Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: human activity

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  • Acid Rain - 1,289 words
    Acid Rain Pollution comes in various forms. Whether its toxic waste, CFCs, or sewage, they are all hazardous, to the earth. These can deplete the earth and its inhabitants of resources, causing a harmful change. A product of pollution is acid rain. We shall see that acidification is harmful to all forms of life. Acid rain is any form of precipitation that is polluted by sulphur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen oxides (NOX). This acid precipitation can be in the form of rain, snow, sleet, fog, or cloud vapors. The acidity of substances dissolved in water are measured by their pH levels. Normal precipitation pH levels fall between 5.0-5.6.2 When levels fall below these numbers, then the precipitati ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, human activity, food supply
  • Air Pollution - 1,546 words
    Air Pollution Air Pollution is addition of harmful substances to the atmosphere resulting in damage to the environment, human health, and quality of life. One of many forms of pollution, air pollution occurs inside homes, schools, and offices; in cities; across continents; and even globally. Air pollution makes people sick, it causes breathing problems and promotes cancer, and it harms plants, animals, and the ecosystems in which they live. Some air pollutants return to earth in the form of acid rain and snow, which corrode statues and buildings, damage crops and forests, and make lakes and streams unsuitable for fish and other plant and animal life. Pollution is changing the earth's atmosph ...
    Related: air pollution, pollution, greenhouse gases, global scale, burn
  • Anarchy - 1,764 words
    Anarchy Throughout the ages, man has toiled with various forms of government. From early day aristocracies to modern day democracies, man has developed theories of the ideal government. Of these governments, Anarchy has proven itself to be an unrealistic form of government. Anarchists pose different views of absolute liberty and the degree of government intervention as to the governmental figure of the times. Anarchy comes from the Greek word, anarchos, prefix an meaning 'not,' 'the want of,' 'the absence of,' or 'the lack of,' plus archos, meaning 'a ruler,' 'director,' 'chief,' 'person in charge,' or 'authority,' derived as 'having no government' or 'without rule' ( Justice define ...
    Related: anarchy, working class, ancient china, self reliance, nonviolent
  • Andre Malraux And Althussererian Internal Distance - 1,665 words
    Andre Malraux And Althussererian Internal Distance "Claude was growing aware of the essential oneness of the forest and had given up trying to distinguish living beings from their setting, life that moves from life that oozes; some unknown power assimilated the trees with the fungoid growths upon them, and quickened the restless movements of all the rudimentary creatures darting to and fro upon a soil like marsh-scum amid the steaming vegetation of a planet in the making. Here what act of man had any meaning, what human will but spent its staying power?" Above all else, Andre Maulraux's The Royal Way is a novel about the futility of the actions of man, but in man's brief existence in this wo ...
    Related: andre, human life, human activity, political issues, taste
  • Anthropolgy - 1,276 words
    Anthropolgy Anthropology- the study of humankind everywhere, through time, seeks to produce reliable knowledge about people and their behavior, both about what makes them different and what they have in common. What They Do- Physical anth- study humans as biological organisms, tracing there evolutionary development of the human animal and looking at biological variations within the species, past and present (human evol, Primates, Human diversity. Cultural Anth- is concerned with human cultures, or the ways of life in societies. Culture bound- Theories about the world and reality based on the assumptions and values of ones own culture. Within the field of cultural anth are Archaeologist- Is t ...
    Related: blue eyes, common culture, human diversity, assign, volcanic
  • Aristotle On Pleasure - 2,533 words
    ... e not as being of the essence of youth but as following from a favorable condition of the causes of youth. Likewise pleasure follows from a favorable condition of the causes of the activity. (Aquinas, p86-7) After making clear his earlier points, Aristotle then goes on to discuss the properties of pleasure. First he looks at the duration of pleasure and acknowledges that it can not go on continuously because "nothing human is capable of continuous activity, and hence, no continuous pleasure arises either, since pleasure is a consequence of activity"(1175a5). Because humans would grow tired of whatever activity was bringing them pleasure, eventually they would have to stop. Were someone t ...
    Related: aristotle, pleasure, best person, political ideas, fortunate
  • Big Oil And Bus Ethics - 1,640 words
    ... al erosion, and if they blame oil companies then they don't show it. Regardless of the Natives' opinions, their rights are still being violated. The workers at the Alang ship-wrecking yards were happy for the work they had and the meager wages they were being paid, but a slew of their rights were being violated. A group of people, such as the Arctic slope natives can be in favor of activities and still have their rights (unspoiled environment) violated. Wildlife The right of habitat for the wildlife in the Arctic has been infringed upon to a degree by the oil companies. The problem with this argument is that the oil companies can offer proof that the wildlife in the area hasn't really su ...
    Related: ethics, ethical business, california press, economic development, alaska
  • Causes Of Endangered Species - 1,209 words
    Causes Of Endangered Species CAUSES OF ENDANGERED SPECIES The term endangered is used by international and national organizations to define plants and animals currently in danger of becoming extinct. Although the term endangered is universally used, the definition of an endangered species is greatly varied. In most cases, the factors causing an organism to become endangered are human- related. When discussing the causes of endangered species, it is important to understand that individual species are not the only factors involved in this dilemma. Endangerment is a broad issue, one that involves the habitats and environments where species live and interact with one another. Although some measu ...
    Related: endangered species, foreign species, native species, species, human activity
  • Cyprus History Of Conflic - 1,822 words
    Cyprus History Of Conflic annon Cyprus, an island in the Eastern Mediterranean, at the cross-roads of three continents - Europe, Asia and Africa - has one of the oldest histories of the world, dating back 9000 years. Its strategic position, its wealth in forests and mineral deposits, as well as its skilled craftsmen, made it the prized possession of the powers of the day. Cultural influences came from all directions - all major regional civilisations left their mark on the island, contributing to the development of a very rich and diverse cultural heritage. ANCIENT TIMES The Stone Age The first signs of human life on the island date back to c. 8500 BC during the Palaeolithic period. Evidence ...
    Related: cyprus, history, ottoman empire, british rule, olympic
  • Dialectic And Spectacle In The Harrowing Of Hell - 2,225 words
    Dialectic and Spectacle in the Harrowing of Hell Medieval Literary Drama Dialectic and Spectacle in the Harrowing of Hell Roland Barthes's essay on "The World of Wrestling" draws analogically on the ancient theatre to contextualize wrestling as a cultural myth where the grandiloquence of the ancient is preserved and the spectacle of excess is displayed. Barthes's critique -- which is above all a rewriting of what was to understand what is -- is useful here insofar as it may be applied back to theatre as another open-air spectacle. But in this case, not the theatre of the ancients, but the Middle English pageant presents the locus for discussing the sport of presentation, or, if you prefer, t ...
    Related: dialectic, spectacle, social values, western culture, barthes
  • Evolution Of Humans - 1,518 words
    ... this time, East African mammals adapted to drier more open grassland conditions. It was about this time that the new form of human emerged in Africa, a hominid with a much larger brain, excellent vision, and limbs and hips fully adapted to an upright posture. Paleoanthropologists call this hominid Homo Erectus, a human much taller than its diminutive predecessors, standing on average five feet six inches tall, with hands capable of precision gripping and many kinds of tool-making. The skull is more rounded than those of earlier hominids, but still had a sloping forehead and retreating brow ridges. Homo Erectus was more numerous and more adaptable than Homo habilis, and, on present eviden ...
    Related: evolution, human activity, human development, human evolution, human history, human language, human race
  • Gulf Of Tonkin - 1,693 words
    Gulf Of Tonkin The Gulf of Tonkin During the Vietnam war everyone had a different idea of what was right and wrong. Some people wanted a war and others didnt.. One thing for sure whatever side people were on they were willing to fight for what they believed in. People would protest the war and others would lie to help us get into the war. When the Gulf of Tonkin incident happened it was one of the most controversial things that had ever happened. The President of the United States went in front of Congress and the American people and lied about what had actually happened in the Gulf of Tonkin. In July 1964 the U.S. was patrolling the Gulf of Tonkin in North Vietnam. The destroyer was patroll ...
    Related: gulf, public law, world peace, armed forces, imminent
  • Heideggers Conceptual Essences: Being And The Nothing, Humanism, And Technology - 1,952 words
    Heideggers Conceptual Essences: Being And The Nothing, Humanism, And Technology Heideggers Conceptual Essences: Being and the Nothing, Humanism, and Technology Being and the Nothing are the same. The ancient philosopher Lao-tzu believed that the world entertains no separations and that opposites do not actually exist. His grounding for this seemingly preposterous proposition lies in the fact that because alleged opposites depend on one another and their definitions rely on their differences, they cannot possibly exist without each other. Therefore, they are not actually opposites. The simple and uncomplex natured reasoning behind this outrageous statement is useful when trying to understand ...
    Related: conceptual, technology, point of view, true essence, faster
  • India Overview - 2,872 words
    India Overview A Brief History of India The roots of Indian civilization stretch back in time to pre-recorded history. The earliest human activity in the Indian sub-continent can be traced back to the Early, Middle and Late Stone Ages (400,000-200,000 BC). The first evidence of agricultural settlements on the western plains of the Indus is roughly contemporaneous with similar developments in Egypt, Mesopotamia and Persia. The Indus Valley Civilization This earliest known civilization in India, the starting point in its history, dates back to about 3000 BC. Discovered in the 1920s, it was thought to have been confined to the valley of the river Indus, hence the name given to it was Indus Vall ...
    Related: british india, east india, india, india company, india today, north india, overview
  • Introduction - 1,565 words
    Introduction The discipline of archaeology can open up the past to us in a way in which we can enter into a dialogue with our ancestors. There are many ways it can do this: stratigraphic excavation, pottery typology, socio-historic interpretation, etc. However, one thread running through this increasingly focused pursuit is that of dating the physical findings to a particular cultural timeline. This is crucial if we are to know, with as much certainty as is allowed, who we are speaking with. Indeed, dating may be the proverbial thread that holds entire pursuit together, without which the individual pieces of the puzzle might be compared to the children of Israel, who the author of Judges des ...
    Related: middle east, magnetic field, nobel prize, oldest, establishing
  • Labelling Theory - 1,643 words
    ... s created as a way of looking at a general area of human activity (1963). However, it is not a theory, with all the achievements and obligations that go with the title, nor is it focussed exclusively on the act of labelling as some have thought. Moreover, Becker does mention some of the criticisms given to labelling theory. For example, he states how interactionist theories have been accused of giving aid and comfort to the enemy, be the enemy those who would upset the stability of the existing order of the Establishment. In essence, we have already mentioned the suggestion of Erikson that deviance is a necessary part of society, showing the difference between right and wrong, and encour ...
    Related: labelling, sociological theory, criminal behaviour, social control, mead
  • Margaret Atwood - 1,198 words
    ... vement which rejects love and men and all things traditional. Atwood's first few lines reduce the word "love" to an object of convenience. Her words are highly discouraging, as "love" is merely something sold for commercial value ("add lace on it . . .") and cutesy magazine advertisements "There are whole/ magazines with not much in them/ but the word love, you can/ rub it all over your body and you/ can cook with it too"(802). Again, here we see a bit more of the feminist theme we've come to expect from Margaret Atwood. She expertly mocks the type of women's literature that provides its reader's with mushy romance, heavy perfumes, and cooking recipes. Yet, as before, it is important to ...
    Related: atwood, margaret, margaret atwood, human relationships, point of view
  • Medieval Literary Drama - 2,222 words
    Medieval Literary Drama Medieval Literary Drama Dialectic and Spectacle in the Harrowing of Hell Roland Barthes's essay on "The World of Wrestling" draws analogically on the ancient theatre to contextualize wrestling as a cultural myth where the grandiloquence of the ancient is preserved and the spectacle of excess is displayed. Barthes's critique -- which is above all a rewriting of what was to understand what is -- is useful here insofar as it may be applied back to theatre as another open-air spectacle. But in this case, not the theatre of the ancients, but the Middle English pageant presents the locus for discussing the sport of presentation, or, if you prefer, the performance of the spo ...
    Related: drama, medieval, social values, mary magdalene, relating
  • Mending Wall - 900 words
    Mending Wall Mending Wall By Robert Frost (1914) "Mending Wall" is vintage Robert Frost. Vintage to the degree that Frost has often referred to the work as his second favorite poem. Within its lines are the simplicity of language and subject, realism and imagery, humor and cynicism that combine to reveal the meditative insight that marks the poetry of Robert Frost. An annual ritual of mending a stone wall that divides the adjoining property of two New England neighbors is the setting for a sharp contrast in perceptions. As in most Frost poems, as the ordinariness of the activity is specifically described one quickly perceives that the undertaking has much larger implications. It becomes the ...
    Related: mending, mending wall, human activity, robert frost, poet
  • Morality And Ethics And Computers - 1,645 words
    Morality and Ethics and Computers There are many different sides to the discussion on moral and ethical uses of computers. In many situations, the morality of a particular use of a computer is up to the individual to decide. For this reason, absolute laws about ethical computer usage is almost, but not entirely, impossible to define. The introduction of computers into the workplace has introduced many questions as well: Should employers make sure the workplace is designed to minimize health risks such as back strain and carpal tunnel syndrome for people who work with computers? Can employers prohibit employees from sending personal memos by electronic mail to a friend at the other side of th ...
    Related: computer crime, computer ethics, computer program, computer security, computer viruses, computer world, computers
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