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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: heroine

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  • Heroine Or Victim Of Pride - 907 words
    Heroine Or Victim Of Pride Heroism is defined by cause. Bravery is a factor, however, it depends on what one is putting oneself out on a limb for that makes one a hero. It is not enough to be brave. Antigones character has many different layers. In some respects, she is a heroine, but in others, she is merely a victim of her own pride. At the beginning of the play, the chorus describes Antigone as a little helpless creature that keeps to herself, and is in the shadow of her beautiful sister, Ismene. They describe Antigone as: That thin little creature sitting by herself, staring straight ahead, seeing nothing. . . She seems to be small, helpless and fragile, but just when you think that she ...
    Related: heroine, pride, right thing, young girl, haemon
  • Medea As A Heroine - 498 words
    Medea As A Heroine In Euripides' Medea, the main character of the same name is a controversial heroine. Medea takes whatever steps necessary to achieve what she believes is right and fair. She lived in a time when women were expected to sit in the shadows and take the hand that life dealt them without a blink of their eye. Medea took very radical steps to liberate herself and destroys the life of the man who ruined hers. She refused to accept the boundaries that a patriarchal society set upon her. Medea was a very wise and calculated woman who was brave enough to leave her homeland, along with everything she knew and loved, in order to follow her heart down the path of what she expected to b ...
    Related: euripides medea, heroine, medea, main character, golden fleece
  • My Holy Heroine - 282 words
    My Holy Heroine My Holy Heroine When I think of a holy heroine, I think of my mother. What is a heroine? Everyone's vision is somewhat different. To me, a heroine is someone who I can look up to as a role model. This is why I consider her to be my holiest heroine. Raised in Brooklyn, my mother learned to accept what she had. Growing up, she took on many responsibilities. She coped with the fact that she was unable to live a work-free life. After funding her own education, she graduated college and married my father. Two years later she gave birth to her first daughter, me; who as I grew up, learned that I had someone on my side. I think of my mother as someone I can trust. She is someone who ...
    Related: heroine, holy, role model, funding, brooklyn
  • Was Antigone A Tragic Heroine - 710 words
    Was Antigone A Tragic Heroine? Was Antigone a Tragic Heroine? Tragedy, to be at its finest, requires a complex, not a simple, structure, and its structure should also imitate fearful and pitiful events. These words of wisdom come from the great philosopher Aristotle. Antigone, written by Sophocles, exemplifies Aristotles definition of tragedy, and more precise the tragic heroine. Antigone the main character/heroine in this tragic tale, risks her life to bury her brother Polyneices. As she pleased the Gods, she was punished by family member and king, Creon. Antigone parallels Aristotles definition of a tragic heroine because she attains a fatal flaw, and instills fear and pity into the audien ...
    Related: antigone, heroine, tragic, king creon, family member
  • A Good Man Is Hard To Find O Conner - 1,085 words
    ... the back window. He waved. 'He didn't have any britches on,' June Star said. 'He probably didn't have any,' the grandmother explained. 'Little niggers in the country don't have things like we do. If I could paint that picture,' she said. The grandmother's pretty picture is ruined when the little boy shows his bum to her. The old women's attempt to look beyond a blatant reality and make it pretty is being mocked by O'Connor. The author has blended the line between the satirical and the lyrical to form a beauty that would not be considered a standard pretty picture. The same blending of the satirical and the lyrical occurs later in the story with the children playing with Red Sammy's monke ...
    Related: conner, good man is hard to find, facing death, john wesley, heroine
  • A Patriarchal World Assimilation - 1,578 words
    A Patriarchal World --Assimilation A Patriarchal World John Bodnar says it well when he suggests that the center of everyday life was to be found in the family-household. It was here that past values and present realities were reconciled, examined on an intelligible scale, evaluated and mediated. This assertion implies that the immigrant family-household is the vehicle of assimilation. I will take this assertion a step further and examine more specifically the powerful role of the patriarchal father within Anzia Yezierska's book Bread Givers and Barry Levinson's film Avalon. Yezierska's theme vividly depicts the constraint of a patriarchal world, while Levinson illustrates the process of ass ...
    Related: assimilation, old world, patriarchal, jewish american, more important
  • Africanamerican Representation In The Media - 1,845 words
    African-American Representation In The Media In Jacqueline Bobo's article, The Color Purple : Black Women as Cultural Readers, she discusses the way in which black women create meaning out of the mainstream text of the film The Color Purple. In Leslie B. Innis and Joe R. Feagin's article, The Cosby Show : The View From the Black Middle Class, they are examining black middle-class responses to the portrayal of black family life on The Cosby Show. In their respective articles, Bobo, and Innis and Feagin are investigating the representation of race, particularly African American race, in the mass media. The chief concerns of their investigations lie in how African Americans deal with the way th ...
    Related: mainstream media, mass media, media, representation, working women
  • Amelia Earhart - 1,195 words
    Amelia Earhart Amelia Mary Earhart was born on July 24, 1897 in Atchison, Kansas. She was the daughter of a railroad attorney and had a younger sister named Muriel. Amelia was a tomboy and was always interested in learning. She was educated at Columbia University and Harvard Summer School. She taught English to immigrant factory workers. During World War I, Amelia was a volunteer in a Red Cross hospital. Amelia heard of a woman pilot, Neta Snook, who gave flying lessons. She had her first lesson on January 2, 1921. On July 24, 1921, Amelia bought her first plane, a prototype of the Kinner airplane and named it "The Canary." In 1928, she accepted the invitation of the American pilots Wilmer S ...
    Related: amelia, amelia earhart, earhart, los angeles, physical evidence
  • American Hero - 1,078 words
    ... as known around the world for his writing of adventures through space, he once again electrified the movies screens and book stands with his Indiana Jones Trilogy." (Planet Indy NP) "The first book and movie in the series is Raiders of the Lost Ark. Readers and viewers find Indiana Jones in the Peruvian jungle in 1936, running a booby-trapped gauntlet to fetch a solid gold idol" (Planet Indy NP). Indiana puts himself in danger in order to achieve the task at hand He retains the artifact only to lose it to his chief rival, Belloq. This begins the story of Indiana Jones and his quest for the long-lost Ark of the Covenant. But during his search Indy is meet by the Nazis. Hitler hopes to fin ...
    Related: american, american hero, primary goal, indian tribe, heroine
  • An Essay About The Scarlet Letter, Finding Ones Own Truth - 626 words
    An Essay About The Scarlet Letter, Finding One's Own Truth The Scarlet Letter Nathaniel Hawthorne uses diction and symbolism to show the negative effects of stifling conformity verses the positive empowerment found in embarrassing ones own truth. He tries to impress upon his readers that an outsider whether from another physical location, or simply someone who thinks and acts outside that societys definition of acceptable behavior can in fact facilitate positive change within that society regardless of the generation or society. The secret in this novel most likely represents an idea, privacy, or even social censure. The Mary-like character Hester Prynne represents feminism, as the female-he ...
    Related: scarlet, scarlet letter, the scarlet letter, nathaniel hawthorne, worlds apart
  • Anabolic Steroids - 1,862 words
    Anabolic Steroids Anabolic Steroid Use in the Olympics Canadian track star Ben Johnson was denied his gold medal in the 1988 Olympics after he tested positive for anabolic steroids. This incident sparked worldwide attention to the extent of anabolic steroid use. To date, the International Olympic Committee has barred the use of seventeen anabolic steroids. Other organizations, including The National Football League, National Collegiate Athletic Associations International Amateur Athletic Federation, and the International Federation of Body Builders have followed suit. Athletes and non-athletes alike are still abusing anabolic steroids to excel in sports. Anabolic steroids belong to a group o ...
    Related: anabolic, anabolic steroids, steroid use, steroids, works cited
  • Anna Karenina - 1,352 words
    Anna Karenina Leo Tolstoy's novel, Anna Karenina, upon its release received a mix critical reception, with Russian critics either condemning or applauding the novel primarily on its views of Russian society. Thematically, the novel parallels its heroine's, Anna Karenina, moral and social conflicts with Constantin Levin's internal struggle to find the meaning of life. There are many others underlying themes which links the novel as a whole, yet many critics at the time only looked upon its critical view of Russian life. Henry James called Tolstoy's novels as "loose and baggy monsters' of stylessness, but Tolstoy stated of Anna Karenina ".....I am very proud of its architecture--its vaults are ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, karenina, leo tolstoy, true essence
  • Antigone - 1,273 words
    Antigone In ancient Greece, men who died in war fulfilled the civic ideal to the utmost. The women, destined to live out a degrading life, died in bed. Certainly, not all men died in battle, but every epitaph shows in one way or another, the city would always remember the men who died in war. Additionally, not all Athenian women died in bed; nonetheless, it was left to her family to preserve the memory of her not the city. No matter how perfect a woman was she would never receive the same status or level of social expectations from the city that a man received. No accomplishments were allowed beyond living a life of motherhood and submissiveness to a man, namely her husband. In fact, in earl ...
    Related: antigone, sophocles antigone, aggressive behavior, ancient greece, typically
  • Antigone - 1,049 words
    ... e law set forth by the gods. That law prohibits the burial of Antigones brother because he acted against his native country. It is the gods law that all soldiers have an appropriate and honorable burial. Although Creons law contradicts the gods, he sticks to his beliefs and does not alter them. Even when his niece, Antigone, defies his law, he carries through with the punishment, which is death. she is a traitor and must die, or else Id be a traitor too, and I will not break my promise to the state. I suppose shell claim that as my niece she should not be put to death, but if I exempt my family from the law, why should anyone else be subject to it? Its important to people to know that th ...
    Related: antigone, leadership qualities, turning back, leadership role, pause
  • Arcadia - 1,400 words
    Arcadia Throughout the play Arcadia by Tom Stoppard there is a distinct difference between the characters who have a science background and those who do not. One of the recurring themes is that those characters and actions of those characters which are against science often lead to conflict and disaster. Even those characters that are of logical thinking for the most part are prone to disaster when they let go of this rational thinking and give in to their irrational side. Bernard is a main character who is not a scientist and has basically no scientific background. From the moment he is introduced, he is portrayed as eccentric and odd. Here Bernard is described for the first time: Bernard, ...
    Related: arcadia, main character, personal view, tom stoppard, publishing
  • Arms And The Man - 1,251 words
    Arms And The Man Arms and the Man is one of George Bernard Shaws successfully written plays that have become predominant and globally renowned. Shaws play leads itself to two themes that people can relate to, which are the importance of war and the essentials to true love and marriage. These themes are interwoven, for Shaw believed that while war is evil and stupid, and marriage desirable and good, both had become wrapped in romantic illusions which led to disastrous wars and also to unhappy marriages.1 The theme of war applies itself into the plot within the first few pages of the melodrama, when the Bulgarians are at war with the Serbs. Romance is portrayed by the humorous and ironic relat ...
    Related: common sense, true love, young woman, impose, cars
  • Atwoods The Handmaids Tale: A Study Of Rebellion - 1,047 words
    Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale: A Study of Rebellion Rebels defy the rules of society, risking everything to retain their humanity. If the world Atwood depicts is chilling, if 'God is losing,' the only hope for optimism is a vision that includes the inevitability of human struggle against the prevailing order. -Joyce Johnson- Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale analyzes human nature by presenting an internal conflict in Offred: acceptance of current social trends (victim mentality) -vs- resistance for the sake of individual welfare and liberties (humanity). This conflict serves as a warning to society, about the dangers of the general acceptance of social evils and boldly illustrates the int ...
    Related: handmaids tale, margaret atwood, rebellion, internal conflict, little house
  • Awakening Eyes - 1,737 words
    Awakening Eyes Awakening Eyes With few exceptions, our male dominated society has traditionally feared, repressed, and stymied the growth of women. As exemplified in history, man has always enjoyed a superior position. According to Genesis in the Old Testament, the fact that man was created first has led to the perception that man should rule. However, since woman was created from man's rib, there is a strong argument that woman was meant to work along side with man as an equal partner. As James Weldon Johnson's poem, "Behold de Rib," clearly illustrates, if God had intended for woman to be dominated, then she would have been created from a bone in the foot, but "he took de bone out of his s ...
    Related: awakening, the awakening, their eyes were watching god, self determination, role model
  • Barbara Kingsolvers The Bean Trees - 968 words
    Barbara Kingsolver's The Bean Trees The Bean Trees: Lessons in Life Our paths never would have met if it weren't for a bent rocker arm. Such chance meetings are often the very events that turn a person's world upside down and set it on an entirely new course. Taylor Greer, plainclothes heroine of Barbara Kingsolver's first novel The Bean Trees (copyright 1988. 232 pages. Softcover, HarperPerennial. $11.00), leaves home to look for a better life, and has motherhood dropped in her lap at a roadside service station. Taylor (born Marietta) grew up in Pittman, Kentucky, a small rural town where families had kids just about as fast as they could fall down the well and drown, and a boy with a job a ...
    Related: barbara, bean, trees, cherokee nation, real life
  • Black Boy And Their Eyes Were Watching God - 1,878 words
    Black Boy And Their Eyes Were Watching God I. Abstract This paper examines the drastic differences in literary themes and styles of Richard Wright and Zora Neale Hurston, two African--American writers from the early 1900's. The portrayals of African-American women by each author are contrasted based on specific examples from their two most prominent novels, Native Son by Wright, and Their Eves Were Watching God by Hurston. With the intent to explain this divergence, the autobiographies of both authors (Black Boy and Dust Tracks on a Road) are also analyzed. Particular examples from the lives of each author are cited to demonstrate the contrasting lifestyles and experiences that created these ...
    Related: black boy, black woman, black women, most black, their eyes were watching god
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