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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: hebrews

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  • Subj: Biblical Prophesy Following The Exile Of The Hebrews From Babylon Title: The Minor Post Exilic Prophets Before The Baby - 1,924 words
    Subj: Biblical prophesy following the exile of the Hebrews from Babylon Title: The Minor Post Exilic Prophets Before the Babylonian exile, Biblical prophesy reached its highest point. Prophets such as Jeremiah and Ezekiel changed and molded the scope of Israelite religion. Their writings were intelligent, insightful, well developed, and contained a great spiritual meaning. Following the Babylonian exile, however, prophesy took a depressing downward turn. There are many post exilic prophets, yet their writings are usually short, mostly irrelevant, repetitive, and, for the most part, anonymous. Though this is the case for many of these prophets, their works cannot be overlooked. Haggai and Zec ...
    Related: babylon, biblical, exile, hebrews, prophets
  • The Hebrews - 1,058 words
    The Hebrews The ancient Middle East and Mesopotamia was largely a multicultural society composed of small, often insignificant kingdoms that were regularly torn between the forces of powerful empires, from Babylon to Egypt to Greece to Rome. One of these small kingdoms through its religion, philosophy, and law became one of the most important cultures in Middle Eastern and Western history. The word Hebrew appears to have been derived from the world Hiberu, which was found in writing sent to Egypt by one of the small states that Egypt had left behind when it withdrew from Canaan in the 1300s BC. These states were distressed by the arrival of nomadic tribes that came in waves across generation ...
    Related: hebrews, national identity, western history, children of israel, monotheism
  • A Comparison Of Judaism, Islam, Christianity - 1,507 words
    A Comparison Of Judaism, Islam, & Christianity Religion is one of the driving forces behind many of the events and attitudes that have shaped our world. Throughout the centuries, laws have been enacted; cities and countries have been created and destroyed; and wars have been fought, all to promulgate or protect one religion or another. This paper will examine aspects of the three major Western religions of the world: Judaism, Islam, and Christianity. Topics covered will include the origin of all three religions, the view of God held by each tradition, and conflicts. Several of the beliefs of these religions will be examined, such as judgment, and the Trinity. Origin of Judaism The origins of ...
    Related: christianity, christianity and islam, christianity religion, comparison, great religions
  • A Myriad Of Mysteries Is Contained In The Pages Of The Old Testament For Centuries, Scholars Of Theology, Archeology And Anth - 1,419 words
    A myriad of mysteries is contained in the pages of the Old Testament. For centuries, scholars of theology, archeology and anthropology have labored to produce some explanation of the contradictions and impossibilities put forth in these texts. The ancient ruins of lost cities reveal evidence that some writings may be incorrectly dated, or even that they may be false. Faith and tradition give way to speculation that the Bible may be nothing more than a collection of ancient Israelite mythology. Some things, however, prove tantalizingly true. Temple Judaism and its monarchy, for example, are historical fact; the records of surrounding civilizations corroborate the chronicling of their place in ...
    Related: anth, archeology, myriad, pages, testament
  • Abraham - 955 words
    Abraham The son of Terah and founder of the Hebrew Nation was a man by the name of Abraham (originally Abram). His family descended from Shem and settled in Ur of the Chaldees (Genesis 11:28), Abraham's home town. Terah was apparently an idolater (Joshua 24:2), but had three sons, Abraham, Nahor, and Haran, one of which would go on to be called by God to create a chosen people. Abraham was married to his half-sister, Sarah (originally Sarai). After the death of his brother Nahor, Abraham and his family, including his nephew Lot and father Terah, left Ur to go to the land of Canaan (Genesis 11:27-31). In Acts, Stephen says that God appeared to Abraham in Ur, before he lived in Haran, and appe ...
    Related: abraham, father abraham, chosen people, founder, believer
  • Acts And Theophilus - 5,304 words
    Acts And Theophilus 1. Theophilus Lover of God, a Christian, probably a Roman, to whom Luke dedicated both his Gospel and the Acts of the Apostles. Nothing beyond this is known of him. From the fact that Luke applies to him the title "most excellent", the same title Paul uses in addressing Felix and Festus, it has been concluded that Theophilus was a person of rank, perhaps a Roman officer (Henneke). 2. John the Baptist John was Jesus cousin. He was to prepare a way for the messiah by baptizing people into repentance. He is only mentioned in Acts in passing. He had been murdered by King Herod years before. 3. Jesus He is the suffering servant, the messiah. He is God in flesh. He is the main ...
    Related: first century, lord jesus, kingdom of god, diana, persuade
  • An Enemy Called Violence - 1,644 words
    An Enemy Called Violence An Enemy Called Violence Even though the Hebrews believe God to be loving, he is not found pleasant in all situations. God is helpful, rewarding, and caring in the Bible toward the people who have faith in him; and is also known to be devastating, and at times overwhelming to his opponents when God inflicts forces of violence. The force of violence plays a major roll in Genesis and Exodus. Three main events in Genesis/Exodus come to mind when discussing the privileges of Gods followers or the violence against Gods opponents. God regrets his creation of mankind and exercises force against the wicked and evil people by creating a flood to cover up his error. This error ...
    Related: violence, wild animals, more violent, third force, bush
  • Are Science And Religion One - 2,036 words
    Are Science And Religion One? Are Science and Religion One? Introduction I have identified the axiom of mysticism (TAM) as the scientific, religious and philosophical fact that there is only one thing that exists. Because the meaning of mysticism is commonly misunderstood this definition needs some clarification. The dictionary defines mysticism as a personal relationship with God. Given this definition it is easy to see why I have named the theory that, everything existent and non-existent is God, as the axiom of mysticism. If the theory is correct then a personal relationship with God is mandatory because God is all that can be experienced. After being confronted with TAM for the first tim ...
    Related: physical science, religion, science, general relativity, modern physics
  • Bar Mitzvah - 428 words
    Bar Mitzvah A Bar Mitzvah is about becoming a man in the eyes of G-d. That includes morally and spiritually. Thousands of years ago, when the Hebrews were crossing over the Sinai desert, the sons of Aaron, the high priest, sinned. They conducted a service drunk. They had the laws about intoxication, and knew it was wrong, but still insisted on continuing. For this they paid with their life. Thousands of years have passed on, and not much has changed. Today, in many major cities, people still commit acts that are morally wrong. There are some, though, who do not commit these acts. I aspire to be one of them, like Aaron was thousands of years ago. Today, politicians are no better, and, on many ...
    Related: mitzvah, high priest, desert, bend
  • Barnabas - 966 words
    Barnabas Barnabas was a native of the island of Cyprus. His birthplace makes him a Jew of the Diaspora, the dispersion of Jews outside Palestine or modern Israel. He was originally named Joseph but the apostles called him Barnabas, he probably acquired this name because of his ability as a preacher. The name Barnabas was understood by Luke to mean Son of Encouragement (Acts 4:36). Barnabas was an apostle of the secondary group, companion of Paul on his mission to Cyprus and the Pisidian mainland. Barnabas first appears in Luke's account of communal living in the Jerusalem church, as a man of some means who gave to the church the proceeds from the sale of a piece land, Barnabas sold a field h ...
    Related: barnabas, abingdon press, zondervan publishing house, missionary journey, galatians
  • Beginning Of A Nation - 1,118 words
    Beginning Of A Nation Page 2 THE BEGINNINGS OF A NATION Theonomy is a term for the belief that the moral law of God is to be applied as a standard of righteousness for governing individuals and society. The term comes from the Greek for God's law and is the concept that all of the moral laws (those excluding the non-ceremonial and dietary laws) given to Moses and recorded in the Pentateuch are binding on people of all nations forever. Theonomy posits God's law as the only just standard for regulations in every human institution: family, church, and state. Theocracy is the term for a nation ruled by God and God's law. Theocracy does not imply rule of the state by the church. The proper term h ...
    Related: graduate student, civil government, civil liberty, participate, constitution
  • Bible About Muhammad - 5,518 words
    ... a hundred different tests that the unprejudiced seeker after truth can apply to the Holy Quran and it will qualify with flying colors to being a Message from on High. Like Adam Does the miraculous birth of Jesus make him a God or a "begotten" son of God? No! says the Holy Quran: "The similitude of Jesus before Allah (God) is that of Adam; He created him from dust then said to him: 'Be', and he was." (3:59) Yusuf Ali, comments in his notes in the Quran translation: "After a description of the high position which Jesus occupies as a prophet in the preceding verses we have a repudiation of the dogma that he was God, or the son of God, or any thing more than man. If it is said that he was bo ...
    Related: bible, books of the bible, christian bible, holy bible, muhammad, the bible
  • Circumcision - 1,189 words
    Circumcision In the first biblical mention of circumcision, God made a covenant with Abraham and his descendants. God said to Abram, I am God Almighty; walk before me and be blameless.'' God then explained his part of the covenant --- he would be the God of Abraham's descendants and give them the land of Canaan (Genesis 17:1-8); God then further explained Abraham's part of the covenant (verses 10-14). This is...the covenant you are to keep.'' Every male was to be circumcised, and this physical rite was to be the sign of the covenant'' with God, and it was an everlasting covenant.'' Every male in Abraham's household was to be circumcised immediately, and from then on every new baby boy was to ...
    Related: circumcision, promised land, holy spirit, john the baptist, ears
  • Comparitive Philosophies And Religions - 1,983 words
    Comparitive Philosophies And Religions Life in ancient times was full of risks and uncertainty for those people living there. Much trust was put in the unknown, but as civilizations progressed, there was a feeling of need to understand the unknown and the meanings of life. Within this paper I will discuss three important issues that deal with the progress of life in relation to the civilizations of the Mesopotamians, Egyptians, Hebrews and Greeks. In ancient civilizations concepts of the afterlife were based on myth. Glamorous stories about gods and goddesses from the past were the motivation for ancient people to live their lives. In Mesopotamian culture, every day was controlled by the god ...
    Related: comparitive, greek religion, ancient civilizations, european history, codes
  • Darwin - 2,435 words
    Darwin From his theories that he claimed were developed during his voyage, Darwin eventually wrote his Origin of Species and Descent of Man, which exploded into the world market over twenty years after his return home. Wallace, King and Sanders wrote in Biosphere, The Realm of Life: In 1859, Charles Darwin published a theory of evolution that implied that humans evolved from apes. . .The Darwinian revolution was the greatest paradigm shift in the history of biology, and it greatly changed the way that ordinary men and women viewed their own place in the world. (1) World Book tells us: (2). . .The study of the specimens from the voyage of the Beagle convinced Darwin that modern species had ev ...
    Related: charles darwin, darwin, origin of species, the bible, diversity
  • Death Penalty - 1,120 words
    ... ing wrong. What principles do you think they are going to live by? What you say, or what you do? The Death Penalty goes back many, many years. It started out as hangings, shootings, and decapitations, and moved to gas chambers, and electric chairs, and the newest-lethal injections. We may have moved up the scale with the brutality to which the sentence is carried out, but even back then, it was thought to be most immoral. Tolstoy, an eyewitness of a Paris execution in the 1800's, states it well. When I saw how the head was separated from the body and as it dropped noisily into the basket, I understood, not with my reason, but with my whole being that no theories of the rationality of mod ...
    Related: death penalty, penalty, christian life, good and evil, noble
  • Death Penalty - 1,462 words
    Death Penalty Oklahoma executed Sean Sellers, who was sixteen when he murdered his parents, February 1999. This marked the first time in forty years that such a young offender was executed in the United States. Criticism and calls for clemency came from around the world, including Archbishop Desmond Tutu, the American Bar Association, and Amnesty International. These events that have occurred in our country are tearing it apart at its seams: the death penalty and the divided America it has created. Long before the first prisons were built there was the penalty of death. The Greeks and Hebrews developed a specific ritual for execution by stoning. Death by a thousand cuts was popular in China ...
    Related: death penalty, death row, penalty, nations high commissioner, early america
  • Democratic Ecohumanism, Market Civilization - 1,376 words
    Democratic Eco-Humanism, Market Civilization In an effort to dramatize his neo-Polanyian critique of neo-liberal global capitalism, Stephen Gill questions the tenability of his own term market civilization, proposing it as oxymoronic in that a market civilization qua the neo-liberal order contradicts Gill's view of civilization qua democratic eco-humanism (i.e. representation, civility, social well-being and inclusion). In this formation, Gill's argument is essentially circular in its reliance on his own subjective standard of civilization, (democratic eco-humanism), to prove the uncivilized nature of the neo-liberal order. By adopting a more objective, (and necessarily more general), defini ...
    Related: civilization, market, third world, human interaction, planet
  • Evolution - 1,034 words
    Evolution Theory This short report will give you a short summary on evolution and how it my affect us, or even surroundings. Also, how it my affect our food chain and if one thing would die how the other would suffer because of that, for an example if you had snakes and birds and if snakes were to die birds population would drop. Why, because birds feed on snakes. Now a part of the food chain contains something called "niche" now you are asking what that is, so I guess that I will answer that question, it basically what the organism will do in the food chain. A food chain is how in the worlds animals, people, parasites, and insects get all of their food ,and what predators will eat them.. Pl ...
    Related: evolution, evolution theory, theory of evolution, genetic mutation, food supply
  • God Speaks Through The Mouths Of Poets - 1,020 words
    God Speaks Through The Mouths Of Poets Every poem has an element of God in it's words. Just as God spoke through the writings of Peter or Matthew, elements of His word are in the beautiful themes in poetry. In this essay, I will compare the poems of William Blake and William Wordsworth with the written Word of God, in five poems: The Lamb, The Chimney Sweeper, The Tyger, My Heart Leaps Up, and London 1802. My aim is to show that the writings of great poets are truly the words of God. Little Lamb, who made thee? Dost thou know who made thee? These begin the words of William Blake's The Lamb. Just as God asks us, Blake questions our understanding of our creator. If we are seen as the lambs of ...
    Related: poets, little lamb, william wordsworth, burning bright, enslaved
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