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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: household

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  • A Consumer Is Socially Defined As Someone Whom Is Pressured Into Buying Items - 368 words
    1) A consumer is socially defined as someone whom is pressured into buying items forced upon them my capitalist methods. They are also people who believe that if they buy a particular item it will make their lives better. Society has forced consumerism unto people and it has increased over the last century. A consumer was not constructed until the 19th century, when the times emphasized moderation and self-denial. At this time workers were to be frugal and save their money. Most of the time the typical family produced most of what they needed and had few household possessions. The families had little arousal of desire because there were no prepackaged items with brand names and most of the i ...
    Related: buying, consumer, consumer credit, socially, federal government
  • Knowledge, Ability, And Skill - 1,682 words
    1. Demonstrates the necessary knowledge, ability, and skill for assessing the physical, emotional, and mental capabilities of concerned persons to carry out an intervention. 2. Demonstrates commitment to ABCI principle that the primary goal of intervention is to secure immediate help for the chemically dependent person first and foremost. 3. Demonstrates commitment to ABCIs principle that pre-intervention counseling sessions for concerned persons are short term an time limited and should not be prolonged to the extent that immediate help for the chemically dependent person is postponed. 4. Ensures that during the intervention statements by concerned person to the chemically dependent person ...
    Related: skill, family member, drug dependence, criminal justice, spouse
  • 1984 Televisions Vs Telescreens - 1,437 words
    1984 Televisions Vs Telescreens 1984 Televisions Vs Telescreens TV rots the senses in the head! It kills the imagination dead! It clogs and clutters up the mind! It makes a child so dull and blind. He can no longer understand a fantasy, A fairyland! His brain becomes as soft as cheese! His powers of thinking rust and freeze! An excerpt from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, By Roald Dahl, 1964 When George Orwells epic novel 1984 was published in 1949 it opened the publics imagination to a future world where privacy and freedom had no meaning. The year 1984 has come and gone and we generally believe ourselves to still live in "The Land of the Free;" however, as we now move into the 21st Cent ...
    Related: 1984, american television, television programming, violence on television, negative consequences
  • The Godly Family Of Colonial Massachusetts - 305 words
    "The Godly Family Of Colonial Massachusetts" "The Godly Family of Colonial Massachusetts" Puritans didn't really think of their family as a private household, but as an essential part of society. Many communities tied families to each other by birth or marriage. The communities of the seventeenth-century, being small, had many marriages and remarriages that created a kinship, which was a difficult to understand. In-laws and distant cousins were known as brothers, sister, aunts, uncles, mothers, fathers, and cousins. This relationship was very important in the social, economic life of the community, because it helped to develop trading networks and investments. Partnerships within families we ...
    Related: colonial, godly, massachusetts, seventeenth century, seventeenth
  • A Bet Against Internet Gambling - 1,187 words
    A Bet Against Internet Gambling 07 February 2001 A Bet against Internet Gambling I love gambling. Who doesn't? The minute you walk into a casino you are overwhelmed by exciting noises, flashing lights and people having a good time. There is so much excitement it isn't hard to become addicted, especially after your first big win. The rush you get from winning is something that is hard to parallel. Trust me I know. I almost became addicted. I realized the trouble I was heading for before it was too late. I was a lucky one. Many people aren't as lucky. It is especially easy for people who live very close to a casino to get addicted because it is so easily accessible. Now imagine if everyone who ...
    Related: gambling, gambling impact study commission, internet gambling, internet sites, online gambling
  • A Bird In The House - 1,007 words
    A Bird In The House The Position of women in the 1930's and 1940's is an important part of understanding the story, A bird in the house. Women made great strides in the twenties, gaining the right to vote, Among other statutory rights. This seemed to be the beginning of the idea that women were indeed afforded the same rights and priveliges as men1. Perhaps planting the first seeds of a liberated consciousness. Amelia Earhart became the first woman to complete the atlantic crossing single-handed. Feats of this magnitude opened the door for many other women to follow their dreams. The women in this novel represent three generations of Canadian women, In the 1930's to 40's. Their views all dif ...
    Related: bird, different types, canadian women, amelia earhart, deceptive
  • A Booming End To The 19th Century - 1,105 words
    A Booming End To The 19Th Century More changes occurred in America in the late 19th century than any other time period. The country went through rapid expansion from residents of its land to cuisine to transportation of goods and people. While the last quarter of the 20th century brought many modern conveniences, the century before brought this country things that would be nearly impossible to live without. The development of railroads was the single greatest change in the 19th century. In only twenty-five years, almost 70,000 miles of tracks were laid. This in itself was a great feat, because of all the people and products used in the building of the railroads. In order to build railroads, ...
    Related: civil war, conspicuous consumption, raw materials, layout, telephone
  • A Day In The Life Of An Ancient Athenian - 1,174 words
    A Day in The Life of an Ancient Athenian jenn neff A day in the life of an ancient Athenian Welcome to Athens, the marvel of Greece! The city which is the fountainhead of beauty, wisdom and knowledge. Even as your ship approaches the Athenian harbor Piraeus, you can see the marble monuments of the Acropolis and the shining golden edge of the spear, which belongs to the gigantic statue of the goddess Pallas Athene. This is one of the greatest works of the sculptor Phidias, and symbolizes both the power and justice of the "violet city" as it was called by his contemporaries. Athenian women had virtually no political rights of any kind and were controlled by men at nearly every stage of their l ...
    Related: ancient athens, ancient greeks, athenian, athenian women, family life
  • A Day In The Life Of Catherine Bana - 538 words
    A Day In The Life Of Catherine Bana Paringauxs article A Day in the Life of Catherine Bana, is one that is both moving and informative. Its description of the daily routine of a wife and mother from Balkoui shocks most American readers with the graphic reality of life in the impoverished nation. The article provides a vivid description of the geography of Sahel, the roles of males and females in this society, and the impact of recent international development. The families of Burknina-Faso depend on agriculture as the main source of their meager incomes. The climate and other geographical factors virtually shape the life Catherine Bana. She spends her days tending to the livestock and crops. ...
    Related: catherine, life expectancy, infant mortality, african culture, discusses
  • A Dolls House - 855 words
    A Doll's House Becoming Independent Throughout A Dolls House, Henrik Ibsen illustrates through an intriguing story how a once infantile-like woman gains independence and a life of her own. Ibsen creates a naturalistic drama that demonstrates how on the outside Nora and Torvald seam to have it all, but in reality their life together is empty. Instead of meaningful discussions, Torvald uses degrading pet names and meaningless talk to relate to Nora. Continuing to treat Nora like a pampered yet unimportant pet, Torvald thoroughly demonstrates how men of his era treat women as insignificant items to be possessed and shown off. While the Helmer household may have the appearance of being sociably ...
    Related: a doll's house, dolls house, nora helmer, henrik ibsen, insignificant
  • A House For Mr Biswas - 536 words
    A House For Mr. Biswas Ever since his birth, Mr. Biswas - the main protagonist of V.S. Naipaul's A House for Mr. Biswas - never has an opportunity to develop a sense of self. He is always finding himself in situations that make him feel powerless. Due to this powerlessness he is always in situations where he is having people tell him what to do. He never has any personal power. Mr. Biswas realizes that with money and possessions a person tends to have more power in society. Indeed, for Mr. Biswas owning a house serves as a symbol which illustrates his ability to realize a self-identity and gain personal power to take control of his life. Mr. Biswas is caught in the grasp of feudalism. He is ...
    Related: biswas, dream house, social structure, self identity, listening
  • A House For Mr Biswas - 553 words
    A House For Mr. Biswas Ever since his birth, Mr. Biswas - the main protagonist of V.S. Naipaul's A House for Mr. Biswas - never has an opportunity to develop a sense of self. He is always finding himself in situations that make him feel powerless. Due to this powerlessness he is always in situations where he is having people tell him what to do. He never has any personal power. Mr. Biswas realizes that with money and possessions a person tends to have more power in society. Indeed, for Mr. Biswas owning a house serves as a symbol which illustrates his ability to realize a self-identity and gain personal power to take control of his life. Mr. Biswas is caught in the grasp of feudalism. He is ...
    Related: biswas, dream house, self identity, social structure, dollhouse
  • A House For Mr Biswas - 553 words
    A House For Mr. Biswas Ever since his birth, Mr. Biswas - the main protagonist of V.S. Naipaul's A House for Mr. Biswas - never has an opportunity to develop a sense of self. He is always finding himself in situations that make him feel powerless. Due to this powerlessness he is always in situations where he is having people tell him what to do. He never has any personal power. Mr. Biswas realizes that with money and possessions a person tends to have more power in society. Indeed, for Mr. Biswas owning a house serves as a symbol which illustrates his ability to realize a self-identity and gain personal power to take control of his life. Mr. Biswas is caught in the grasp of feudalism. He is ...
    Related: biswas, dream house, v. s. naipaul, self identity, symbolic
  • A Jury Of Her Peers: A Character Analysis - 1,562 words
    A Jury Of Her Peers: A Character Analysis James McMasters English 112 October 17, 2000 A JURY OF HER PEERS - A CHARACTER ANALYSIS BY SUSAN GLASPELL As in the case of most, if not all, good allegorical stories, the primary impact of the tale is strongly influenced by the authors detailed characterization of the setting, as well as the characters feelings and passions. Certainly such is the case in Susan Glaspells story A Jury of Her Peers. Here we see a richness of characterization and setting that is elusive at first reading, but becomes clearer as the story evolves. In the final analysis, it becomes clear just who the jury is and the outcome of their collective verdict. It is by the use of ...
    Related: character analysis, jury, jury of her peers, human condition, breaking point
  • A Letter From Saudi Arabia - 1,402 words
    ... and an Arabic Muslim. When I say diversity, I basically mean the traditions, the way of practicing religion. I have come to realize the fact that Islam is practiced differently in all the different parts of the world, and the way I practiced it when I was in the US, is certainly quite different from what I have seen and practiced here. Then there are so many customs which actually have their root in the beliefs of Islam, which I was totally unaware of. For example everybody removes their shoes at the doorstep before entering the house, even when you are invited to someones home. Umar told me that it is a tradition that has been carried out for centuries now10. Speaking of traditions, in ...
    Related: arabia, saudi, saudi arabia, labor force, american dollar
  • A Lot Of Great Canadian Authors Base Their Books On The Prairie Or Land And Its Inhabitants Wild Geese By Martha Ostenso Is A - 1,025 words
    A lot of great Canadian authors base their books on the prairie or land and its inhabitants. Wild Geese by Martha Ostenso is a wonderful example of this. Throughout the novel, many references are made to natural elements and also animals. Three very noticeable references could be picked out. These references were made to Judith, who is seen as a wild horse, to the wild geese that always move to new places, and also to the weather and how the family's attitudes and emotions, especially Caleb's, are changed by it. Wild Geese are talked about quite frequently throughout this novel. There are many references to people who are compared to the wild goose, along with what they symbolize. Lind Arche ...
    Related: authors, canadian, inhabitants, martha, prairie
  • A Patriarchal World Assimilation - 1,578 words
    A Patriarchal World --Assimilation A Patriarchal World John Bodnar says it well when he suggests that the center of everyday life was to be found in the family-household. It was here that past values and present realities were reconciled, examined on an intelligible scale, evaluated and mediated. This assertion implies that the immigrant family-household is the vehicle of assimilation. I will take this assertion a step further and examine more specifically the powerful role of the patriarchal father within Anzia Yezierska's book Bread Givers and Barry Levinson's film Avalon. Yezierska's theme vividly depicts the constraint of a patriarchal world, while Levinson illustrates the process of ass ...
    Related: assimilation, old world, patriarchal, jewish american, more important
  • A Picture Of Colonial Life - 556 words
    A picture of Colonial Life A picture of Colonial Life When the Puritans and Pilgrims were coming to America, they had expected many new opportunities and freedom. They got both--along with loneliness, vulnerability, and ignorance. Now in the new land, they knew very little, except that of their old lives. They had to learn to live new lives, to hunt new and strange game, and experience the feeling of no one being there to help during during difficult times. Sure, they had each other, but when they came up on the shores of this wonderfully new land there was no one there to welcome them with open arms, or nice warm shelter. They knew no one in this new place, and knew nothing of the land. The ...
    Related: colonial, colonial life, everyday life, salem witch trials, medical treatment
  • A Quantum Computer A Future Technology - 1,415 words
    A Quantum Computer... a future technology Mike Damewood By the strange laws of quantum mechanics, Folger, a senior editor at Discover, notes, an electron, proton, or other subatomic particle is "in more than one place at a time," because individual particles behave like waves, these different places are different states that an atom can exist in simultaneously. Ten years ago, Folger writes, David Deutsch, a physicist at Oxford University, argued that it may be possible to build an extremely powerful computer based on this peculiar reality. In 1994, Peter Shor, a mathematician at AT&T Bell Laboratories in New Jersey, proved that, in theory at least, a full-blown quantum computer could factor ...
    Related: quantum, quantum computer, quantum mechanics, technology, simple steps
  • A Rose For Emily - 383 words
    A Rose For Emily Reading To Kill A Mockingbird and A Rose For Emily I noticed several differences and likenesses. I would like to convey my thoughts to you. Females in "A Rose For Emily" are depicted as reclusive, crazy, and nosy. Females in "To Kill A Mockingbird" are depicted as smart, outgoing, and full of pride. For example, Emily and Aunt Alexandra are both full of pride. Emily is so full of pride that when she finds out that Homer Barron is not going to marry her and that he is gay that she kills him. She lets the town think that they are married. When in fact she kills him. Emily is afraid of what the town will say about her. Aunt Alexandra is full of a different kind of pride. She is ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, rose for emily, to kill a mockingbird, homer barron
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