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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: human history

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  • 51000 - 994 words
    5/10/00 Globalization and Ideal Landscapes Globalization is a broad term that has several meanings to different factions, cultural Groups and nations. For our purposes globalization refers to the loss of time and space through the rapid development of technologies. It also refers to a world in which all nations and peoples are directly or indirectly connected through the international economy and world politics. This rapid trend toward a globalized world has seen supporters from both the first world financial sectors and the mass producing agricultural sector. Its main detractors have been environmentalists and the indigenous peoples who are adversely affected by the encroaching nature of gl ...
    Related: point of view, computers and the internet, indigenous people, landscape, supporters
  • Adolf Hitler - 1,870 words
    Adolf Hitler For the past week I have been researching three men, Joseph Stalin, Mao, and Adolf Hitler for an answer to a question; who is the most evil? Which, means that I had to think about what exactly was evil for me. Now the dictionary they have a simple definition for it, which is: morally reprehensible, sinful, wicked. But there could be so many different meanings, because there are many different people in the world. So, these three men were judged on my definition of evil. Evil to me is someone who consciously knows what there doing but still doesnt care, someone who purposely tries to cause destruction on other people, one who possibly thinks that they are somewhat of a messiah, a ...
    Related: adolf, adolf hitler, hitler, vienna hitler, right to vote
  • Adventurism In Human Nature - 843 words
    Adventurism In Human Nature Human history is littered with example where a few individual risked life and limbs to venture into the unknown, which then came to be discovered, thanks to their spirit of adventurism or as some would say, fool hardy bravado. Of course, certain names come to mind, Christopher Columbus, Captain James Cook, Lois and Clark etc. There is another side to this tale of fame as well. Even the success stories sometimes had a ring of failure about itself. A person might be a pioneer in the field of discovery but the fruits of his labor are enjoyed by those who follow him. He might in fact have served as an expendable instrument in the road to discovery, in the big schemes ...
    Related: human history, human nature, human spirit, to build a fire, captain james cook
  • Anarchism And Liberalism - 1,399 words
    ... st groups to represent the labor force, minority groups, and any apathetic and helpless citizens. The presence of sub-government groups, such as big industry, are recognized as being insufficient in representing the public's interest and so the liberals call for more regulations to control these sub-governments from abusing their power. This goes right along with the whole philosophy of contemporary liberals in that they don't want to start over and rebuild the government, but rather reform it and ad more regulations to control it. The idea of a ruler goes against the basic stance of anarchism. Proudhon best describes this view when he said, "Whoever puts his hand on me to govern me is u ...
    Related: anarchism, contemporary liberalism, liberalism, free society, individual rights
  • Animal Farm - 662 words
    Animal Farm Social commentary is sometimes found at the heart of good art, whether that art form is literature or popular music. The novel, Animal Farm by George Orwell, and the rock album, Animals written and performed by Pink Floyd share the same characteristic of scathing social commentary. The artworks also share an animal metaphor that serves to cast a dark light on human social interactions and stratification functions. Conversely, the artworks individually attack the diametrically opposed, socio-economic systems of communism (by Orwell) and capitalism (by Roger Waters). The artworks are individually astounding, but when viewed in tandem, alludes to the idea that socio-economic systems ...
    Related: animal farm, farm, soviet union, human history, ineffective
  • Animal Farm: The Fable, The Satire, The Allegory - 1,235 words
    Animal Farm: The Fable, The Satire, The Allegory Animal Farm, by George Orwell, is a fable about rulers and the ruled, oppressors and the oppressed, and an idea betrayed. The particular meaning given will depend partly on the political beliefs- "political" in the deepest sense of the word. The book is there to be enjoyed about how human beings can best live together in this world. The novel, Animal Farm by George Orwell, successfully combines the characteristics of three literary forms- the fable, the satire and the allegory. Animal Farm could be called "A Fairy Story" because people think of the fairy story as the escapist form of literature par excellence. Animal Farm has sometimes been re ...
    Related: allegory, animal farm, old major, human history, bolsheviks
  • Aztec Nation - 2,989 words
    ... e would be told that he would be a warrior whose mission was to feed the Sun with the blood of enemies and if the infant was a girl she was to spend her days doing household chores and help the family. In about four days the father would call an astrologer to read the child's horoscope and determine the appropriate day for the naming ceremony. After a naming ceremony, the name was announced and the news was spread by little boys who ran through the streets shouting. Each child had a calendrical name taken from the day of birth and also a personal name which belonged to him alone(Bray 1969). Education was considered extremely important. Even from an infant to age four the child was taught ...
    Related: aztec, aztec empire, aztec gods, aztec religion, book encyclopedia
  • Bahai Faith - 1,126 words
    Baha'i Faith The Bah' Faith The Bah' Faith proclaims itself to be the youngest of the independent world religions. Its roots stem from Iran during the mid-nineteenth century. This new faith is primarily based on the founder, Bah'u'llh, meaning 'the Glory of God'. Bah's (the believers) in many places around the world have been heavily persecuted for their beliefs and differences and have been branded by many as a cult, a reform movement and/or a sect of the Muslim religion. The Bah' Faith is unique in that it accepts the teachings of what they believe to be all the divine messengers, these are Abraham, Moses, Zoroaster, the Buddha, Jesus and Muhammad. The faith believes each messenger is equa ...
    Related: bahai, armed forces, world religions, human history, philosophical
  • Bill Gates - 592 words
    Bill Gates William H. Gates Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Microsoft Corporation William (Bill) H. Gates is chairman and chief executive officer of Microsoft Corporation, the leading provider, worldwide, of software for the personal computer. and employs more than 20,000 people in 48 countries. Born on October 28, 1955, Gates and his two sisters grew up in Seattle. Their father, William H. Gates II, is a Seattle attorney. Their late mother, Mary Gates, was a schoolteacher, University of Washington regent and chairwoman of United Way International. Gates attended public elementary school and the private Lakeside School. There, he began his career in personal computer software, programmi ...
    Related: bill gates, programming language, harvard university, computer software, provider
  • Birth Of Communication - 2,409 words
    ... the world was looking at America wondering what it would do next. As communication helped the word spread about this "land of opportunity" more and more people wanted to immigrate, or at least come to America to see what all the talk was about. Many Chinese and Japanese came to the United States and saw it first hand from the 1860's on (Iriye, 39). For the Chinese the personal meeting did not make as grand of an impression as it did for the Japanese. For example, the Japanese were almost desperately interested in learning more about the military strength and power that the West held. However, the Chinese government was perfectly happy with maintaining their status quo. Although it is dif ...
    Related: cultural communication, intercultural communication, international communication, cultural imperialism, greenwood press
  • Burial Ceremonialism - 1,134 words
    Burial Ceremonialism Throughout the course of human history, anthropological findings have assisted archeologists in creating an excellent archeological record. Findings such as burial ceremonialism and certain behaviors that accompany this humanlike ritual are factors that may aid archeologists in the creation of past records. Through the ritual of burial ceremonialism of our ancestors we are able to determine certain behaviors that may have been expressed by the participants. Such examples are our ancestors view of death, its significance, and the mere fact that they exhibited humanlike practices. Thus, helping determine how similar they may have been to us. Archeologists have determined t ...
    Related: burial, human beings, human history, social status, ceremonial
  • Cause Of The Culture Wars - 1,103 words
    Cause of the Culture wars Even a casual observer of the American culture cannot help but be impressed by the increasing degree of polarization not only of American politics, but of cultural values and even lifestyles and attitudes. There seems to be an endless array of conflict - not just minor differences of opinion, but major conflict - even resulting in violence and murder. The results seem to be applauded or abhorred - depending on whose side you are on. The outcome of this conflict could not be more important - it is nothing less than the survival of Western civilization. This is because the roots of this conflict run far deeper than most people realize, and its consequences far more se ...
    Related: american culture, culture wars, human history, civil rights, couldn
  • Causes Of War And Threats To Peace - 1,034 words
    Causes Of War And Threats To Peace War or Peace Causes of War and Threats to Peace War is one of the responses by which one society tries to reduce the capacity of another society to obtain its objectives, when one or several of these are conflicting with those of the first society. By this response, society A tries to get the society B to do what is not convenient for B, but of convenience to A. In other words, A tries to get B to do something unnatural, namely NOT to try to reach its own objectives. This is in direct contradiction with the definition of an intelligent system of a human being, and resisted by B. Societies, since they are intelligent systems (IS), always act as best they see ...
    Related: social darwinism, human history, social development, propaganda, violation
  • Child Abuse Ii - 1,109 words
    Child Abuse II Imagine for one moment that you are not yourself any longer. Visualize instead that you are a young girl; old enough to know right from wrong yet still young enough to be terrified by the dark shadows in your room. It is a cool autumn night and your parents have opted to attend a party which you are not allowed at. It will be fine,? they say. Although you already know what is to come. Your uncle comes over to watch you for the evening, and your parents are so pleased by the fact that they do not have to find a sitter. As soon as he arrives, your mother kisses you on the cheek and scurries out the door to join your father already waiting in the car outside. The nightmare begins ...
    Related: abuse, child abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, young child
  • China Economic Growth - 2,074 words
    China Economic Growth Two years after the death of Mao Zedong in 1976, it became apparent to many of China's leaders that economic reform was necessary. During his tenure as China's premier, Mao had encouraged social movements such as the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution, which had as their bases ideologies such as serving the people and maintaining the class struggle. By 1978 "Chinese leaders were searching for a solution to serious economic problems produced by Hua Guofeng, the man who had succeeded Mao Zedong as CCP leader after Mao's death" (Shirk 35). Hua had demonstrated a desire to continue the ideologically based movements of Mao. Unfortunately, these movements had left ...
    Related: china, chinese economic, economic crisis, economic development, economic growth, economic performance, economic reform
  • Clash Of Civilizations - 2,243 words
    Clash Of Civilizations The Clash of Civilizations suggests that world politics is entering a new phase. It is his hypothesis that the fundamental source of conflict in the New World will not be primarily ideological or primarily economic. Huntington believes that the great divisions amongst humankind and the dominating source of conflict will be in the cultural form. Nation states will still remain the most powerful actors in world affairs, but the principal conflicts of global politics will occur between nations and groups of different civilizations. Huntington states: "The clash of civilizations will dominate global politics. The fault lines between civilizations will be the battle lines o ...
    Related: chinese civilization, clash, western civilization, economic systems, north america
  • Class Struggles - 2,621 words
    Class Struggles Having declared in the opening sentence of the Manifesto that all history is the history of class struggles, Marx adds immediately in a footnote "of written history". For prior to the invention of writing, societies were nomadic, organized in tribes, each tribe made of less than 100 individuals. There was hardly any division of labor, other than sexual. The tribe would designate a chief, and modern ethnology tells us the chief had very little power. His main function was to defuse any conflict among tribesmen, not as a judge, he had no power to judge, but more by using his charisma to talk people out of their quarrels. His authority would be limited to leading the hunt and, o ...
    Related: ruling class, state police, social conditions, divine right, chap
  • Cloning Humans - 1,364 words
    Cloning Humans "And the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrilsthe breath of life; and man became a livingsoul . . . and He took one of his ribs, and closed up the flesh instead thereof; and the rib, which the Lord God had taken from man, made He a woman and brought her unto man." -Genesis 2:7 21-22 Human cloning is becoming one of the most controversial topics of our time. With recent technological breakthroughs, whole new fields are opening with amazing possibilities. Despite the great advantages that cloning can offer humanity, there are just as many negative aspects of the technology, which have given way to large anti-cloning groups who are gaining ...
    Related: cloning, human beings, human cloning, human history, human race
  • Cocaine - 1,412 words
    Cocaine Cocaine is an alkaloid found in leaves of a South American shrub. It is a powerfully reinforcing stimulant. The drug induces a sense of exhilaration in the user primarily by blocking the dopamine from going into your brain. Life-long happiness will be genetically pre-programmed. "Peak experiences" will become a natural part of everyday mental health. Cocaine, alas, offers merely a tragically delusive short-cut. Before Columbian times, the coca leaf was reserved for Inca royalty. The natives subsequently used it for mystical, religious, social, nutritional and medicinal purposes. They exploited its stimulant properties to ward off fatigue and hunger, enhance endurance, and to promote ...
    Related: cocaine, human experience, sherlock holmes, drug testing, wonderful
  • Communism Is A Concept Or System Of Society In Which The Community Owns The Major Resources And Means Of Production Rather Th - 1,276 words
    Communism is a concept or system of society in which the community owns the major resources and means of production rather than by individuals. (Beers 670) Which means if that theory was true, everything should be shared between people. That also suggests that society wouldnt need a government because this society would be without rulers. However, communism also involves the abolition of private property by a revolutionary movement. In the early 19th century the idea of a communist society was a response of the poor and dislocated to the beginning of modern capitalism. (Carr 28) At that time communism was the basis for a number of Utopian settlements. Most Communistic experiments, however, f ...
    Related: capitalist system, communism, modern society, owns, central europe
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