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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: high renaissance

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  • Baccio Della Porta - 1,766 words
    Baccio Della Porta Even the average person with little or no background in art may have heard the names Leonardo da Vinci, Michaelangelo, or Raphael. Not only because they are the most famous and noteworthy painters, sculptors, draughtsmen, designers, and inventors of the high renaissance, but also because of the countless stories and movies, fact and fiction which included these men and at least mentioned their importance, relevance, and influences on today'7s world. Many children have grown up already knowing these names, and perhaps that they were artists however simplistic that may be, after the explosion of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles in the late eighties. Perhaps there is one high ...
    Related: della, porta, high renaissance, body language, joining
  • Baroque Period - 1,490 words
    Baroque Period The Baroque Period The Baroque Art began in Italy between the sixteen hundreds and the seventeen hundreds. Classicism of the High Renaissance has been replenished during the Baroque period. During the Baroque period of art, the exploration of the fundamental components of the human nature and the realm of senses and emotions were very crucial. The Baroque era was very vast and dynamic, radiant and colorful, dramatic and intense, passionate and ardent, and sensual and overpowered by emotions. The superficial form of light was fascinated during this period due to the thoughts of godlike sun or the truth of the Holy Spirit. The Baroque naturalism maintains the religious themes in ...
    Related: baroque, baroque art, baroque period, human nature, breast feeding
  • Botticellis Spring - 991 words
    Botticelli's Spring The renaissance was a time of wonderful art, though one artist in particular stood out, that was Sandro Botticelli. This man created some of the most renowned pieces of art in European history; one great painting was Allegory of Spring. This mythological artwork was an amazing change from the normalcy of past times. Botticellis Allegory of Spring, painted in 1482, is one of the most remarkable and astounding pieces of renaissance art with the wondrous symbols, style, story of the piece and also the intriguing history of Botticelli himself. Botticelli is considered one of the greatest artists of the Renaissance; one of his finest works was Allegory of Spring. Botticelli, o ...
    Related: sandro botticelli, spring, sistine chapel, ancient roman, platonic
  • El Greco - 1,808 words
    El Greco The Agony In the Garden, a mannerist style of art by EL Greco, proclaims a sense of spiritual power of religious faith which accomplishes El Grecos aim to move his audience. El Greco was born on the island of Crete and lived from 1541 to 1614. He represented the most characteristic figure of Spanish Mannerism. El Greco was influenced by and became acquainted with the art of Titian and Jacopo Bassano in Venice where he studied in 1566. In addition to visiting Italy, El Greco made his way to Rome, Parma and probably Florence. On his travels he became more familiar with the work of Parmigianino and the work of Correggio. In El Grecos use of form can be seen Florentine Mannerism. Veneti ...
    Related: el greco, greco, religious faith, subject matter, bare
  • Gentle Giants - 1,363 words
    Gentle Giants Michelangelo and Renaissance Religion Michelangelo Buonarroti lived in a time when the medieval aspects of Christianity were overwhelmed by the upheaval of the Reformation. His art portrays this change in religious philosophy by discerning the major trends and objectives of the Renaissance. His works show us...the changing world around him (Richmond 4). In addition, Michelangelo seriously impacted generations of artists to come. The Renaissance was a rebirth that led to new ways of thinking in the sciences, philosophy, and architecture, as well as painting and sculpture (Spence 6). This period of European history, beginning in the fourteenth-century, saw a renewed interest in t ...
    Related: gentle, giants, michelangelo buonarroti, florence italy, flame
  • Giotto And The Epiphany - 415 words
    Giotto And The Epiphany The artist I chose for my work was Giotto and his artwork The Epiphany. Giotto was one of the great artists during the period of Renaissance. The painting of the Giotto The Epiphany is about the birth of Jesus. The material used in this painting is tempera on wood. It is painted on to wooden panel with gold ground. Tempera is an egg-based paint, which help the painting look shinier and long lasting. There were many things, which I learned about Giotto, which I was unaware during my research. I found out when Giotto was born and when he die where was he born. I found out that Giotto talent was discovered by Cimabue and he was the teacher of Giotto and how Cimabue suppo ...
    Related: epiphany, giotto, great artists, public works, artist
  • Introduction To The Visual Arts - 879 words
    Introduction to the Visual Arts Throughout history art has played an intricate role in society's perception of life. Art is used as form of expressionism be it physical or emotional, religious or the mockery of religion. The birth of new artistic eras were due to the technological advancements of the world. Below are a few examples of works of art that from different era in our humanity. Francisco de Stefano's, named Pesellino during the renaissance, A Miracle of Saint Silvester is a scene representative of an episode of Saint Silvester's life who was pope during the reign of Constantine the Great. Originally this work forms the lower portion of an altarpiece. The scene may be recognized as ...
    Related: arts, renaissance art, visual, visual arts, doctor who
  • Issues Of Mannerism - 1,777 words
    Issues Of Mannerism Issues of Mannerism The movement in painting that is now referred to as Mannerism began in Italy around 1520, influenced artists throughout Europe, and lasted until the end of the 16th century. The word Mannerism originates from the Italian word maniera which translates into the English word style. The basis of Mannerism then is style; its a period of art where the focus was on grace and beauty. While preceding trends of Renaissance art looked to nature to find their style, working to perfect it, Mannerists manipulated nature creating a gross perfection of human form, idealizing forms to the point of abstraction. Definitions of Mannerist art as well as the reasons for its ...
    Related: mannerism, renaissance art, primary colors, human body, grace
  • Leonardo Da Vinci - 1,209 words
    ... resco makes areas of color appear quite distinct. Unfortunately, his experiment was unsuccessful; the paint did not adhere well to the wall, and within 50 years the scene was reduced to a confused series of spots. What we see today is largely a later reconstruction, but the design is reliable and remarkable. The scene seems at first to be one of tumultuous activity, in response to the dramatic stimulus of Christ's words One of you will betray me, which is a contrast to the traditional static row of figures. But the 12 disciples form four equal clusters around Christ, isolated as a fifth unit in the middle. Thus, Leonardo once again enriches the empirical observation of vital activity but ...
    Related: leonardo, leonardo da vinci, vinci, human anatomy, mona lisa
  • Leonardo Da Vinci - 1,339 words
    Leonardo Da Vinci Leonardo DA Vinci (1452-1519), Florentine artist, one of the great masters of high Renaissance, celebrated as a painter, sculptor, architect, engineer, and scientist. His profound love of knowledge and research was the keynote of both his scientific and artistic endeavors. His innovations in the field of painting influenced the course of Italian art for more than a century after his death, and his scientific studies, particularly in the fields of anatomy, optics, and hydraulics. He anticipated many of the developments of modern science. Leonardo was born in the small town of Vinci, in Tuscany, near Florence. He was the son of a wealthy Florentine notary and a peasant woman. ...
    Related: leonardo, leonardo da vinci, vinci, vinci leonardo, european history
  • Leonardo Da Vinci - 260 words
    Leonardo Da Vinci Leonardo da Vinci was one of the greatest inventor-scientist of recorded history. His genius was unbounded by time and technology, and was driven by his insatiable curiosity, and his intuitive sense of the laws of nature. Da Vinci was dedicated to discovery of truth and the mysteries of nature, and his insightful contributions to science and technology were legendary. As the archetypical Renaissance man, Leonardo helped set an ignorant and superstitous world on a course of reason, science, learning, and tolerance. He was an internationally renowned inventor, scientists, engineer, architect, painter, sculptor, musician, mathematician, anatomist, astronomer, geologists, biolo ...
    Related: leonardo, leonardo da vinci, vinci, vinci leonardo, the duke
  • Michelangelo Buonarroti Was Born March 6, 1475 In The Small Village Of Caprese, Italy A Sculptor, Architect, Painter, And Poe - 771 words
    Michelangelo Buonarroti was born March 6, 1475 in the small village of Caprese, Italy. A sculptor, architect, painter, and poet that did his work in the Italian high renaissance. Michelangelo's father, Ludovico Buonarroti had connection to the prominent Medici family. He studies at the gardens when he was 15 years old and was invited into the household of Lorenzo de' Medici, the magnificent. Michelangelo's future was shaped to a large degree by his life in Lorenzo's household. When Lorenzo died in 1942 at the age of 43, Michelangelo designed the tombs for Lorenzo as well as his brother, Guiliano de Medici. The two complex tombs were conceived as representing opposite types. Lorenzo's, the co ...
    Related: buonarroti, italy, michelangelo, michelangelo buonarroti, village
  • Michelangelo Was One Of The Greatest Artists Of All Time He Excelled In Architecture, Sculpture, Painting, Poetry, And Engine - 1,624 words
    Michelangelo was one of the greatest artists of all time. He excelled in architecture, sculpture, painting, poetry, and engineering. He was a true Renaissance man who lived a long emotional life. In painting The Last Judgment, Michelangelo was able to incorporate all that he had learned about the human body. He was able to show the way the body moved, as well as it's displays of unrestrained passion, overwhelming grief, or endless torment. This is what makes The Last Judgment such a unique and exceptional work of art. In the spring of 1534, Michelangelo received a commission from Clement VII to paint The Last Judgment on the altar wall of the Sistine Chapel. He was also commissioned at this ...
    Related: artists, engine, michelangelo, sistine chapel, the chosen
  • Michelangelo Was Pessimistic In His Poetry And An Optimist In His Artwork Michelangelos Artwork Consisted Of Paintings And Sc - 1,472 words
    Michelangelo was pessimistic in his poetry and an optimist in his artwork. Michelangelo's artwork consisted of paintings and sculptures that showed humanity in it's natural state. Michelangelo's poetry was pessimistic in his response to Strazzi even though he was complementing him. Michelangelo's sculpture brought out his optimism. Michelangelo was optimistic in completing The Tomb of Pope Julius II and persevered through it's many revisions trying to complete his vision. Sculpture was Michelangelo's main goal and the love of his life. Since his art portrayed both optimism and pessimism, Michelangelo was in touch with his positive and negative sides, showing that he had a great and stable pe ...
    Related: artwork, consisted, michelangelo, michelangelo buonarroti, optimist, pessimistic, poetry
  • Raffaello Sanzio - 1,053 words
    Raffaello Sanzio annon During a time when Michelangelo and Leonardo Da Vinci were the prime artists in Europe, a young man by the name of Raffaello Sanzio was starting to attract major attention with his artworks. The Italian high renaissance was marked by paintings expressing human grandeur and very humanistic values. No one better portrayed the Italian high Renaissance then Raphael Sanzio, with his painting’s clarity and ease of composition, Raphael was easily one of the greatest painters of this period. Born in an artistically influenced town in Italy called Urbino, Raffaello Sanzio was first taught by his father, Giovanni Santi, how to compose works of art at a very early age. At th ...
    Related: saint peter, pope julius, italian high, energetic, realistic
  • Science And Inventions - 1,110 words
    Science And Inventions Leonardo Da Vinci is one of the greatest and most ingenious men that history has produced. His contributions in the areas of art, science, and humanity are still among the most important that a single man has put forth, definitely making his a life worth knowing. Da Vinci, born on April 15, 1452, is credited with being a master painter, sculptor, architect, musician, engineer, and scientist. He was born an illegitimate child to Catherina, a peasant girl. His father was Ser Piero da Vinci, a public notary for the city of Florence, Italy. For the first four years of his life he lived with his mother in the small village of Vinci, directly outside of the great center of t ...
    Related: science, high renaissance, florence italy, leonardo da vinci, italian
  • The Evolution Fo Renaissance Art - 1,321 words
    The Evolution Fo Renaissance Art The Renaissance was an era of beautiful artwork and structures that flourished all over Western Europe. The artists began to be more expressive and creative in their designs. Art evolved by way of subject matter, technique, influences, and of course the artists. Some of the most noted artists, architects, and sculptors of the High Renaissance include Giotto, Donato Bramante, Leonardo Da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Raphael. It was one of the high points of humanism and the expression of creativity and beauty of life. During the period between 1350 to 1550, art changed and evolved through its subject matter. The subject matter of painting before the Renaissance wa ...
    Related: evolution, high renaissance, renaissance, renaissance art, paul gauguin
  • The Greatest Artist Has No Conception Which A Single Block Of Marble Does Not Potentially Contain Within Its Mass, But Only A - 1,040 words
    "The greatest artist has no conception which a single block of marble does not potentially contain within its mass, but only a hand obedient to the mind can penetrate to this image." ~ Michelangelo Buonarroti Michelangelo describes in the above quote what it is like to carve a likeness of a person out of a large block of marble. As we know from seeing his work, he did an excellent job with this task. Bernini did just as fine a job on his, but in a much different way as you will see in the following pages. Michelangelo Michelangelo was born on March 6, 1475, in Caprese, Italy, a tiny village, owned by the nearby city-state of Florence. His father was the mayor. He attended school in Florence, ...
    Related: artist, block, conception, marble, potentially
  • The Reasons Underlying European Expansion And Exploration - 1,240 words
    The Reasons Underlying European Expansion and Exploration The Reasons Underlying European Expansion and Exploration It remains unclear why humanity chose a relatively spontaneous moment to matriculate from the sheltered semicircle of Mediterranean lands, to expand to the farthest reaches of the earth, with an inchoate disregard for personal welfare. However, pretentious man feels the need to speculate and impart drivelous reason, vain though it be: What were the causes of European expansion? An anonymous author proffers this model conjecture, "Western Europes outward expansion in the 15th and 16th centuries was caused primarily by the unique brand of centralized governments which developed i ...
    Related: european expansion, expansion, exploration, underlying, francis drake
  • Titians Altarpieces In The Church Of The Frari, Venice - 1,318 words
    Titian's Altarpieces In The Church Of The Frari, Venice Titians Pesaro and Assunta. Altarpieces in the church of the Frari, Venice. What was the importance of these two altarpieces for the development of painting in Venice, both from a stylistic and iconographic point of view? It has been said that Titians Assunta, which adorns the high altar, and Pesaro (on the left aisle of the chapel of the Immaculate Conception) stand mid-way between the past and the future of Venetian painting. This infers that Titian drew on established traditions learnt from his masters Bellini and Giorgione, and imbued his works with a freshness and inspiration not seen before. Furthermore, it becomes apparent that h ...
    Related: christian church, venice, art history, virgin mary, bias
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