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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: hippie movement

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  • The Politics And Culture Of The 1960s Hippie Movement - 1,121 words
    The Politics And Culture Of The 1960S Hippie Movement The Politics and Culture of the 1960s Hippie Movement As the nineteen fifties turned into the early sixties, the United States remained the same patriotic, harmonious society of the previous decade; often a teen's most difficult decision was choosing what color lipstick to wear to the prom. Yet after 1963, a dramatic change slowly developed in the cultural, social, and political beliefs of America, particularly the youth. The death of President Kennedy, the new music, the quest for civil rights, the popularity of mind-altering drugs, the senselessness of the Vietnam War, and the invention of the birth control pill reacted like an imbalanc ...
    Related: civil rights movement, hippie, hippie movement, rights movement, lyndon johnson
  • The Politics And Culture Of The 1960s Hippie Movement - 1,111 words
    ... e of the most famous rock bands on earth, as well talented amateurs looking for a start. An attendee described it as: Three days of love, peace, and rock! (Thompson 89). The concert epitomized the music and, indirectly, the hippie lifestyle of the sixties, and paved the way for the more diverse, drugged-up musical style of the early seventies. Illicit drugs were a prominent influence on hippie lifestyle and culture. By the mid-sixties, LSD and marijuana had overtaken America overnight. These hallucinogens were a social activity at least experimented with by virtually every groovy teenager in America. Numerous books were written both condemning and justifying the new drug phenomena. Drug ...
    Related: hippie, hippie movement, martin luther king jr, national organization, justifying
  • 60s Music Influence On Our Society - 1,930 words
    60'S Music Influence On Our Society Sixties Music and How it Reflected the Changing Times Chris Montaigne Professor Shao Rhetoric II The 1960's in the United States was a decade marred by social unrest, civil rights injustice, and violence both home and abroad. These were some of the factors that lead to a cultural revolution. The revolution attempted to diverge the fabric of American society. Teenagers were living dangerously and breaking away from the ideals that their parents held. In the process they created their own society (Burns 1990). They were young and had the nerve to believe that they could change the world. Their leaders had lofty goals as well. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had d ...
    Related: american society, folk music, music, popular music, rock music, woodstock music
  • Am Waking From The Dreamerica In The 60s - 1,484 words
    Am Waking From The Dreamerica In The 60'S The presidential election 1960 was between John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon. The race was close-so close that no one could give even an educated guess of who would win, that is until the televised debated came out. After the debated Kennedy took the lead. This may have been the 1st time America voted mostly on appearance. On January 20, 1961 John F. Kennedy gave his Inaugural address-which was dedicated to the teens of the time. Kennedy believed in the teens and the rest of America started doing the same. Advertisers realized that teens were the ones they should be targeting. By making teens and children believe they "needed" a product was the way t ...
    Related: waking, next president, civil rights, first year, sorrow
  • Art Imitating Life Imitating Art - 1,038 words
    Art Imitating Life Imitating Art The late 1950s saw a new movement in the art world this became known as "pop art" due to the fact that the artists in this movement with this movement manly Andy Warhol and Roy Lichensten of the unites states as well as David Hockney and Derek Boshier of Great Britain, used elements of popular culture as main sources of their work. A good example of this is Warhole's screen prints of Marilyn Manroe, where he took a famous icon of the time and used a mass production technique to make her into a work of art. Lichenstine looked at a different element of popular culture / youth culture- comic books. He used this style of painting and drawing to create a comic str ...
    Related: everyday life, andy warhol, great britain, hippie movement, branch
  • Charles Manson - 1,361 words
    Charles Manson Charles Manson is known as one of the most sinister and evil criminals of all time. He organized the murders that shocked the world and his name still strikes fear into American hearts. Mansons childhood, personality, and uncanny ability to control people led to the creation of a family-like cult and ultimately to the bloody murders of numerous innocent people. Charles M. Manson was born in Cincinnati, Ohio on November 11, 1934. His mother, Kathleen Maddox, was a teenage prostitute. Mansons father walked out on the still pregnant Maddox, never to be seen again. In order to give her bastard son a name, Ms. Maddox married William Manson. He soon abandoned the both of them. Manso ...
    Related: charles manson, manson, probation officer, young women, foster
  • Compare And Contrast - 970 words
    Compare And Contrast Bridging the Generation Gap Between Teens in the 60s and Teens in the 90s Throughout history many generations have been named after something that describes them in every way. The decade from 1960 to 1970 is definitely one of those eras and it became known as the Counter Culture Era (The Hippie Generation). It was known as the Counter Culture Era because the young people involved in it rejected the old-fashioned American values and lifestyles. The youth was no longer satisfied with being replicas of the generation that preceded them. Instead, young people longed for change. The changes affected lifestyles, values, laws, education, and entertainment. The dream of love, pe ...
    Related: compare, compare and contrast, contrast, social issues, transmitted diseases
  • History Of The Grateful Dead - 1,929 words
    ... zmann had been working at. They began to work on a set of cover tunes, which are songs already written by a previous artists. The Warlocks began to get discouraged because of their lack of gigs, but they never even thought about giving up. Their first gig was a pizza parlor which they played three nights every other week. Eventually, word got out because of their unique rock n' roll blues sounding music and other gigs were calling. The original set up of the Warlocks didn't last long because Garcia asked their bass player Dana Morgan to leave and hired his friend of long time named Phil Lesh. Although Lesh had never actually played the bass, Garcia knew he was a talented musician, so the ...
    Related: history, san francisco, city state, drug treatment, performers
  • Political And Social Effects That Shaped The 60s Generation - 1,585 words
    Political And Social Effects That Shaped The 60'S Generation Massive black rebellions, constant strikes, gigantic anti-war demonstrations, draft resistance, Cuba, Vietnam, Algeria, a cultural revolution of seven hundred million Chinese, occupations, red power, the rising of women, disobedience and sabotage, communes & marijuana: amongst this chaos, there was a generation of youths looking to set their own standard - to fight against the establishment, which was oppressing them, and leave their mark on history. These kids were known as the hippies. There were many stereotypes concerning hippies; they were thought of as being pot smoking, freeloading vagabonds, who were trying to save the worl ...
    Related: political power, social change, social effects, cultural revolution, world politics
  • Political And Social Effects That Shaped The 60s Generation - 1,620 words
    ... main looters. The actions by Richard J. Daley, were a sign of respect of King. Ironically, a year before, Daley was against having King speak in the city of Chicago. Kings following had fallen off in the years leading up to his death. His moment had passed. Since the triumph of his Slema campaign, which climaxed in the 1965 Voting Rights Act, he had turned to the urban poor, but his strategy of nonviolence, national publicity, and coalition-building seemed unavailing. Just a week before his death, his hopes for a non violence march in Memphis, in support of striking garbage workers, had been dashed by the window-smashing of a few dozen black teenagers. King had become a hero without a s ...
    Related: political science, social change, social effects, world turned upside, american culture
  • Politics Of 1960s - 1,101 words
    ... ck bands on earth, as well talented amateurs looking for a start. An attendee described it as: "Three days of love, peace, and rock!" (Thompson 89). The concert epitomized the music and, indirectly, the hippie lifestyle of the sixties, and paved the way for the more diverse, "drugged-up" musical style of the early seventies. Illicit drugs were a prominent influence on hippie lifestyle and culture. By the mid-sixties, LSD and marijuana had overtaken America overnight. These hallucinogens were a social activity at least experimented with by virtually every "groovy" teenager in America. Numerous books were written both condemning and justifying the new drug phenomena. Drug proponents referr ...
    Related: aldous huxley, san francisco, martin luther, malcolm, artists
  • The Hippie Culture - 1,166 words
    The Hippie Culture The Hippie Culture Life in America has been molded by many factors including those of the hippie movement in the Sixties. With the development of new technology, a war against Communism, and an internal war against racial injustice, a change in America was sure to happen. As the children of the baby boom became young adults, they found far more discontent with the world around them. This lead to a subculture labeled as hippies, that as time went one merged into a mass society all its own. These people were upset about a war in Vietnam, skeptical of the present government and its associated authority, and searching for a place to free themselves from societys current norms, ...
    Related: hippie, hippie movement, baby boom, america today, sixties
  • The Melting Pot - 405 words
    The Melting Pot In the 1800s and the early 1900s, some people gave the America the name, the melting pot. People imagined this because thousands and thousands of immigrants coming from around the world were coming into the United States in hope of a better life. So most people imagined that all these different cultures were being poured into a giant pot called America, heated to a low boil and molded into one kind of person. If one steps back and thinks about this theory, it isnt entirely true. In fact, its not really true at all. If one takes a closer look at America today, one sees millions of people labeled Americans but not by how they act, what religions they practice and what kind of f ...
    Related: melting, melting pot, different cultures, american history, lettuce
  • Through Out History The World Has Seen Some Generations That Have - 1,890 words
    Through out history the world has seen some generations that have made an impact more than all of its predecessors. The decade from 1960 to 1970 was definitely one of those eras. The people didn't follow the teachings of its elders, but rejected them for an alternative culture which was their very own(Harris 14). Made up of the younger population of the time this new culture was such a radical society that they were given their own name which is still used today. They came to be called the Hippies. The Hippie movement started in San Francisco, California and spread across the United States, through Canada, and into parts of Europe (World Book). But it had its greatest influence in America. D ...
    Related: history, world book, middle class, rights movement, movies
  • Transcendentalism - 622 words
    Transcendentalism Transcendentalism is the belief that matters of ultimate reality transcend, or go beyond, human experience. Transcendentalist thinking began during the American Renaissance with writers like Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. However transcendental thinking did not begin with Thoreau and Emerson, but as Emerson called it, it is the very oldest of thoughts cast into the mold of these new times. Transcendentalism is based on the ancient philosophy of Idealism, which originates with Plato, a well-known philosopher from ancient Greece. Transcendentalism is an appropriate way of thinking for the period known as the American Renaissance because it puts one into a state ...
    Related: transcendentalism, political situation, ralph waldo emerson, waldo emerson, hawthorne
  • Transcendentalist Believes - 544 words
    Transcendentalist Believes Transcendentalism is a newly founded belief and practice that involves man's interaction with nature, and the idea that man belongs to one universal and benign omnipresence know as the oversoul. The term was first introduced by German philosopher Immanuel Kant, and was published in his "Critique of Practical Reasoning". The impressions of transcendentalism by the American people were sketchy and obscure, but as magazines and books were published on the topic the coterie of transcendentalist spread. The authors of the nineteenth century books, essays, and philosophies were a reflection of these beliefs such authors were Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and ...
    Related: henry david, american people, rural area, grace, kant
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