Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: human mind

  • 188 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • Computers Mimic The Human Mind - 1,461 words
    Computers Mimic The Human Mind Computers Mimic The Human Mind The mind-body problem has captivated the minds of philosophers for centuries. The problem is how the body and mind can interact with each other if they are separate and distinct. One solution to the problem is to replace any mental term with a more accurate physical description. Eliminative Materialists take this idea to the extreme by stating that everything that is believed to be mental will someday be explained in terms of the physical world. One way that people try to prove Eliminative Materialism to be true is through technology. Certainly if we are able to create computers and software that mimic the human mind, then Elimina ...
    Related: computer program, computers, human beings, human brain, human mind
  • Philosophy Of The Human Mind: Truth - 1,310 words
    Philosophy Of The Human Mind: Truth TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. THE PHILOSOPHICAL CONCEPT OF TRUTH 2. THE ACHIEVEMENT OF TRUTH 1. THE PHILOSOPHICAL CONCEPT OF TRUTH Epistemology is the study of what we know, how we know, and what we can or cannot know. In Epistemology, students are asked many questions about Truth and Knowledge. Here are two basic questions that students may be asked, What is Truth? and Can we really have Truth? The simple answer to this question is yes. Truth, in a philosophical term is defined as What the universe actually is not what one thinks it is or is not. An opinion in philosophy does not count. Good philosophers must be able to reason to others what they claiming are true ...
    Related: human mind, philosophy, good thing, real world, philosopher
  • Philosophy Of The Human Mind: Truth - 1,279 words
    ... we know that we cannot see or hear things that other animals can, is something very useful to us. With technology and science, we can build devices that will let us see and hear things that we may never see or hear. Furthermore, You must know that there are certain things that we may never know about the universe. What we have to do is reason with others what we are claiming is true. Metaphysics is one branch of philosophy that deals with restrictions. If you are majoring in philosophy, this is one of the branches of philosophy in which you must learn. Metaphysics, to put it, is the basic of Philosophy. Understanding where to draw the line is one of the keys in doing philosophy. There a ...
    Related: human mind, philosophy, people believe, immanuel kant, philosophical
  • The Novel 1984 By George Orwell Is An American Classic That Explores The Human Mind When It Comes To Power, Corruption, Contr - 712 words
    The novel 1984 by George Orwell is an American classic that explores the human mind when it comes to power, corruption, control, and the negative-utopian society. Imagine living in a "world of monstrous machines and terrifying weapons. Warriors fighting, triumphing, persecuting...three million people all with the same face,"(64) and there is the world of 1984, frightening, grotesque, and completely controlled by the ruling Party. Winston Smith is an insignificant member of the ruling Party, in the nation of Oceania. Everywhere Winston goes, even his own home, he is watched through telescreens, and everywhere he looks he sees the face of the Party's omniscient leader, the figure known only as ...
    Related: 1984, american, american classic, classic, george orwell, human mind, orwell
  • 1984 - 957 words
    1984 1984 The story 1984, by George Orwell, is set in the fictional country Oceania, in what is thought to be the year 1984, which consists of the Americas, the British Isles, Australia and part of Africa. The part of Oceania in which 1984 takes place is referred to as Air Strip One and is formerly England. Winston, the protagonist of the story, is faced with a conflict of extreme hatred against the ultimate antagonist, Big Brother. Big Brother is the leader of the political party of Oceania who controls not only actions, but also thoughts through the thought police and what are called "telescreens." Winston falls in love with a girl by the name of Julia, and the two of them must decide on w ...
    Related: 1984, point of view, big brother, official language, brien
  • 1984 Abstract - 616 words
    1984 Abstract Book Review of 1984 (5/97) One year before his death in 1950, George Orwell published a book entitled 1984. Since then, the novel has become a bible to people all over the world. The enthusiasm is not only due to the fact that the novel is written so eloquently, and with such foresight, but also because it makes a bold statement about humanity. 1984s main character is Winston Smith, a man who doubts the righteousness of the totalitarian government (Big Brother) that rules Oceania, one of three superstates in the world of 1984. We begin the book with Winston, and learn that Big Brother is quite fictional. The government has developed its own language, is at constant war with the ...
    Related: 1984, abstract, book review, george orwell, stark
  • A Comparison Of Judaism, Islam, Christianity - 1,507 words
    A Comparison Of Judaism, Islam, & Christianity Religion is one of the driving forces behind many of the events and attitudes that have shaped our world. Throughout the centuries, laws have been enacted; cities and countries have been created and destroyed; and wars have been fought, all to promulgate or protect one religion or another. This paper will examine aspects of the three major Western religions of the world: Judaism, Islam, and Christianity. Topics covered will include the origin of all three religions, the view of God held by each tradition, and conflicts. Several of the beliefs of these religions will be examined, such as judgment, and the Trinity. Origin of Judaism The origins of ...
    Related: christianity, christianity and islam, christianity religion, comparison, great religions
  • A Mind Is The Slave Of Passion Through Its Own Choice - 1,719 words
    A Mind Is The Slave Of Passion Through Its Own Choice While he may best be remembered for his classic autobiography Confessions, St. Augustine was also the author of The Problem of Free Choice, which raises many questions and provides answers for a plethora of questions regarding human life and the ability to think. He titles one of the sections of his book A Mind is the Slave of Passion Through its Own Choice (MS). In this section, he reveals many interesting thoughts on human nature through dialogue between two characters, Augustine and Evodious. (E. and A.) St. Augustine looks to discuss reason, knowledge, the concept of mind and control over it, and passion. The conclusion that is reache ...
    Related: free choice, human mind, passion, slave, st. augustine
  • A Philosopher Of Nature - 1,482 words
    A Philosopher Of Nature A PHILOSOPHER OF NATURE December 1, 1998 Paper # 2 Intro to Philosophy Fifty years ago the single greatest philosopher walked upon this earth. How can I be so dauntless as to refer to one man as The Greatest philosopher? The answer is simple. All philosophers ask questions. Few of these questions will produce earth-shattering revelations and even fewer will change the world. Out of the handful of philosophers who have made a difference in the world I can think of only one who has, by use of an amazing mind and knowledge of complex mathematics, changed the world forever. Albert Einstein was born in Ulm Germany on March 14, 1879, and spent his youth in Munich, where his ...
    Related: philosopher, franklin d roosevelt, general theory, second world, fascination
  • Absurd - 1,347 words
    Absurd Theatre Influences on Theatre of the Absurd Big feet, stampeding rhinoceroses, and barren sets are typical of the theatre of the absurd. The dramatic content, symbolism, and spectacles are an amazing thing to see and an impossibility to comprehend. The philosophy of the absurd and the dawn of mankind influenced these plays in the twentieth century. The main proponents and works of the theater of the absurd and philosophy were influenced by the chaotic actions of the early and mid-twentieth century. These chaotic actions led them to search for something in literature and drama never seen before. A brief survey of the main proponents and works of the absurd philosophy and theater can le ...
    Related: absurd, human life, north africa, political power, cycle
  • Allegory Of Cave Not Essaylots Of Info - 2,868 words
    ... SS. HE COULD NOT UNDER THESE CIRCUMSTANCES COMPETE VERY EFFECTIVELY WITH THE OTHER PRISONERS IN MAKING OUT THE SHADOWS ON THE WALL. WHILE HIS EYESIGHT WAS STILL DIM AND UNSTEADY, THOSE WHO HAD THEIR PERMANENT RESIDENCE IN THE DARKNESS COULD WIN EVERY ROUND OF COMPETITION WITH HIM. THEY WOULD AT FIRST FIND THIS SITUATION VERY AMUSING AND WOULD TAUNT HIM BY SAYING THAT HIS SIGHT WAS PERFECTLY ALL RIGHT BEFORE HE WENT UP OUT OF THE CAVE AND THAT NOW HE HAS RETURNED WITH HIS SIGHT RUINED. THEIR CONCLUSION WOULD BE THAT IT IS NOT WORTH TRYING TO GO UP OUT OF THE CAVE. INDEED, SAYS PLATO IF THEY COULD LAY HANDS ON THE MAN WHO WAS TRYING TO SET THEM FREE AND LEAD THEM UP THEY WOULD KILL HIM. MO ...
    Related: allegory, allegory of the cave, cave, info, human beings
  • American Scholar By Ralph Waldo Emerson - 544 words
    American Scholar By Ralph Waldo Emerson The American Scholar by Ralph Waldo Emerson In the essay the American Scholar, Emerson portrays the scholar as a person who learns from three main things. These things by which a scholar is educated are by nature, by books (the past) and by action. Emerson uses nature as a comparison to the human mind where he states, "There is never a beginning, there is never an end to the inexplicable continuity of this web of God, but always circular power returning into itself."(296) The human mind is an object that is boundless and can be full of so much beauty and intellect such as nature can be. Emerson continues to explain how classification begins among the y ...
    Related: american, american scholar, emerson, ralph, ralph waldo, ralph waldo emerson, scholar
  • An Essay About The Scarlet Letter, Finding Ones Own Truth - 626 words
    An Essay About The Scarlet Letter, Finding One's Own Truth The Scarlet Letter Nathaniel Hawthorne uses diction and symbolism to show the negative effects of stifling conformity verses the positive empowerment found in embarrassing ones own truth. He tries to impress upon his readers that an outsider whether from another physical location, or simply someone who thinks and acts outside that societys definition of acceptable behavior can in fact facilitate positive change within that society regardless of the generation or society. The secret in this novel most likely represents an idea, privacy, or even social censure. The Mary-like character Hester Prynne represents feminism, as the female-he ...
    Related: scarlet, scarlet letter, the scarlet letter, nathaniel hawthorne, worlds apart
  • Angels - 1,694 words
    Angels Angels Around our pillows golden ladders rise, And up and down the skies, With winged sandals shod, The angels come and go, The messengers of God! ~Richard Henry Stoddard~ Angelos, AYN jul, are both words that mean angel. This goes to show that angels are widespread though out the world. Beliefs and ideas on angels are common among a variety of people in many places and within many religions. As to what a true angel is, in definition, is undecided. Whether there really are angels is the supreme question. The idea of an angel dates back to the 5th century to the religion of Zoroastrianism. Angels were mere agents of a supreme deity. It was believed that there were six archangels who gu ...
    Related: fallen angels, guardian angel, hebrew scriptures, divine love, jews
  • Appleget 1 - 1,066 words
    Appleget 1 Joseph Appleget Mr. Helle/ IB English 12 10/18/00 The Way We Live Our Lives In our individual routines, each and every one of us strives to be the best that we are capable of being. How peculiar this is; we aim for similar goals, yet the methods we enact are unique. Just as no two people have the same fingerprint, no two have identical theories on how to live life. While some follow religious outlines to aspire to a level of oral excellence, others pursue different approaches. Toward the end of the Nineteenth-Century and on through the mid-Twentieth, a movement followed existentialism, a philosophical theory of life, in order to achieve such a level. Even though the idea of existe ...
    Related: nineteenth century, jean paul, ethical standards, insect, comprehend
  • Artificial Intelligence - 1,339 words
    ... , typically use Boolean logic to process input from an individual user and employs stored rules to generate a prediction or suggestion. A prime example of this usage is the "Office Assistant" which is included with Microsoft's Office 97 software package. This assistant is extremely useful for the individual who is unfamiliar with the software package. If the user seems to be floundering around looking for a way to accomplish a task, the assistant will attempt to interpret the desires of the user by looking at what he as been doing and then tries to make an educated guess as to what he wants to do. Then the assistant will display a help menu to guide the user through the desired course of ...
    Related: artificial, artificial intelligence, intelligence, american express, knowledge base
  • Artificial Intelligence - 2,507 words
    Artificial Intelligence Artificial Intelligence is based in the view that the only way to prove you know the mind's causal properties is to build it. In its purest form, AI research seeks to create an automaton possessing human intellectual capabilities and eventually, consciousness. There is no current theory of human consciousness which is widely accepted, yet AI pioneers like Hans Moravec enthusiastically postulate that in the next century, machines will either surpass human intelligence, or human beings will become machines themselves (through a process of scanning the brain into a computer). Those such as Moravec, who see the eventual result as "the universe extending to a single thinki ...
    Related: artificial, artificial intelligence, human intelligence, intelligence, philosophical views
  • Artificial Intelligence - 2,507 words
    Artificial Intelligence Artificial Intelligence is based in the view that the only way to prove you know the mind's causal properties is to build it. In its purest form, AI research seeks to create an automaton possessing human intellectual capabilities and eventually, consciousness. There is no current theory of human consciousness which is widely accepted, yet AI pioneers like Hans Moravec enthusiastically postulate that in the next century, machines will either surpass human intelligence, or human beings will become machines themselves (through a process of scanning the brain into a computer). Those such as Moravec, who see the eventual result as "the universe extending to a single thinki ...
    Related: artificial, artificial intelligence, human intelligence, intelligence, alan turing
  • Artificial Intelligence - 2,508 words
    Artificial Intelligence Artificial Intelligence is based in the view that the only way to prove you know the mind's causal properties is to build it. In its purest form, AI research seeks to create an automaton possessing human intellectual capabilities and eventually, consciousness. There is no current theory of human consciousness which is widely accepted, yet AI pioneers like Hans Moravec enthusiastically postulate that in the next century, machines will either surpass human intelligence, or human beings will become machines themselves (through a process of scanning the brain into a computer). Those such as Moravec, who see the eventual result as the universe extending to a single thinkin ...
    Related: artificial, artificial intelligence, human intelligence, intelligence, carnegie mellon university
  • Artificial Intelligence - 2,478 words
    ... -language, through syntax, that we construct our world. This is the essence of Chomsky's constructivism. So we see that if we are to construct a thinking machine (or for that matter, representations in our mind of a thinking machine) this broad syntax does significantly clarify how to go about designing a computer which can take discourse as input, remember and learn, etc. . .If we realize however the syntactic nature of the minds which create the machine, we can see that it is possible for a machine to think syntactically, or at least that Searle's Chinese Room argument does not stand up, because cognition is not dependent on semantics. Thus, a thinking machine would be a purely syntact ...
    Related: artificial, artificial intelligence, human intelligence, intelligence, human race
  • 188 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>

To the top

Example research papers produced by our company:

We write: custom term papers, custom essay writing, admission essays, persuasive and argumentative essays, critical essays, dissertations and theses

Research paper topics, free essays: idaho, news network, pathos, etc.

Copyright © 2002-2018 PromptPapers.com. All rights reserved.