Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: harold bloom

  • 33 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • A Comparison Of Coleridge's Rationalism To Wordsworth's Liberalism - 1,720 words
    A Comparison Of Coleridge'S Rationalism To Wordsworth'S Liberalism All friendships grow and nurture each other through time. The friendship between Coleridge and Wordsworth allowed for a special relationship of both criticism and admiration to develop. As their friendship matured, they would play important roles in each other's works, culminating in their joint publication of Lyrical Ballads, which is said to mark the beginning of the Romantic period and be a combination of their best works. Despite their basic differences in poetic styles and philosophical beliefs, they would help each other create numerous works renown for their depth and creativity. Coleridge was a reserved dreamer, a tru ...
    Related: comparison, liberalism, rationalism, young boy, samuel taylor coleridge
  • Absurd - 1,338 words
    ... hinoceros, as being the Nazi influence, and Berenger, the main character, as an ordinary man in an extraordinary situation. The chaos of the early to mid-twentieth century influenced Ionesco's life and work's greatly. He struggled with the concept of the absurd and soon became the father of the theatre of the absurd. He led men such as Samuel Beckett and Jean Genet to a greater understanding of the absurd. Samuel Beckett was one of the greatest names of the theater of the absurd. He spent a lifetime of hardship and work to overcome the challenges of his low self-esteem and confidence. He grew up in Dublin, Ireland, in a prominent family. After college, he was employed as James Joyce's se ...
    Related: absurd, modern world, liberation organization, middle class, autobiographical
  • Animal Farm And 1984 - 669 words
    Animal Farm And 1984 In his books, Animal Farm and 1984, George Orwell creates two similar societies attempting to achieve perfection through tyranny but the environment of each supports a different culture. In both Animal Farm and 1984 the ruling society depresses the individual in order to achieve his total obedience. In Animal Farm the environment is static that of a rigid society- that of a small space -for it is in a farm. Because it is so simple, so undeveloped technology wise, a different society immerges, a society more similar to that of today, then to that of the other book, 1984. In 1984, the government controls the individual technology wise. It uses technology in order to watch ...
    Related: 1984, animal farm, farm, orwell 1984, harold bloom
  • Billy Graham - 2,239 words
    ... des of the fifties, if it were in print, it was infallible truth. As a result, not only was communism a force from overseas to fear, it was a force within our own boundaries threatening to tear apart the post war threads that tenuously held the nation together. Billy Graham was not immune to what was going on. When he spoke about communism, he spoke as a person not completely removed from the attitudes that were prevalent in the nation. He, too feared communism. In a message delivered as early as 1947 he stated, Communism is creeping inexorably into these destitute lands, into wartorn China, into restless South America, and unless the Christian religion rescues the nation from the clutch ...
    Related: billy, graham, harry truman, south america, tongue
  • Catcher In The Rye - 1,339 words
    Catcher In The Rye Although J.D. Salinger has only one novel to his credit, that novel, The Catcher in the Rye, is recognized as an exceptional literary work. The key to the success of The Catcher in the Rye is the main character, Holden Caulfield. There are many different critics that view Holden in many different ways. Some believe Holden to be a conceited snob, while others see Holden as a Christ-like figure. It is my opinion, however, that Holden is somewhere in the middle. Holden Caulfield is a character who has a definite code of honor that he attempts to live up to and expects to as abide by as well. Since the death of his brother Allie, Holden has experienced almost a complete sense ...
    Related: catcher, catcher in the rye, the catcher in the rye, york city, main character
  • Critiscisms Of My Antonia - 1,321 words
    Critiscisms Of My Antonia In the past, critics have ad moralized and/or brutalized every writer they could get their pen on. This is seen from criticisms of Henry Adams to William Butler Yeats. These writers critique everything about the writer and his/her works. For instance many critics criticize Willa Cather's novel, My Antonia. Their criticisms lie on the basis that My Antonia is based on cyclical themes with no structure holding each of the My Antonia's books. In other words, as a collection of five different accounts remembered by the main character, Jim Burden, My Antonia is characterized by a loose plot structure yet the existence of common themes is expressed in a cyclical nature. A ...
    Related: antonia, my antonia, william butler, american literature, farm
  • Death Of Salesman And Crucible - 5,122 words
    Death Of Salesman And Crucible Arthur Miller, winner of many literary and dramatic awards, is an incredibly influential force in American drama. His plays deal with issues common to every society. He makes the audience face fault, weakness, and ignorance; subjects we would typical hide from. At the same time he emphasizes strength, human spirit, and familial love. Alice Griffin believes that Miller's plays are important internationally (xii). He belongs to an international theater rather than a regional theater (Heilman 170). His plays are staged and studied by students to understand American life in Russia, P and, Iceland, Brazil, Italy, France, Germany, Czech Republic, and China to name a ...
    Related: crucible, death of a salesman, salesman, the crucible, make sense
  • Dream Interpretation Therapy - 1,243 words
    ... atient. The therapist invites the patient to talk about his or her past, angers, fears, and fantasies. This form of talking helps the patient gain control of his life by confessing to the therapist his or her needs, motivations in life, wishes and memories. Sometimes there are difficulties in the progress of a person's ability to talk about what is bothering him or her. This difficulty of making progress is called resistance. An example of resistance is when the patient becomes unable to talk to the therapist any longer, or stops communicating feelings, or does not want to talk about certain topics. Transference is another problem that sometimes occurs through the course of the therapy. ...
    Related: dream, dream interpretation, interpretation, therapy, simon schuster
  • Edgar Allen Poe - 1,221 words
    Edgar Allen Poe 2/96 The short story writer which I have chosen to research is Edgar Allen Poe. After reading one of his works in class, I realized that his mysterious style of writing greatly appealed to me. Although many critics have different views on Poe's writing style, I think that Harold Bloom summed it up best when he said, Poe has an uncanny talent for exposing our common nightmares and hysteria lurking beneath our carefully structured lives. ( 7) For me, this is done through his use of setting and narrative style. In many of Poe's works, setting is used to paint a dark and gloomy picture in our minds. I think that this was done deliberatly by Poe so that the reader can make a conne ...
    Related: allen, edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, edgar allen
  • Emily Dickinson - 1,248 words
    Emily Dickinson Emily Dickinson is one of the most well known poets of her time. Though her life was outwardly uneventful, what went on inside her house behind closed doors is unbelievable. After her father died she met Reverend Charles Wadsworth. She soon came to regard him as one of her most trusted friends, and she created in his image the lover whom she was never to know except in her imagination. It is also said that it was around 1812 when he was removed to San Fransico that she began her withdrawal from society. During this time she began to write many of her poems. She wrote mainly in private, guarding all of her poems from all but a few select friends. She did not write for fame, bu ...
    Related: dickinson, emily, emily dickinson, harold bloom, nineteenth century
  • Frankenstein: The Creators Faults In The Creation - 1,305 words
    Frankenstein: The Creator's Faults in the Creation Often the actions of children are reflective of the attitudes of those who raised them. In the novel Frankenstein : Or the Modern Prometheus by Mary Shelly, Dr. Victor Frankenstein is the sole being that can take responsibility for the creature that he has created, as he is the only one that had any part in bringing it into being. While the actions of the creation are the ones that are the illegal and deadly their roots are traced back to the flaws of Frankenstein as a creator. Many of Frankenstein's faults are evident in the appearance of his creation. It is described as having yellow skin, dark black hair, eyes sunk into their sockets, and ...
    Related: houghton mifflin, more important, chelsea house, unexpected, partially
  • Hamlet And Father - 898 words
    Hamlet And Father There are many different reasons why Hamlet must avenge the death of his father the late King Hamlet. The aspect of justice versus revenge is a prominent theme throughout the play. Prominent characteristics in each of the characters seeking revenge shows the different aspects of what each character feels is justice. Hamlet is notoriously known for being a man of action. This characteristic hampers the chain of events that follow after his fathers slaying. There are many reasons why Hamlet wants to avenge his fathers murder, and justice and revenge play a big role in when and where his revenge on Clauduis is played out There is the revenge that he feels must be carried out t ...
    Related: hamlet, king hamlet, critical essays, the bible, scholar
  • Hamlet Feelings - 1,738 words
    Hamlet Feelings Everyone contains a tinge of Hamlet in his feelings, wants, and worries, and proudly so, for Hamlet is not like the other tragic heroes of his period. He stands apart from other Shakespeare's heroes in his today much discussed innocence. Is this supposed tragic hero maybe an ideal hero - one without the tragic flaw, which has been a part of the formula for the tragedy since the Golden age of Greece?; is a question that has been the field for many literary critics' battles. The main, and, most often, the only flaw that has been attributed to Hamlet is his delay. This seems to constitute the central part in Hamlet. Critics seem to cling to this detail, as if trying to save the ...
    Related: hamlet, king hamlet, seventeenth century, royal court, crowd
  • Hedda Gabler By Ibsen - 1,012 words
    Hedda Gabler By Ibsen Henrik Ibsens Hedda Gabler is not truly indicative of his vast body of work: the protagonist is female and the play is a character study. Oddly enough, though, Hedda does not evolve or progress throughout the entirety of the work. Rather, she remains a cold and manipulative woman. When this fact is realized, the only task is discovering why Hedda continues as a flat character who is restrained from gaining the status of a hero. Truthfully, there are many variables that shape Heddas life. Nonetheless, two factors in particular stand outher father, General Gabler, and the repressive, masculine society of the era. Although Ibsen does not directly address these issues, he s ...
    Related: gabler, hedda, hedda gabler, henrik ibsen, ibsen
  • J D Salinger - 1,182 words
    J. D. Salinger The worth of a book is to be measured by what you can carry away from it. -James Bryce* In 1945, a novel was published that would forever change the way society views itself. The book, entitled The Catcher in the Rye, would propel a man named Jerome David Salinger to fame as one of the most famous authors of the twentieth century. This same man, not ten years after the publication and while still in the peak of his career, would depart from this society- the one that he so greatly changed leaving nothing but his literature to be his lasting voice. However one may view this mysterious life of J. D. Salinger, there is but one thing for certain: J. D. Salinger has provided the re ...
    Related: j. d. salinger, salinger, early childhood, world war ii, stray
  • Kafka - 1,960 words
    Kafka And Reality Of Change The Reality of Change What is reality? Every person has his or her own"reality" or truth of their existence. For some it may be a dead-end job due to their lack of education while to others it may be the carefree life of a successful person. The true reality of any situation is that whatever direction is chosen in life a person brings the same inner self, motivational levels and attitudes. Unless they are willing to change the way they perceive and react to a situation they are forever trading one set of problems for another. As readers of literature we too seek to escape our "reality" and experience life through an authors imagination while gaining valuable knowl ...
    Related: franz kafka, kafka, the manager, work schedule, react
  • King Lear And Edmund - 1,861 words
    King Lear And Edmund In King Lear, the villainous but intelligent Edmund, with more than a brief examination into his character, has understandable motivations outside of the base purposes with which he might at first be credited. Edmund is a character worthy of study, as he seems to be the most socially complex character of the play. In a sense, he is both victim and villain. Edmund is introduced into the play in the opening scene with his father, Gloucester, stating that he acknowledges him as his son, but publicly mocking him for his bastardy. He is referred to by Gloucester as a reason for Gloucester to blush and as a"knave" in front of Kent (1.1.9-25). According to Claude J. Summers, "I ...
    Related: edmund, king lear, lear, the intended, shakespeare quarterly
  • Lord Of Flies By William Golding - 1,610 words
    Lord Of Flies By William Golding William Goldings Lord of the Flies is a sordid tale about a group of kids who are stranded on a deserted island after their plane crashes. The story is set during the Atomic War and plenty of references are made to the fact. However, the real key to the story lies in the role of Beelzebub, Lord of the Flies. Beelzebub has a central role in the story as he represents the Beast, or evil, that dwells within all humans. The Beast cannot be hunted and since it dwells within all humans, humans are all guilty because mankind is sick. The destruction of mankind is a point that Golding makes apparent often in this novel. He establishes early on that Beelzebub is a for ...
    Related: flies, golding, lord of the flies, william golding, most effective
  • Matthew Sinrod - 837 words
    Matthew Sinrod Dr. Doyle Eng 102 5/5/98 Themes in The Grapes of Wrath John Steinbeck was born in Salinas, California February 27th 1902. He was the third of four children and the only son of John Ernst Steinbeck II, manager of a flour mill, and Olive Hamilton Steinbeck, a former teacher. Steinbeck said of his youth, (We were poor people with a hell of a lot of land which made us think we were rich people, even when we couldn't buy food and were patched.) Steinbeck used the area where he grew up as the setting for many of his stories. He attended Stanford University for a few years. He had to work to pay for his education, and sometimes took off one quarter to pay for the next. (He worked as ...
    Related: matthew, human experience, works cited, penguin books, carolyn
  • Mrs Brew 13 May 1996 Intelligent Design Of The Universe The Search For Knowledge About The Origin Of Humanity Is As Old As It - 1,061 words
    ... reation of the universe not an accident, but "the existence of human life is something for which the entire universe appears to have been intricately fine-tuned from the start"(28). This principle is based on universal constants such as Planck's constant and the gravitational constant. It started out as a list of coincidences, but as the list grew the more it appeared as if the universe had been designed for humanity to exist(29). The second law of thermodynamics has been extensively studied by scientists and people as another proof of creation. The second law of thermodynamics can be stated: "The thermodynamic principle which governs the behavior of systems is that, as they are moved aw ...
    Related: brew, humanity, intelligent, intelligent design, origin, universe
  • 33 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2