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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: historical context

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  • 272: Number Of Words That Redefined America - 1,107 words
    272: Number Of Words That Redefined America The two hundred seventy-two words of President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address are as significant today as they were six score and seventeen years ago. Garry Wills' Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words That Remade America, explicates these two hundred seventy-two words and paints a new picture that gives us the historical context of the President's speech. It was short enough for generations of people to remember, yet at the same time, long enough to have a great impact on the ways we think of this great republic. Wills argues that through his speech Lincoln remade the American history in that Americans would interpret the Civil War, and the Constitution, ...
    Related: america, america history, united states of america, american history, president lincoln
  • A Mid Summer Nights Dream Film Analysis - 1,207 words
    A Mid Summer Night's Dream Film Analysis A Mid Summer Night's Dream Film Analysis A Mid summer Night's Dream is another entry into Shakespeare's recent rebirth on film. Michael Hoffman's film dose not stay true to the text, but he must take liberties to allow for this classic story to be entertaining to today's audience. In this essay I will discuss the differences between the text vision and the film vision of this story from the historical setting, the time placement, Hoffman's personal adaptations, and finally Hoffman's character adaptations. In Michael Hoffman's film of William Shakespeare's a Midsummer Night's Dream, Hoffman has made some changes to the location and historical aspects o ...
    Related: a midsummer night's dream, dream, film, film analysis, film version, midsummer night, night dream
  • Affirmative Action - 483 words
    Affirmative Action Affirmative Action President John F. Kennedy used the phrase affirmative action in March of 1961, when he put into effect Executive Order 10925. The order required every federal contract to include the pledge that The Contractor will not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because of race, creed, color, or national origin. The Contractor will take affirmative action, to ensure that applicants are employed, and that employees are treated during employment, without regard to their race, creed, color, or national origin. However, in 1965 President Lyndon B. Johnson felt that in order to achieve fairness more was need than just a commitment to imparti ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, john f kennedy, president lyndon, racial
  • Aids Related Stigma Since The Appearance Of Aids In The Late Seventies And Early Eighties, The Disease Has Had Attached To It - 1,545 words
    AIDS Related Stigma Since the appearance of AIDS in the late seventies and early eighties, the disease has had attached to it a significant social stigma. This stigma has manifested itself in the form of discrimination, avoidance and fear of people living with AIDS (PLWAs). As a result, the social implications of the disease have been extended from those of other life threatening conditions to the point at which PLWAs are not only faced with a terminal illness but also social isolation and constant discrimination throughout society. Various explanations have been suggested as to the underlying causes of this stigmatization. Many studies point to the relationship the disease has with deviant ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, early years, seventies, stigma
  • Alternative Cinema - 1,482 words
    ... own reality. The actors use exaggerated gestures to externalise the characters emotions. The audience discovers the characters emotions without being sucked into the world that the characters inhabit. This style of acting was seen as a response to method acting, a style developed by Stanislavsky between 1910 and 1920 and taken up by actors such as Marlon Brando and Dustin Hoffman in modern cinema. German expressionism used the actors as an extension of the sets, making a psychological link between the two. The expressionist movement was clearly an alternative to the mainstream and was similar in many ways to Brechts epic theatre and in that respect can be called alternative cinema. Howe ...
    Related: cinema, world cinema, bertolt brecht, dustin hoffman, jean
  • Animal Farm As Animal Satire - 2,302 words
    Animal Farm as Animal Satire Let American Consumer Counseling Help you Get Out of Debt! Animal Farm as Animal Satire This study aims to determine that George Orwell's Animal Farm is a political satire which was written to criticise totalitarian regimes and particularly Stalin's practices in Russia. In order to provide background information that would reveal causes led Orwell to write Animal Farm, Chapter one is devoted to a brief summary of the progress of author's life and significant events that had impact on his political convictions. Chapter one also presents background information about Animal Farm. Chapter two is devoted to satire. In this chapter, definition of satire is presented an ...
    Related: animal farm, farm, satire, spanish civil, nikita khrushchev
  • Animal Farm: Animal Satire - 2,305 words
    Animal Farm: Animal Satire A Research Paper Table Of ContentS ABSTRACT i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ii 1. CHAPTER THE AUTHOR: GEORGE ORWELL 1 1.1. PRESENTATION 1 1.2. HIS LIFE 1 1.3. HIS TIME: POLITICAL BACKGROUND 4 1.3.1. THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION 5 1.3.2. THE SPANISH CIVIL WAR 7 1.4. ORWELL AND THE SPANISH CIVIL WAR 8 1.5. ANIMAL FARM 9 2. CHAPTER SATIRE 13 2.1. PRESENTATION 13 2.2. WHAT IS SATIRE? 13 2.2.1. DEFINITION 13 2.2.2. CHARACTERISTICS OF SATIRE 14 2.2.3. TECHNIQUES OF SATIRE 17 3. CHAPTER METHOD OF RESEARCH 19 3.1. PRESENTATION 19 3.2. PROCEDURE 19 4. CHAPTER ANIMAL FARM AS SATIRE 21 4.1. PRESENTATION 21 4.2. ELEMENTS OF SATIRE IN ANIMAL FARM 21 4.2.1. SUMMARY OF THE PLOT 22 4.2.2. SATIRICAL ...
    Related: animal farm, satire, eric arthur blair, capitalist system, frederick
  • Anthropology - 1,269 words
    Anthropology Transcending the Barriers "My primary interest is to explain something out there that impinges me, and I would sell my soul to the devil if I thought it would help." Eric Wolf, 1987. Eric Wolf's interest into the realm of anthropology emerged upon recognition of the theorist- imposed boundaries, encompassing both theories and subjects, which current and past anthropological scholars had constructed. These boundaries, Wolf believed, were a result of theorist tending to societies and cultures as fixed entitiesstatic, bounded and autonomous, rather then describing and interpreting societies within a state of constant change, ceaselessly vulnerable to external influence, and always ...
    Related: anthropology, karl marx, los angeles, paying attention, rigid
  • Assyrian Art - 1,110 words
    Assyrian Art Assyrian Art The reliefs from the palace of King Assurnasirpal II at Nimrud play an important role in portraying the power and importance of the Assyrian king. These reliefs are similar to other Assyrian reliefs in terms of their purpose; however, there is a contrast in the methods used to glorify the king. By examining such factors as style, iconography and historical significance, we find many similarities and differences between the "ceremonial" reliefs and the more common reliefs depicting war and hunting. The reliefs belonging to the sacred or"ceremonial" category consist of panels depicting a sacred tree, a human headed genius fertilizing a sacred tree, a griffin fertilizi ...
    Related: assyrian, historical significance, art history, methods used, deity
  • Communication And Race - 1,175 words
    Communication And Race The most critical aspects of media performance with regards to race and ethnicity are issues that relate to the quality of its representation of the lives of people of color. Accuracy and diversity are aspects of media performance that will allow for a careful evaluation of how it represents people of color. Evaluating media performance is important because of the utilization and reliance on the mass media for much of society's reflexive monitoring and evaluation of reality. The performance of mass media is important in regards to race and ethnicity because the mass media are the primary source of indirect or mediated experiences that reinforce racial attitudes and bel ...
    Related: race and ethnicity, public interest, personal identity, social policy, regard
  • Dangerous Liaisons Vs Cruel Intentions - 1,309 words
    Dangerous Liaisons Vs. Cruel Intentions It is my intention to compare the book, Dangerous Liaisons by Choderlos de Laclos, to its modern movie version, Cruel Intentions starring Sarah Michelle Gellar. I intend to examine how the original French text was modified in reference to plot, character, morals/values, and themes. I also plan to discuss how these transformations change the meaning of the story and reflect different cultural/historical contexts. There are some major differences between these two works, if only because of when they were written. First, the plots of both works need to be discussed and explained how they are different. The stories of both works have basically the same str ...
    Related: cruel, cruel intentions, liaisons, eighteenth century, penguin classics
  • Development Of Psychology - 964 words
    Development Of Psychology John Wilson Psychology Essay (Development of psychology) In the following essay I will explain the development of major schools in terms of distinguishing features and historical context. Scientific study is a valid way of coming to an understanding of life, and can be very useful in every area of life. Science develops theories based on what is observed. It examines each theory with rigorous and scrupulous tests to see if it describes reality. The scientific method works well in observing and recording physical data and in reaching conclusions which either confirm or nullify a theory. During the mid-19th century, scholars (although at that time probably termed phil ...
    Related: cognitive psychology, human psychology, psychology, social psychology, psychological aspects
  • Dietrich Bonhoeffers Interpretation Of Ot - 1,773 words
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer's Interpretation Of OT In reviewing the works of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, the study of the Old Testament seems to be almost non-existent. It is not until his time in Tegel Prison, nearly one year prior to his execution, that he fully commits himself to serious thought on the subject "My thoughts and feelings seem to be getting more and more like those of the Old Testament, and in recent months I have been reading the Old Testament much more than the New (Bonhoeffer, Letters, 156)." Though his Old Testament study was fairly dicey and incomplete, the contributions of his interpretation have been tremendous. Bonhoeffers distinct Christological approach to the Old Testament may n ...
    Related: dietrich, interpretation, good and evil, king david, authors
  • Excellence, Popularity, Typicality Discuss The Relative Merits Of Each Of These As A Basis For The Inclusion Of Films In A Fi - 1,414 words
    'Excellence', 'Popularity', 'Typicality' - Discuss The Relative Merits Of Each Of These As A Basis For The Inclusion Of Films In A Film History 'Excellence', 'popularity', 'typicality' - discuss the relative merits of each of these as a basis for the inclusion of films in a film history Any attempt to study film history requires the consideration of films, which occur within the categories of excellence, popularity and typicality. They are three very different approaches to film history; 'excellence' covering films recognised as having artistic merit, 'popularity' covering films which have been financially or sociologically successful and 'typicality', films which are classed as mainstream d ...
    Related: cannes film festival, film history, films, horror films, inclusion, relative
  • From Unilineal Cultural Evolution To Functionalism - 1,037 words
    From Unilineal Cultural Evolution To Functionalism Several anthropological theories emerged during the early twentieth century. Arguably, the most important of these was Functionalism. Bronislaw Malinowski was a prominent anthropologist in Britain during that time and had great influence on the development of this theory. Malinowski suggested that individuals have certain physiological needs and that cultures develop to meet those needs. Malinowski saw those needs as being nutrition, reproduction, shelter, and protection from enemies. He also proposed that there were other basic, culturally derived needs and he saw these as being economics, social control, education, and political organizati ...
    Related: cultural evolution, evolution, functionalism, ruth benedict, social environment
  • Geopolitics - 1,575 words
    ... barrel infected by one rotten one, the corruption of Greece would infect Iran and all to the east. It would also carry infection to Africa through Asia Minor and Egypt, and to Europe through Italy, France, already threatened by the strongest domestic Communist parties in Western Europe (Acheson, 1969). Presenting "apples in a barrel" is a mark of excessive pride in the American intellectuals of statecraft with the Truman administration. Thus when Truman declares in his speech that it is "necessary only to glance at a map," the map he has in his mind is one where states are equivalent to dominoes about to fall. Only physical proximity is seen as geography and nothing else. The geopolitica ...
    Related: geopolitics, third world, soviet military, military technology, rapid
  • Government - 2,325 words
    GOVERNMENT Government can not exactly be described as an industry segment but it has significant effect on the rest of the industry in every segment. Due to this big effect, we agreed that the two major effects of the government come in the form of Medicare and Medicaid. These two programs effect millions of people and eventually the health industry overall. Analyzing these programs that are very complex and intertwined with each other was a complex job. Even though we tried our best to separate them as two different segments, many problems are similar. We believe this information is essential while analyzing the rest of the industry. MEDICARE AND MEDICAID A) MEDICARE HISTORICAL CONTEXT Medi ...
    Related: federal government, cost containment, short term, health maintenance, discretionary
  • Hamlet: Tragedy In Hamlet - 1,947 words
    Hamlet: Tragedy in Hamlet The tradition of literature includes many genres. One of the oldest and most important of these genres is tragedy; one of the foremost Elizabethan tragedies in the canon of English literature is Hamlet by William Shakespeare and one of the earliest critics of tragedy is Aristotle. One way to measure Shakespeare's work is to appraise it using the methods of classical critics and thereby to see how if it would have retained its meaning. Hamlet is one of the most recognizable and most often quoted tragedies in the all of English literature. Aristotle, is concerned with the proper presentation of tragic plays and poetry. Aristotle defines tragedy as: "...a representatio ...
    Related: greek tragedy, hamlet, hamlet shakespeare, tragedy, samuel johnson
  • Hamlet: Tragedy In Hamlet - 1,947 words
    Hamlet: Tragedy in Hamlet The tradition of literature includes many genres. One of the oldest and most important of these genres is tragedy; one of the foremost Elizabethan tragedies in the canon of English literature is Hamlet by William Shakespeare and one of the earliest critics of tragedy is Aristotle. One way to measure Shakespeare's work is to appraise it using the methods of classical critics and thereby to see how if it would have retained its meaning. Hamlet is one of the most recognizable and most often quoted tragedies in the all of English literature. Aristotle, is concerned with the proper presentation of tragic plays and poetry. Aristotle defines tragedy as: "...a representatio ...
    Related: greek tragedy, hamlet, hamlet shakespeare, tragedy, historical context
  • Historical Truth - 694 words
    Historical Truth All of human history is a collaboration of truth. In it, emotion and rationality fight each other in a bitter struggle for supremacy. The outcome remains in doubt still to this day, however, as evidence of both individual and institutional involve- ment contribute towards this subtle yet potent friction. Institutions are the founda- tion of the house of social order while individuals roam free throughout the house itself. History teaches us that humanity grows and becomes strengthened by diver- sity and a common understanding of the dangers of indifference. Truth, which is the essence of human history is often manipulated to serve individual interests for the achievement of ...
    Related: historical context, social institutions, human history, falls apart, spite
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