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  • Alfred Hitchcock - 1,409 words
    ALFRED HITCHCOCK He was known to his audiences as the 'Master of Suspense' and what Hitchcock mastered was not only the art of making films but also the task of taming his own imagination. Director of many works such as Vertigo, Psycho, The Birds and The 39 steps, Hitchcock told his stories through intelligent plots, witty dialogue and tales of mystery and murder. In doing so, he inspired a new generation of film makers and revolutionized the thriller film, making him a legend around the world. His brilliance was sometimes too bright: He was hated as well as loved. Hitchcock was unusual, inventive, impassioned, yet demanding. Alfred Joseph Hitchcock was born on August 13, 1899(Sennet 108). H ...
    Related: alfred, alfred hitchcock, hitchcock, american justice, horror film
  • Alfred Hitchcock - 1,554 words
    ... pathy for a peeping Tom killer in his forties (the age of the murderer in Bloch's novel), the director proposed using a much younger character and even suggested to the writer that Perkins get the lead role(Rebello 111). When Hitchcock began production on PSYCHO, he was told that he would have to use the facilities at Revue Studios, the television division of Universal Studios, which Paramount had rented for the making of the film(Rebello 112). Although he was unable to use his regular cinematographer, Robert Burks, Hitchcock managed to convince Paramount that his special editor, George Tomasini, should be included in the production(Rebello 110). The director's desire for detail was in f ...
    Related: alfred, alfred hitchcock, hitchcock, dressing room, high school
  • Birds By Hitchcock - 1,053 words
    Birds By Hitchcock The plot of Alfred Hitchcock's 1963 "The Birds," taken from a Daphne Du Maurier (who wrote the novel "Rebecca") short story, seems ludicrous. Birds attacking a small town, actually killing people. But in the competent hands of the master of suspense, the movie is frighteningly, well, suspenseful. Evan Hunter (who also writes under the name Ed McBain) wrote the screenplay, and while not all of the characters are well enough developed for the viewer to understand their occasionally awkward behavior, has nonetheless crafted an interesting story that captures and maintains interest. Birds are flapping about in the opening shots, a forewarning of their sinister activities to co ...
    Related: alfred hitchcock, hitchcock, birthday party, school children, viewer
  • Indigo By Hitchcock - 1,400 words
    Indigo By Hitchcock People are born with passion. The irony is that most people spend all their lives searching for that passion without looking inside that soul to the heart of the passion. The trick to discovering that passion is to find what makes us happy. For Indigo the main character of Sassafras, Cypress and Indigo by her passion lies in the music she creates from her soul while using her violin as her tool. From a modern literary criticism standpoint this passion is seen through her characterization and the symbolic use of the violin. However in peeling back the layers and focusing on this story from a Post Modern standpoint the reader uncovers deeper issues. There is a sense of dis ...
    Related: hitchcock, fall apart, post modern, literary criticism, explore
  • A Critique Of Two Concerts - 1,695 words
    A Critique Of Two Concerts Music is one of the most unique performing arts due to the way it has evolved. Styles and melodies considered unfit in one era are displayed prominently in another. The two concerts previewed in this report have two different and distinct techniques. The first performance that I attended was a symphonic concert playing a mix of contemporary and early 20th century works at Carnegie Hall. The second performance was an organ recital highlighted by the by the live performance of Bach's most well known pieces. Hopefully this term paper will objectively and subjectively critique and compare the two performances. An orchestra is a collection of a variety of instruments us ...
    Related: critique, baroque music, small group, renaissance music, horrific
  • A Thematic Analysis Of Alfred Hitchcocks Psycho - 1,465 words
    A Thematic Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho Arts- Movies A Thematic Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho has been commended for forming the archetypical basis of all horror films that followed its 1960 release. The mass appeal that Psycho has maintained for over three decades can undoubtedly be attributed to its universality. In Psycho, Hitchcock allows the audience to become a subjective character within the plot to enhance the film's psychological effects for an audience that is forced to recognise its own neurosis and psychological inadequacies as it is comp  elled to identify, for varying lengths of time, with the contrasting personalities of the film's m ...
    Related: alfred, alfred hitchcock, psycho, thematic, thematic analysis
  • Alchemy - 1,900 words
    Alchemy ALCHEMY: The science by aid of which the chemical philosophers of medieval times attempted to transmute the baser metals into gold or silver. There is considerable divergence of opinion as to the etymology of the word, but it would seem to be derived from the Arabic al=the, and kimya=chemistry, which in turn derives from the late Greek chemica=chemistry, from chumeia=a mingling, or cheein, `to pour out` or `mix', Aryan root ghu, to pour, whence the word `gush'. Mr. A. Wallis Budge in his "Egyptian Magic", however, states that it is possible that it may be derived from the Egyptian word khemeia, that is to say 'the preparation of the black ore', or `powder', which was regarded as the ...
    Related: alchemy, black white, modern times, roger bacon, france
  • Alchemy - 1,850 words
    ... e of Hermetic theory and the consciousness in the alchemical mind that what might with success be applied to nature could also be applied to man with similar results. Says Mr. Waite, "The gold of the philosopher is not a metal, on the other hand, man is a being who possesses within himself the seeds of a perfection which he has never realized, and that he therefore corresponds to those metals which the Hermetic theory supposes to be capable of developing the latent possibilities in the subject man." At the same time, it must be admitted that the cryptic character of alchemical language was probably occasioned by a fear on the part of the alchemical mystic that he might lay himself open t ...
    Related: alchemy, first half, chemical analysis, modern science, appeal
  • Alfred Hitchcocks Film Psycho - 209 words
    Alfred Hitchcock's Film Psycho In the opening situation of Alfred Hitchcock's film Psycho, we're at a hotel room where a man named Sam and a woman named Marian are seeing themselves privately. Marian seems like a very respectful woman, however, early in the film we see her steal $40,000 from her boss in the first opportunity she has. She takes the money and goes to California, to her boyfriend. On her way she stays at a motel where she meets Norman Bates who is a psycho killer, though we don't know this until the end of the film. Norman has a mental problem where he tries to keep his mother alive by becoming his mother. At the end of the film we learn that in reality Norman killed his mother ...
    Related: alfred, alfred hitchcock, film, psycho, norman bates
  • Arthur Miller And Tennessee Williams, Including A Streetcar Named Desire - 4,340 words
    Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams, including A Streetcar Named Desire (1947, film, 1951) and Death of a Salesman (1949). He directed the Academy Award-winning films Gentleman's Agreement (1947) and On The Waterfront (1954), as well as East of Eden (1955), A Face in the Crowd (1957), Splendor in the Grass (1961), and The Last Tycoon (1976). His two autobiographical novels, America, America (1962) and The Arrangement (1967), were turned into films in 1963 and 1968. Bibliography: Koszarski, Richard, Hollywood Directors, 1941-1976 (1977). Jolson, Al -------------------------------- (johl'-suhn) The singer Al Jolson, b. Asa Yoelson in Lithuania, c.1886, d. Oct. 23, 1950, immigrated with his fa ...
    Related: arthur, arthur miller, miller, named desire, streetcar, streetcar named, streetcar named desire
  • Arthur Miller And Tennessee Williams, Including A Streetcar Named Desire - 4,269 words
    ... g the subject matter of Face to Face (1975) overly familiar and rating his English-language The Serpent's Egg (1977) an overall failure. Autumn Sonata (1978) and From the Life of the Marionettes (1980) were critical successes, however, although the latter failed at the box office. Fanny and Alexander (1983), a rich and fantastic portrait of childhood in a theatrical family, was regarded as one of his finest films and won an Academy Award for best foreign language film of 1983. Subsequently, Bergman directed After the Rehearsal (1984), his meditation on a life in the theater. WILLIAM S. PECHTER Bibliography: Bergman, Ingmar, Bergman on Bergman (1973); Cowie, Peter, Ingmar Bergman: A Criti ...
    Related: arthur, arthur miller, miller, named desire, streetcar, streetcar named, streetcar named desire
  • Call - 953 words
    call joe bon bon Alfred Hitchcock Alfred Hitchcock As a cinematographer, I see Alfred Hitchcock as one of the most influential people in the history of the silver screen. My synopsis of his films, however, will be through the eyes of a young man that has witnessed tragedy. I could sit and rant and rave about how Hitchcock was a great director, his films were awesome, etc., but I'll spare you of that. I would much rather discuss the attack, but since I must write this paper about his cinema work, I'll try and compare the two movies we watched to the situation. I'll start first with Rear Window. Rear Window is a film that deals not only with the human instinct of voyeurism, but also with the s ...
    Related: trade center, world trade center, human nature, cinema, tragedy
  • Cinematography Of Hitchcocks Psycho - 564 words
    Cinematography Of Hitchcock's Psycho Alfred Hitchcock is renown as a master cinematographer (and editor), notwithstanding his overall brilliance in the craft of film. His choice of black and white film for 1960 was regarded within the film industry as unconventional since color was perhaps at least five years the new standard. But this worked tremendously well. After all, despite the typical filmgoers dislike for black and white film, Psycho is popularly heralded among film buffs as his finest cinematic achievement; so much so, that the man, a big name in himself, is associated with the film, almost abovehis formidable stature. Imagining it in color, Psycho would not appear as horrific, and ...
    Related: alfred hitchcock, cinematography, psycho, film industry, norman bates
  • Effects Of Popaganda Films On Wwii - 1,258 words
    ... ore each new aggressive move by Germany, as for example, against Czechoslovakia in 1938, the German press, radio and newsreels publicized alleged evidence of persecution of German minorities in the victim country. Incidents were manufactured and exploited to justify German intervention. The German war machine was depicted as invincible. The technique proved effective in dividing populations, weakening the power of the victim to resist, and causing its allies to hesitate. Plus bring back films from the fronts lines of various German victories help win more and more support back home, along with helping to recruit young men who too wanted to be like the heroes portrayed by these films. By ...
    Related: film noir, films, wwii, american people, nazi propaganda
  • Excellence, Popularity, Typicality Discuss The Relative Merits Of Each Of These As A Basis For The Inclusion Of Films In A Fi - 1,414 words
    'Excellence', 'Popularity', 'Typicality' - Discuss The Relative Merits Of Each Of These As A Basis For The Inclusion Of Films In A Film History 'Excellence', 'popularity', 'typicality' - discuss the relative merits of each of these as a basis for the inclusion of films in a film history Any attempt to study film history requires the consideration of films, which occur within the categories of excellence, popularity and typicality. They are three very different approaches to film history; 'excellence' covering films recognised as having artistic merit, 'popularity' covering films which have been financially or sociologically successful and 'typicality', films which are classed as mainstream d ...
    Related: cannes film festival, film history, films, horror films, inclusion, relative
  • Film Auterism - 1,301 words
    Film Auterism Auteurism is a term first coined by Francois Truffaut to describe the mark of a film director on his films. A director can be considered an auteur if about five of his film depict a certain style that is definitely his own. In other words, much like one can look at a painting and tell if it is a Monet, a Renoir, or a Degas, if a film director is an auteur, one can look at his film and tell by style and recurring themes that it was made by a certain director. In auteur films, the director is many times what brings an audience to the theater, instead of the actors or storyline. I am going to take a look at three of the most noted auteurs: Frederico Fellini, Satyajit Ray, and Alfr ...
    Related: film, film history, main character, love story, literally
  • Hitlers Weltanschauung World View - 1,686 words
    Hitlers Weltanschauung (World View) name = Glen R. Hees email = SigmaChi25 publish = yes subject = World Civ II title = Hitler's Weltanschauung (World View) In the early quarter of the twentieth century, a young man was beginning to fill his mind with ideas of a unification of all Germanic countries. That young man was Adolf Hitler, and what he learned in his youth would surface again as he struggled to become the leader of this movement. Hitler formed views of countries and even certain cities early in his life, those views often affecting his dictation of foreign policy as he grew older. What was Hitlers view of the world before the Nazi Party came to power? Based in large part on incident ...
    Related: adolf hitler, world power, world view, great britain, nazi party
  • Jazzzzz - 1,115 words
    Jazzzzz Jazz Jazz has been an influence in many artist's work, from painting to other forms of music. Jazz is an American music form that was developed from African-American work songs. The white man began to imitate them in the 1920's and the music form caught on and became very popular. Two artists that were influenced by jazz were Jean-Michel Basquiat and Stuart Davis. The influence is quite evident in many of their works, such as Horn Players, by Basquiat, and Swing Landscape, by Davis. Stuart Davis was born in Philadelphia in 1894. He grew up in an artistic environment, his father was art director of a Philadelphia newspaper, who had employed Luks, Glackens, and other members of the Eig ...
    Related: charlie parker, modern art, dizzy gillespie, celebration, aural
  • Jungle By Upton Sinclair - 1,475 words
    Jungle By Upton Sinclair A French philosopher once said that the greatest tyranny of democracy was when the minority ruled the majority. Upton Sinclairs The Jungle gives the reader a great example of exactly this. A man who earns his living honestly and through hard work will always be trapped in poverty, but a man who earns his living through lies and cheating will be wealthy. The Jungle portrays a Lithuanian family stuck in a Capitalistic country. It shows the ongoing struggle of a lower class that will never get farther in life as long as the minority of rich people rule over them. The Jungle conveys a struggle between Capitalism and Socialism. Socialism is the best way out for the peasan ...
    Related: jungle, sinclair, the jungle, upton, upton sinclair
  • Media Studies Psycho Essay Charlie Anderson - 1,241 words
    Media Studies Psycho Essay Charlie Anderson In his masterpiece "Psycho", director Alfred Hitchcock propels his narrative through closely following and manipulating the different aspects of the film matrix. These include the basic uses of conflict resolution, the manoeuvring of time and space and the utilisation of the narratives codes and conventions. Hitchcock uses a succession of non-autonomous scenes to describe how the apparent protagonist, Marian Crane (played by Janet Leigh), decides to steal $40,000, flee her home in Phoenix and undertake a long automobile trip to California. To the audience, it appears as though Marian Crane's theft and flight are the principal elements of the film's ...
    Related: anderson, charlie, media, media studies, psycho
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