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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: hallucinations

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  • Mcbeth: Impact Of Hallucinations - 306 words
    Mcbeth: Impact Of Hallucinations # #Penapc Thursday, October 12, 2000 Shakespears The Tragedy of McBeth: Impact of Hallucinations I believe that the hallucinations viewed by McBeth played an important part in the whole story. It was one of those important factors that determined the outcome. McBeth as a leader should show only strength and no signs of weakness is acceptable. McBeths judgment begins to deteriorate once he sees these hallucinations. When McBeth sees a dagger floating and hovering above his head he is viewed by the rest of the characters in the room as a lunatic. This is not a feature a great leader is distinguished by. McBeth is characterized as a tragic hero and a tragic hero ...
    Related: hallucinations, walk away, tragic hero, floating, murderer
  • A Comparison Of Macbeth And Crime And Punishment - 1,336 words
    A Comparison of Macbeth and Crime and Punishment Shakespeares Macbeth and Dostoevskys Crime and Punishment explore the psychological depths of man. These two works examine tragedy as represented through the existential beliefs of many philosophers. Existentialist theory expresses the idea that man can satisfy his own needs, regardless of social codes, if he has the energy and ambition to act. Both Macbeth and Raskolnikov have the ambition to act, but each struggles internally with their actions, frightened of the consequences. Although these works examine the tragedy and remorse of Macbeth and Raskolnikov, the idea of a driving force within each character remains evident. Ultimately, William ...
    Related: comparison, crime, crime and punishment, macbeth, punishment
  • Alcohol - 517 words
    Alcohol There are some 14 million people in the United States and 1 out of every 13 adults are considered alcoholics or at least experience drinking problems to some degree. Most people just dont understand the consequences of drinking. Alcoholism is a disease and unless something is done, more and more will be affected by this dangerous drug. A bad withdraw from this drug can lead to death, not even heroin results in death as many times as alcohol. The majority of people see alcohol as a social outlet and does not consider it to be as dangerous as it may really be. Alcoholism is an often-progressive disease with symptoms that include a strong need to drink despite negative consequences, suc ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol abuse, heart disease, social issues, nervous
  • Alcohol Abuse - 1,350 words
    Alcohol Abuse Alcohol is liquid distilled product of fermented fruits, grains and vegetables used as solvent, antiseptic and sedative moderate potential for abuse. Possible effects are intoxication, sensory alteration, and/or anxiety reduction. Symptoms of overdose staggering, odor of alcohol on breath, loss of coordination, slurred speech, dilated pupils, fetal alcohol syndrome (in babies), and/or nerve and liver damage. Withdrawal Syndrome is first sweating, tremors, then altered perception, followed by psychosis, fear, and finally auditory hallucinations. Indications of possible mis-use are confusion, disorientation, loss of motor nerve control, convulsions, shock, shallow respiration, in ...
    Related: abuse, alcohol, alcohol abuse, alcohol consumption, alcohol dependence, alcohol syndrome, blood alcohol
  • Alcohol Abuse - 1,364 words
    ... get a BAC that high? A 160 pound man will have a BAC of about .04, 1 hour after consuming two 12-ounce beers on an empty stomach. Your BAC will depend on how much you weigh, how much you drink, amount of time since your last drink and your gender. Women metabolize alcohol differently from men, causing women to reach higher BAC's at the same doses. Recent research is showing that true substance dependence may be caused, in part, by brain chemistry deficiences. That is one reason that substance dependence is considered a disease. And, as with other diseases, there is the possibility of taking medicine to get better. There is now promising evidence that taking medicine can correct some of ...
    Related: abuse, alcohol, alcohol abuse, alcohol and drugs, alcohol syndrome, blood alcohol, drink alcohol
  • Alcoholism - 1,188 words
    Alcoholism I am sitting at home playing Nintendo with my roommate, jake, when I hear a knock at the door. I wonder who in the world would be coming over this late at night, because it's after midnight. As I open the door, the tired, bloodshot eyes of my upstairs neighbor, Steve, stare at me. "Hi Sam," Steve says. As he attempts to enter my apartment, he stumbles on the slight rise where the weather strip runs under the door. As he trips, his forehead smashes onto the edge of the coffee table leaving a deep and bloody gash. I run in the bathroom and grab a towel while Jake tries to help Steve. It doesn't take us long to realize that Steve is going to need stitches and is in no condition to dr ...
    Related: alcoholism, alcohol addiction, national academy, public health, concentration
  • Alcoholism - 1,537 words
    Alcoholism Alcoholism, Alcohol is liquid distilled product of fermented fruits, grains and vegetables used as solvent, antiseptic and sedative for potential abuse. Possible effects are intoxication, sensory alteration, and anxiety reduction. Symptoms of overdose staggering, odor of alcohol on breath, loss of coordination, slurred speech, dilated pupils, fetal alcohol syndrome in babies, and nerve and liver damage. Withdrawal Syndrome is first sweating, tremors then altered perception, followed by psychosis, fear, and finally auditory hallucinations. Indications of possible miss-use are confusion, disorientation, and loss of motor nerve control, convulsions, shock, shallow respiration, involu ...
    Related: alcoholism, school counselor, alcohol and drugs, physical system, solve
  • Alcoholism And Sleep - 1,609 words
    Alcoholism And Sleep The Effects of Alcohol on Sleep Many people usually associate alcohol with sleep and sleepiness. However, the effects of alcohol on sleep are mostly negative ones, and these two things should not be interrelated at all. In order to understand how these two things are related, one must explore the depths of two different topics: alcohol and sleep. With this knowledge, one can begin to understand how alcohol and sleep are related and what effects alcohol has on sleep. Sleep is a very active process, just like consciousness. Sleep is controlled largely by nerve centers in the lower brain stem, where the base of the brain joins the spinal cord. It is here where certain nerve ...
    Related: alcoholism, sleep apnea, sleep deprivation, sleep patterns, older persons
  • Alcoholism Is A Wideranging And Complex Disease That Heavily Plagues Society Drinking Is Defined As The Consumption Of A Liqu - 1,066 words
    Alcoholism is a wide-ranging and complex disease that heavily plagues society. Drinking is defined as the consumption of a liquid, and/or the act of drinking alcoholic beverages especially to excess. Every year alcohol is responsible for 1/2 of all murders, accidental deaths, and suicides; 1/3 of all drowning, boating, and aviation deaths; 1/2 of all crimes; and almost 1/2 of all fatal automobile accidents (Overview 1). Alcohol is a potent nonprescription drug sold to anyone over the national legal drinking age, 21. Unlike carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, which can be manufactured by the body, alcohol is a substance that is not made within the body. It is a food, because it supplies a conc ...
    Related: alcoholism, binge drinking, consumption, drinking, drinking age, drinking coffee, heavily
  • Alcoholosm - 1,240 words
    Alcoholosm Within the context of our society, drinking of alcohol is a perfectly normal activity. For most people drinking a moderate amount of alcohol can be beneficial, indeed studies suggest that moderate drinking may protect against coronary heart disease by improving insulin resistance (Gold, 1991). However, for a minority of people drinking alcohol is an activity that is fraught with danger and, for a very few, is akin to taking a poison that will almost inevitably ruin their lives. Henceforth, it is important for research purposes to define who an alcoholic is and what the effects of alcohol on that person are. An alcoholic is a person who drinks excessive amounts of alcohol habituall ...
    Related: personality type, severe mental, contributing factor, personality, drinking
  • Alzheimers - 1,205 words
    Alzheimers Disease Alzheimers Disease is a progressive, degenerative disease that attacks the brain and results in impaired memory, thinking and behavior (Internet). It is a degenerative disease affecting nerve cells of the frontal and temporal lobes of the cerebrum of the brain. The disease is the major cause of presenile dementia (i.e., the loss of mental faculties not associated with advanced age) and is thought to be the largest single cause of senile dementia as well (Britannica, 306). It causes the connections between cells to become ineffective and the cells themselves to shutdown and eventually die (Davies, 1). Alzheimers is a progressive, irreversible, fatal neurologic disorder that ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimers disease, warning signs, mental illness, paranoia
  • Amphetaminesmethamphetamines - 772 words
    Amphetamines/Methamphetamines Matchmaker.com: Sign up now for a free trial. Date Smarter! Amphetamines/Methamphetamines The medical use of amphetamines was common in the 1950/60's when they were used to help cure depression and to help the user lose weight. An amphetamine is a drug that is a stimulant to the central nervous system. Amphetamines are colorless and may be inhaled, injected, or swallowed. Amphetamines are also used non-medically to avoid sleep, improve athletic performance, or to counter the effects of depressant drugs. Amphetamines are addictive. Because of this, when the user discontinues use or reduces the amount that they use, withdrawal symptoms may occur. Some withdrawal s ...
    Related: long term effects, south korea, physical activity, addictive, smoke
  • Andrew Ott - 941 words
    Andrew Ott Macbeth Imagery Paper May 22, 2000 Blood Imagery in William Shakespeares Macbeth William Shakespeare wrote the Tragedy of Macbeth in approximately 1606 AD. He loosely based it on a historical event occurring around 1050 AD. Macbeth is the story of a nobleman, who, while trying to fulfill a prophecy told to him by three witches, murders his King to cause his ascension to the throne of Scotland. After the Kings murder, Macbeth reigns as a cruel and ruthless tyrant, who is forced to kill more people to keep control of the throne. Finally, Scottish rebels combined with English forces attack Macbeths castle, and Macbeth is killed by a Scottish Thane named Macduff who has sacrificed eve ...
    Related: andrew, william shakespeare, lady macbeth, army, macbeth
  • Anesthetics - 915 words
    Anesthetics Introduction Anesthetics are depressant drugs that cause a total or partial loss of the sense of pain. The effect an anesthetic has on the body depends on several factors. What type of anesthetic is used determines the effect along with the dosage and a person (or animal's) body weight. The word anesthesia was first introduced by Oliver Wendell Holmes in 1846 about four weeks after the first demonstration of ether anesthesia at the Massachusetts General Hospital. Ether was the first type of anesthesia used and was demonstrated as a means of allowing a patient to be unconscious and free from surgical pain. Stages of Anesthesia Stage one is known as analgesia and results from an in ...
    Related: general hospital, nuclear weapons, cardiac arrest, neural, tone
  • Are Humans Rational - 1,337 words
    Are Humans Rational? Are humans rational? The human species has well developed cognitive abilities compared to animals. These can be remarkable like language and many other communication systems. Our visual system provides us with excellent vital information for the environment. Besides, through thinking and problem solving, we have adapted the environment to suit us and developed science and technology. Surely, these are evidence of an advanced intelligence humans possess. On the other hand, though, psychological research strongly suggests that humans are irrational. There is a mass of psychological evidence (Kahneman et al., 1982; Baron, 1988; Evans et al., 1993), which show many errors an ...
    Related: human intelligence, rational, problem solving, decision making, baron
  • Arthur Dimmesdale - 1,093 words
    Arthur Dimmesdale Dimmesdale In Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale unquestionably suffers more than Hester Prynne, his accomplice in the affair that took place years ago. He is tortured by Roger Chillingworth, Hester's husband, who arrives in Boston and begins to 'assist' Dimmesdale with his illness. He is also tormented by Pearl, Hester and Dimmesdale's daughter, who, is a product of the affair. He also injures himself, as the shame of the incident literally makes him sick. These persons, including himself, contribute to Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale's potential downfall. Roger Chillingworth arrives in Boston, and ironically, the first scene he views is his wi ...
    Related: arthur, arthur dimmesdale, arthur miller, dimmesdale, reverend arthur dimmesdale
  • Automobile Emissions - 1,899 words
    Automobile Emissions Pollution from automobile emissions has become over the past few decades an issue of great concern. With a growing number of motor vehicles on our roads great concern has been attributed to the effects of these emissions to our health and to the environment. Several of the gases emitted, which when present in certain concentrations in our atmosphere can be toxic, therefor these ultimate concentrations must never be achieved. Strict legislation as well as sophisticated control technology has been implemented in the automotive industry in order to limit the pollution caused. These aspects of automotive pollution shall be further discussed in this paper. KEYWORDS: Pollution ...
    Related: automobile, emission control, term effects, health effects, hemoglobin
  • Bermuda Triangle - 2,053 words
    ... s Taylor on Flight 19 when he was asked by the radio tower as to his position. His reply was We are not sure... We seem to be lost.., then a few minutes later We cannot be sure which way is west... everything is wrong... strange... we cannot be sure of any direction. Or could this simply be a disorientation in a man's own mind? Hard to say. Boom This is a theory proposed by the US Navy. The investigation centers on the possibility of electro-magnetic gravitational and atmospheric disturbances that might be possible for disintegrating craft. The Lost Patrol reported seeing a large ball of fire in the skies. Could 5 planes collide and then joined by a sixth? The investigation believes that ...
    Related: bermuda, bermuda triangle, triangle, gulf stream, atlantic ocean
  • Bipolar Disorder In Kids - 1,604 words
    Bipolar Disorder In Kids Determining Bipolar Disorder in children is harder then adults because of the mistakes doctor's make in their diagnosis. All kids have mood swings - is it Bipolar Disorder? Psychologists of today are having problems diagnosing children with Bipolar Disorder because the symptoms are so different from the adult form of the disorder. In children Bipolar Disorder is called "Child Onset Bipolar Disorder", known as COBPD (My Child 1). In children the cycling from highs to lows are very fast. Children will cycle between mania and depression many times a day. The episodes of mania or depression are short and rarely go on for more then a day at a time (Childhood 1). Children ...
    Related: affective disorder, anxiety disorder, attachment disorder, attention deficit disorder, bipolar, bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder
  • Bipolar Disorder In Kids - 1,656 words
    ... is very dangerous when a person is in a manic state, not only for themselves, but also for others around them. They are very unpredictable people. Bipolar people abuse drugs, such as alcohol, cocaine, and sleeping medications. They also often deny that they are manic because they think that everything is okay with them because they feel so good about themselves (Bipolar Disorder 2). The other side of being Bipolar is the lows that a person has to go through, the depressed part of the disorder. When a Bipolar adult is in the depression stage they can Determining Bipolar Disorder in children is harder then adults because of the mistakes doctor's make in their diagnosis. have any or all th ...
    Related: affective disorder, bipolar, bipolar disorder, disorder, mood disorder, personality disorder
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