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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: homosexual

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  • Acceptance Of Homosexual Marriage - 1,033 words
    ... es. If gay couples were allowed to marry, it would set a bad example for children, and could spell the downfall of one of the cornerstones of our society. After all, whats next? Legalizing polygamy? Marriage between brothers? (Hetter 28-31) Hetter displays one belief of a large group of individuals who confuse what is right, and fair for society as a whole, with what is based on her one-sided religious beliefs. It is very difficult for some people to accept a change in things that differ from their everyday life and the way they were brought up. If those individuals could look at same-sex marriage open-mindedly they could see that they have been withholding, a precious right that could s ...
    Related: acceptance, gay marriage, homosexual, homosexual marriage, same-sex marriage
  • Homogenizing The Homosexual - 1,246 words
    Homogenizing The Homosexual On a hot June night in 1969 the sexual discourses of theology, law and psychology encountered resistance so strong that millions of lives were changed. In a small gay bar in New York, the regulars, an eclectic mix of drag queens, transexuals, effeminate men and butch women, offered up the most visible resistance ever witnessed to the relentless exercising of public power on their private lives. The three-day street riot, began by Stonewall patrons, spilled onto the front pages and television screens of a nation. The exposure placed the queen, queer and dyke in the living rooms, kitchens and supermarkets of straight America. The resistance of gays to the external a ...
    Related: homosexual, verbal abuse, social opportunity, north america, variation
  • Homosexual Behaviors - 1,489 words
    Homosexual Behaviors The cause of homosexual behaviors has long been a controversial topic debated by scientists, psychologists, and many others among the general population. The Newsweek article Born or Bred discusses many possible causes of homosexuality. According to the research done in 1991 by neuroscientist Simon LeVay, the area of the brain that controls sexual activity called the hypothalamus, was less than half the size in homosexual males compared to heterosexual males. This result tells us that homosexuals might not have gotten a chance to choose their sexuality because they were simply born into it. But there are loopholes in this research because Levay's subjects were all cadave ...
    Related: homosexual, sexual behavior, human sexuality, psychoanalytic theory, conforming
  • Homosexual Education - 1,331 words
    Homosexual Education Teaching sex education in public schools alone has become a very controversial subject with some parents and other community members. So one can only imagine the reaction to teaching about homosexual lifestyles as part of the sex education program. There are basically two different views on the subject of homosexuality. Some people are perfectly okay with it, while others cringe at the thought. Many parents would be highly upset if their child came home from school one day and said, Mommy, guess what? We got to learn about homosexuals today. Ms. Conner said we are supposed to accept them no matter what their sexual behavior. Why did you and daddy tell me it was bad? Ms. ...
    Related: education program, education teachers, education teaching, homosexual, sex education
  • Homosexual Marriage And The Catholic Church - 1,286 words
    Homosexual Marriage And The Catholic Church Imagine you were born into a world where being straight was taboo. You were raised by same sex parents, as all of your friends. Fornication of the opposite sex was merely to have children, but a relationship between the two was virtually unheard of. It was believed that same sex parents provided a better home for children. Love between a man and a man (or a woman and a woman) was believed to be the perfect love because it was loving an equal. If one should love the opposite sex it was believed that they secretly wanted to be that sex. Everything you have ever known and been taught was based around same sex relationships. When you watch television e ...
    Related: catechism of the catholic church, catholic, catholic church, homosexual, homosexual marriage
  • Homosexual Marriage And The Catholic Church - 1,348 words
    ... n, intolerant of ambiguity, status conscious, and cognitively rigid; more dogmatic; more sexually rigid and more guilty about their own sexual impulses" (Kirk 120-129). It seems that individuals who are afraid or intolerant of homosexuals seem to react the same way to other social situations as well. The personality characteristics of homophobic people can easily be identified in others that belong to another group of prejudiced people. From the personal perspective, homosexual prejudice can be a form of anxiety regarding one's own sexual feelings. Ignorance often spurs such feelings as fear and anxiety, and this also can be attributed to these prejudices. There seem to be points in hist ...
    Related: catholic, catholic church, homosexual, homosexual marriage, district of columbia
  • Why Homosexual Mariages Should Be Banned - 972 words
    Why Homosexual Mariages Should Be Banned A battle has been in progress for years over whether equal rights and equal protection against discrimination should be extended to homosexuals. Recently this has expanded into the area of marriage. The topic of homosexual marriages is a prevalent issue today. Even in the nation's capital, representatives are finding ways to make this alliance unlawful. This topic has been debated bringing up many valid points, but the fact of the matter is that homosexual marriages are wrong and we, as a country, should not condone such acts. Marriage is the institution whereby men and women are joined in a special kind of social and legal dependence for the purpose ...
    Related: banned, homosexual, homosexual marriage, sexual orientation, negative influence
  • A Steercar Named Desire Blanches Psychological Breakdown - 1,469 words
    A Steercar Named Desire - Blanche's Psychological Breakdown In Tennesse Williams' play, "A Streetcar Named Desire" the readers are introduced to a character named Blanche DuBois. In the plot, Blanche is Stella's younger sister who has come to visit Stella and her husband Stanley in New Orleans. After their first meeting Stanley develops a strong dislike for Blanche and everything associated with her. Among the things Stanley dislikes about Blanche are her "spoiled-girl" manners and her indirect and quizzical way of conversing. Stanley also believes that Blanche has conned him and his wife out of the family mansion. In his opinion, she is a good-for-nothing "leech" that has attached itself to ...
    Related: blanche dubois, breakdown, named desire, psychological, streetcar named, streetcar named desire
  • A Streetcar Named Desire - 1,095 words
    A Streetcar Named Desire While it can be argued that all of the characters in Tennese Williams' play, A Streetcar Named Desire are living in an illusion, I do not think that all the characters are living an unreal existence, however some are, in particular Blanche, Stella and Stanley. Blanch, to some extent, is living in her own fantasy world plagued with delusions and outbursts. It is quite obvious that she is living an illusion. Stella is living an unreal existence in regards to the way in which she likes to pretend she is living in a happy home. Stanley is also, however to a much lesser extent, living an unreal existence. He is very self-centered and towards the end he seems to be living ...
    Related: named desire, streetcar, streetcar named, streetcar named desire, upper class
  • A Study Of Catholicism - 592 words
    A Study of Catholicism A Study of Catholicism When "catholic" is used as an adjective, it means universal, open or general. I have read art magazines and reviews that have described certain art collections as "catholic in its uniqueness." The fact that Catholicism has its root in the word "catholic" is not a coincidence. In his essay "Catholicism: A Synthesis," Richard McBrien says that it is this notion that distinguishes Catholicism from other religions, Christian and non. The notion is that Catholicism is a religion that is based on open-mindedness. McBrien alludes to flags to clearly define his thesis. Many flags of the world share the same three colors. He uses the colors red, white, an ...
    Related: catholicism, human beings, catholic church, young girl, awareness
  • A View Of Modern Societ - 763 words
    A View Of Modern Societ I wrote this to try and take the reader on a journey. What you read here is a direct reflection of the current state of our society. I want to point out to you, the reader, exactly what is happening in the undercurrents of the digital frontier. Each image and video clip that you witness is part of the greater whole of the new Internet society that we all live in. It is your voice that has made this view popular. We are all fed up with the bland and tasteless media that is shoved down our collective throats day after day. When you go outside and see a billboard for GAP clothing or SONY consumer devices you may not realize that you are being programmed with each glance. ...
    Related: university school, mass communication, current state, sony, frontier
  • Absurd - 1,338 words
    ... hinoceros, as being the Nazi influence, and Berenger, the main character, as an ordinary man in an extraordinary situation. The chaos of the early to mid-twentieth century influenced Ionesco's life and work's greatly. He struggled with the concept of the absurd and soon became the father of the theatre of the absurd. He led men such as Samuel Beckett and Jean Genet to a greater understanding of the absurd. Samuel Beckett was one of the greatest names of the theater of the absurd. He spent a lifetime of hardship and work to overcome the challenges of his low self-esteem and confidence. He grew up in Dublin, Ireland, in a prominent family. After college, he was employed as James Joyce's se ...
    Related: absurd, modern world, liberation organization, middle class, autobiographical
  • Adolescent Sexuality - 1,525 words
    Adolescent Sexuality Adolescent Sexuality Sexuality is an important aspect of development during adolescence. The ability to identify and communicate with adolescent who may be at high risk of premature activity is important since sexual intercourse at an early age can have serious short and long-term consequences. An emphasis of confidentiality and an honest appraisal of implications of early sexual activity will enhance discussions about sexual issues with adolescents. Some parents are ill prepared for discussions about sexuality. Having conversations with their adolescent on sexuality may be difficult for them. Many adolescents claim both experience and confidence about sexual issues, the ...
    Related: adolescent, adolescent boys, adolescent girls, human sexuality, sexuality
  • Aggression And Its Intricacies - 2,232 words
    ... 19;s quota of aggression will not cause him to kill acquaintances, let alone wage war against strangers from a different country┘.The overwhelming majority of those who have killed┘have done so as soldiers in war, and we recognize that that has practically nothing to do with the kind of personal aggression that would endanger us as their fellow citizens. (8) Here a regular serving soldier spoke with experience of seeing the numerous soldiers that "[derived] their greatest satisfaction from male companionship, from excitement, and from the conquering of physical obstacles." Those men were most likely part of the 2 percent of combat soldiers (as noted by Swank and Marchandρ ...
    Related: aggression, world war ii, francis galton, human existence, cruel
  • Agression - 2,162 words
    ... in numerous altercations as children. Not as bullies but rather as fighters, the type of person who would not back down once attacked or hurt. This seemed like a strange connection between the type of job and a similarity in childhood activities, because significantly less than a third of school populations engage in fights on a regular basis. This seems to point at a genetic capacity for violence and aggression. More informally, Gwynne Dyer has felt, through his experiences as a soldier, his genes at work as he says; Aggression is certainly part of our genetic makeup, and necessarily so, but the normal human beings quota of aggression will not cause him to kill acquaintances, let alone ...
    Related: agression, sexual offenders, classical conditioning, aggressive behavior, weapons
  • Aids - 1,103 words
    Aids Aids Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), suppresses the immune system related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A person infected with HIV gradually loses immune function along with certain immune cells called CD4 T-lymphocytes or CD4 T-cells, causing the infected person to become vulnerable to pneumonia, fungus infections, and other common ailments. With the loss of immune function, a clinical syndrome (a group of various illnesses that together characterize a disease) develops over time and eventually results in death due to opportunistic infections (infections by organisms that do not normally cause disease except in people whose immune systems have be ...
    Related: aids, deficiency syndrome, human immunodeficiency, acquired immune, bacterial
  • Aids - 1,140 words
    ... f the mouth by the fungus Candida Albicans, is common in the early symptomatic phase of AIDS. Other infectious fungi include species of the genus Cryptococcus, a major cause of Meningitis in up to 13 percent of people with AIDS. Also, infection by the fungus Histoplasma Capsulatum affects up to 10 percent of people with AIDS, causing general weight loss, fever, and respiratory complications or severe central nervous system complications if the infection reaches the brain. Viral opportunistic infections, especially with members of the Herpes virus family, are common in people with AIDS. One Herpes family member, Cytomegalovirus (CMV), infects the retina of the eye and can result in blindn ...
    Related: aids, blood cells, nervous system, human cells, nose
  • Aids - 1,178 words
    Aids For an epidemic that would explode to claim hundreds of thousands of lives, AIDS surfaced very quietly in the United States, with a small notice on June 4, 1981 in a weekly newsletter published by the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, alerting doctors to five unusual cases of pneumonia that had been diagnosed in Los Angeles residents over the previous few months. All the patients were homosexual men who had come down with PCP (Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia), a lung infection usually seen only severely malnourished children or adults undergoing intensive chemotherapy. But until they got sick the California men were well nourished, vigorous adults, whose immune systems should have ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, aids research, high blood pressure, blood cells
  • Aids - 1,146 words
    AIDS Being one of the most fatal viruses in the nation, AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome) is now a serious public health concern in most major U.S. cities and in countries worldwide. Since 1986 there have been impressive advances in understanding of the AIDS virus, its mechanisms, and its routes of transmission. Even though researchers have put in countless hours, and millions of dollars it has not led to a drug that can cure infection with the virus or to a vaccine that can prevent it. With AIDS being the leading cause of death among adults, individuals are now taking more precautions with sexual intercourse, and medical facilities are screening blood more thoroughly. Even though HI ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, latin america, hepatitis b, pneumonia
  • Aids - 1,140 words
    ... rom a few days to several weeks and is associated with fever, sweats, exhaustion, loss of appetite, nausea, headaches, soar throat, diarrhea, swollen glands, and a rash on the torso. Some of the symptoms of the acute illness may result from HIV-1 invasion of the central nervous system. In some cases the clinical findings have correlated with the presence of HIV-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid. Symptoms disappear along with the rash and other sings of acute viral disease. When the blood test for HIV-1 antibodies become available, researchers demonstrated the lymphadenopathy was a frequent consequence of infection with the virus. Scientist do not know what causes the wasting syndrome, but som ...
    Related: aids, immune system, human immunodeficiency, recent studies, regulation
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