dealt with by cruel and deadly punishment. Winston is a worker in one of the g ...
    Related: 1984, government agencies, specific purpose, big brother, history
  • 65279 It Is Unusual When A Masterpiece Develops Out Of An Assignment, But That Is, More Or Less, What - 1,904 words
    It is unusual when a masterpiece develops out of an assignment, but that is, more or less, what happened in the case of Gullivers Travels. The Martinus Scriblerus Club proposed to satirize the follies and vices of learned, scientific and modern men. Each of the members was given a topic, and Swifts was to satirize the numerous and popular volumes describing voyages to faraway lands. Ten years passed between the Scriblerus project and the publication of Gullivers Travels, but when Swift finished, he had completed a definitive work in travel literature. Moreover, he had completed what was to become a childrens classic (in its abridged form) and a satiric masterpiece. Swifts main character, Gul ...
    Related: masterpiece, unusual, make sense, time passes, principal
  • A Brave New World - 976 words
    A Brave New World A Personal Utopia: An Analysis of a Key Passage in Brave New World The key passage of Aldous Huxleys Brace New World takes place after John has been arrested and is a conversation with Mond. When John and Mond speak of ideal societies, a major part of Brave New World, the aspect of human nature which makes us search continuously for our personal Utopia, becomes apparent. In Monds study, the sacrifices each character makes in order to find a Utopia are interconnected. The search for a personal Utopia reveals Huxleys view on human nature of sacrificing everything to live with self-fulfillment. The connection of the sacrifices each character makes is shown in the study, helpin ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, ideal society, book reports, intelligence
  • A Comparison And Contrast Of Lord Of The Flies And Heart Of Darkness - 398 words
    A Comparison and Contrast of Lord of the Flies and Heart of Darkness Achebe uses positive tone in his description of the African jungle; whereas, Conrad makes use of negative connotations. Their portrayals of the jungle reflect their attitudes toward their subject; Achebe sees it as a hospitable home whereas Conrad sees a tragic trap. Conrad utilizes words with negative connotations, such as Arioted, Amob, Avengeful, and Agloom to portray the jungle as an inauspicious place. He makes use of diction such as, "Whether it meant war, peace, or prayer we could not tell..." to further portray the jungle as an Aunknown planet," a place of hostile unfamiliarity. Conrad feels the "white man's burden" ...
    Related: comparison, contrast, darkness, flies, heart of darkness, lord of the flies
  • A Comparison Of Macbeth And Crime And Punishment - 1,336 words
    A Comparison of Macbeth and Crime and Punishment Shakespeares Macbeth and Dostoevskys Crime and Punishment explore the psychological depths of man. These two works examine tragedy as represented through the existential beliefs of many philosophers. Existentialist theory expresses the idea that man can satisfy his own needs, regardless of social codes, if he has the energy and ambition to act. Both Macbeth and Raskolnikov have the ambition to act, but each struggles internally with their actions, frightened of the consequences. Although these works examine the tragedy and remorse of Macbeth and Raskolnikov, the idea of a driving force within each character remains evident. Ultimately, William ...
    Related: comparison, crime, crime and punishment, macbeth, punishment
  • A Holy Nation - 1,915 words
    A Holy Nation A Holy Nation After creating the world, a paradise for human kind, God is forced to banish Adam and Eve because they disobey His orders to not eat fruit from the tree of wisdom. This results ultimately in the fall of man to earth. Immediately from the beginning of his time on Earth, man chooses not to follow the path set before him by God but instead spreads evil throughout the world. Therefore, the inherent problem humans face is the pressure to judge between good and evil, the need to aspire to be like God. God's first solution to this problem was to flood the world killing everyone, but those on Noah's arch. God realizes, however, that this is not an answer to the problem th ...
    Related: holy, men and women, growing old, good and evil, pivotal
  • A Mind Is The Slave Of Passion Through Its Own Choice - 1,719 words
    A Mind Is The Slave Of Passion Through Its Own Choice While he may best be remembered for his classic autobiography Confessions, St. Augustine was also the author of The Problem of Free Choice, which raises many questions and provides answers for a plethora of questions regarding human life and the ability to think. He titles one of the sections of his book A Mind is the Slave of Passion Through its Own Choice (MS). In this section, he reveals many interesting thoughts on human nature through dialogue between two characters, Augustine and Evodious. (E. and A.) St. Augustine looks to discuss reason, knowledge, the concept of mind and control over it, and passion. The conclusion that is reache ...
    Related: free choice, human mind, passion, slave, st. augustine
  • Abortion Prolife View - 1,104 words
    ... oved by God who has a distinct plan for their lives. It denies the child the right to live and society the privilege of the childs gift and contributions to the world. "God hears the new life in the womb, the heart within the heart, the anguish cry of hostage child sobbing in the dark." Many times after having an abortion, a woman will become emotionally unstable. Post-abortion syndrome describes the trauma of the woman who finally feels guilty, understands the repercussions of her actions, and regrets her previous decision. Statistics show that 92% feel less in touch with their emotions or feel a need to suppress their emotions. 82% had greater feelings of loneliness or isolation and 86 ...
    Related: abortion, human nature, moral responsibility, senate judiciary committee, rage
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