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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: human genome

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  • Human Genome Project - 1,383 words
    Human Genome Project The Task at Hand Science is defined as knowledge based on observed facts and tested truths arranged in an orderly system. It has had an extreme effect on technology, which covers production, transportation, and even entertainment. In the past, though, science has always remained distant. However, with the birth of genetic engineering, science has become something that will deeply affect lives. Advancements are being made daily with genetic engineering: the Human Genome Project is nearly done, gene replacement therapy lies within reach, and cloning is on the horizon. Genetically altered foods have already become an important aspect of life with "new and better varieties" ...
    Related: genome, genome project, human genome, victor frankenstein, political issues
  • Human Genome Project - 1,376 words
    Human Genome Project HUMAN GENOME PROJECT Adam and Eve were doomed for trying to be like god, this is the same damnation mankind is headed to. Everyone's dream is to have absolute power and control of everything. The genome project and DNA engineering gives man the ability to create life and customize life to his specific needs of likes. So how good is too good? Man's ability to make life or create perfect human beings so they can be in a state of Utopia will disturb the balance of nature. Every individual, every child born on earth is unique i it's own way, not only by looks but also by their character, their DNA. Changing this by producing two of the same kind, of which one is produced in ...
    Related: genome, genome project, human beings, human error, human evolution, human genome
  • Human Genome Project - 970 words
    Human Genome Project Human Genome Project The Human Genome Project (HGP) is an international 13 year effort that began in October of 1990. The main objective of the project is to map the entire human DNA sequence. The project was planned to last 15 years, but rapid technological advances have moved the completion date to 2003. A rough draft of the human genome was completed in June 2000. Efforts are still underway to complete the finished high quality sequence. Many laboratories around the United States receive funding from either the Department of Energy (DOE) or the National Institutes of Health, or from both, for the HGP. Other researchers at colleges, universities, and laboratories throu ...
    Related: genome, genome project, human evolution, human genome, risk assessment
  • Morality And The Human Genome Project Mwf 11:00 Bibliography Congress Of The United States, Office Of Technology Assessment, - 1,353 words
    Morality and the Human Genome Project MWF 11:00 Bibliography Congress of the United States, Office of Technology Assessment, Mapping Our Genes: Genome Projects: How Big, How Fast?, Johns Hopkins University Press: Baltimore,1988. Gert, Bernard, Morality and the New Genetics: A Guide for Students and Health Care Providers, Jones and Bartlett: Sudbury, Massachusetts,1996. Lee, Thomas F., The Human Genome Project: Cracking the Genetic Code of Life, Plenum Press: New York, 1991. Murphy, Timothy F., and Lappe, Marc, ed., Justice and the Human Genome Project, University of California Press: Berkeley, 1994. Does the Human Genome Project affect the moral standards of society? Can the information prod ...
    Related: congress, genome, genome project, human body, human genome, morality, technology
  • The Human Genome Project - 943 words
    The Human Genome Project The Human Genome Project is a worldwide research effort with the goal of analyzing the structure of human DNA and determining the location of the estimated 100,000 human genes. The DNA of a set of model organisms will be studied to provide the information necessary for understanding the functioning of the human genome. The information gathered by the human genome project is expected to be the source book for biomedical science in the twenty-first century and will be of great value to the field of medicine. The project will help us to understand and eventually treat more than 4,000 genetic diseases that affect mankind. The scientific products of the human genome proje ...
    Related: genome, genome project, human condition, human disease, human genome
  • The Human Genome Project - 1,403 words
    The Human Genome Project title = The Human Genome Project The Human Genome Project, What Is It? What would you do if you were given the power to change your genetic code from brown hair to blond?. Man has had this ability through natural selection for some time without knowing it, but in the near future scientist will be able to speed the process of natural selection by changing a persons genes. Scientists have identified what constitutes human DNA located in the nucleus of a cell. The Human Genome Project was established to identify the genes that make us who we are and is now an international organization. The massive task of identifying the numerous gene combinations has created a problem ...
    Related: genome, genome project, human genome, project planning, jurassic park
  • What Is The Human Genome Project - 1,297 words
    What is the Human Genome Project? The Human Genome Project (HGP) is an international research program designed to construct detailed genetic and physical maps of the human genome, to determine the complete nucleotide sequence of human DNA, to localize the estimated 80,000 genes within the human genome, and to perform similar analyses on the genomes of several other organisms used extensively in research laboratories as model systems. This project is estimated to take 15 years to complete from October 1990 and has already cost the U.S. 2.5 billion dollars. The scientific products of the HGP will comprise a resource of detailed information about the structure, organization and function of huma ...
    Related: genome, genome project, human biology, human genetics, human genome, human nature
  • Albinism - 1,236 words
    Albinism INTRODUCTION For my research project I have chosen the genetic disease albinism. There are a few reasons why I chose albinism as my topic. First and foremost, in kindergarten I had a friend who was an albino, and although I have not seen him in over 10 years I am still curious as to what the causes of albinism are. Back then, my mother explained it to me by saying, thats just the way his skin is which is a fine way to explain it to a five year old, but now I find myself wanting to know more. Another reason I am curious about albinism actually extends from my first reason. I often wondered if there was any chance that my kids could possibly be born with it. I know now that it sounds ...
    Related: genetic disease, bibliography references, human genome, yellow, researching
  • Alcoholosm - 1,165 words
    ... ven a small head size. Furthermore, FAS children may develop hearing problems, heart defects and physical and behavioural problems. Researchers have also found that some children who were exposed to alcohol during fetal development show only some of the characteristics of FAS, these children are diagnosed as having fetal alcohol effects (FAE). However, both FAS and FAE individuals may have some degree of brain damage (Brent, 1991). Clearly, in addition to physiological, social, and psychological factors which all play a role in contributing to alcoholism, recent studies reveal that there may be a genetic predisposition to alcoholism. More specifically, medical research indicates that alc ...
    Related: natural history, university press, york oxford university press, science, abnormal
  • Antisense Theory - 586 words
    Antisense Theory It is estimated that cancer affects three out of four families in the United States alone the disease and its treatments cause substantial mortality and morbidity, prompting intense interest in cancer prevention. Most available treatments for cancers are non-specific; meaning that they target all rapidly growing cells, both normal and cancerous. Consequences of these treatments include side effects towards the normal cells. In addition, cancer is a genetically unstable disease. Cancer cells can develop drug resistance through repeated rounds of mutation and selection. This may render a particular non-specific chemotherapeutic treatment ineffective so that new drugs must be a ...
    Related: human genome, side effects, gene expression, render, bound
  • Apoptosis And Aging - 1,110 words
    Apoptosis And Aging When we gain control of the gene responsible for the phenomenon of apoptosis, we will be in control of aging. We are finding more evidence every day, indicating genetic links to all sorts of factors in the human being. We are just now beginning to scratch the surface of our own genetics. A landmark discover has just been unveiled: In February [2001], the two groups charting the human genome published their results - the entire 3 billion base pair sequence. The only definitive conclusion so far: Humans are far more complicated than we thought. ... Eric Lander, director of the Whitehead Center for Genome Research in Cambridge, Massachusetts ... adds: "within a decade, we wi ...
    Related: aging, apoptosis, personal interview, natural process, florida
  • Benifits Of Technology - 1,517 words
    Benifits Of Technology Man, powered by his imagination and inquisitive character, has wondered he mechanisms of Nature since time infinite. This quest for the truth, the ways in which his surrounding works, has led to many a scientific discoveries and innovations. Since the art of making fire and creating handcrafted tools, our civilization has come a long way. Science and Technology are making advances at an amazing rate. From telephones to the Internet, calculators to computers, cars to rockets and satellites, we are submerged in a sea of discoveries and inventions made possible by Science. Fields like Medicine and communications have made inroads into our cultures and thus our lifestyles. ...
    Related: medical technology, science and technology, technology, second chance, genome project
  • Bioethics - 2,327 words
    Bioethics As our technology continues to advance, new breakthroughs in medicine are discovered. With these new developments serious ethical and moral questions arise. Advancements in genetic engineering, reproductive technologies, cloning, organ transplanting, and human experimentation are all causes of concern. The Human Genome Project, an incredible scientific undertaking determined to produce a map of the human DNA code, will tell us how each gene or group of genes function (Lemonick and Thompson 44). With this map, scientists and doctors will be able to figure out how genes can malfunction and cause deadly diseases. Of course, they will also know what each gene controls, and how to manip ...
    Related: heart disease, cosmetic surgery, genetic engineering, genetically, engineer
  • Cancer Treatment - 1,837 words
    Cancer Treatment There are many ways to treat cancer. In fact, when you enter "cancer treatments" into any web browser you will find millions of web sites on how to treat cancer. Some examples of these treatments are chemotherapy, oxygen therapy, vitamin D therapy, food therapy, immunotherapy, and many others. Certain types of therapies go with certain types of cancers. For example, vitamin D therapy goes with breast cancer and immunotherapy goes with colon cancer. Cancer has taken the lives of millions of people and I believe it is important to inform people of what treatments are circulating in the medical profession. The human genome project's goal is to map and sequence the tens of thous ...
    Related: brain cancer, breast cancer, cancer, cancer prevention, cancer treatment, colon cancer, lung cancer
  • Dna Code - 1,076 words
    DNA Code Only a small fraction of our total DNA makes us different from gorillas, chimpanzees and other primates. An even smaller fraction makes one person different from the next. It's these differences that forensic DNA experts use to identify people and determine the source of biological evidence such as blood or semen found at a crime scene. DNA testing is powerful, sensitive and effective in pointing to the guilty and absolving the innocent. To date, 67 convicted felons have been exonerated nationwide based on DNA evidence. The vast majority of those have been rape cases. But DNA testing as it is now performed raises a question as to whether the public should fear that an innocent perso ...
    Related: civil liberties, human genome, personal information, procedure, scope
  • Dna Profiling - 1,264 words
    DNA Profiling Genetic engineering has developed and blossomed at a frightening rate in the last decade. Originating as merely an area of interest for scientists, genetic engineering has now become an area of which all people should be somewhat knowledgeable. DNA profiling has many uses, both positive and negative, in our society. Aside from its usefulness in many legal investigations, DNA profiling can be used in the workplace to discriminate against employees whose profiles could pose a financial risk. For example, genetic technology can and has been used to determine the capacity of a person to contract certain diseases, such as sickle-cell anemia, which could cause many employers to hesit ...
    Related: dna profiling, profiling, criminal investigations, federal government, jury
  • Eugenics - 1,452 words
    Eugenics President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, as the nation approached its third year of bloody civil war. The proclamation declared "that all persons held as slaves" within the rebellious states "are, and henceforward shall be free." The Civil War was fought to save the republic and free the enslaved. World War II was fought to save the world and stop a group which thought they were a superior race. What do these two wars have in common? They were fought, in part, for equality. The difference or believed difference between people causes tension and discrimination. Genetic engineering will cause a new form of differences between people and will c ...
    Related: eugenics, equal opportunity, abraham lincoln, genetically modified, tangible
  • Gene Therapy - 637 words
    Gene Therapy Many diseases seen today are the result of a defective gene in the DNA of the patient and can not be cured using the traditional methods such as antibiotics and antiviral medication. The victims are now looking to gene therapy as a potential cure for their problems. Bob Williamson introduces us the concept, procedures, and problems associated with gene therapy in his article, "Gene Therapy". Along with the appearance of the recombinant DNA technology, it becomes possible for human beings to isolate, study, and change gene in the laboratory. Gene Therapy is the process of replacing a defective gene inside a patients DNA with a working gene that will produce the correct gene produ ...
    Related: gene, gene therapy, therapy, sickle cell, immune system
  • Genes Study - 1,060 words
    Genes Study The study of all genus of various organisms will yield answers to some of the most intriguing questions about life: how organisms evolved, whether synthetic life will ever be possible and how to treat a wide range of medical disorders. Human genome contains all of the biochemical instructions in the form of the DNA bases A, T, C and G- for making and containing a human being. The payoff from the reference work will come from understanding the proteins encoded by the genes. Proteins not only make up the structural bulk of the human body but also include the enzymes that carry out the biochemical reactions of life. They are composed of unites called amino acids linked together in ...
    Related: genes, environmental influences, small group, daily lives, cellular
  • Genetic Engineering - 357 words
    Genetic Engineering *HTML**FONT SIZE=2 PTSIZE=8*However, if the problems of today and the need to remember historical atrocities in genetics are important, it is just as critical to plan ahead. The next 100 years will see changes more dramatic than the 20th century, which saw the creation of molecular genetics, the rise and fall of eugenics, and the creation of a U.S. and international human genome mapping effort. It is time, I believe, to use some imagination to think about what might come to be in the world of genetics in the next 100 years. Only by looking at the long-term outcomes of our current genetic research will we see the compelling need to confront the most basic questions posed b ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic engineering, genetic research, international human
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