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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: greenwich village

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  • Catcher In The Rye - 1,374 words
    Catcher In The Rye The Catcher in the Rye is about a man named Holden Caulfield, who is narrating the story. Holden is in a psychiatric hospital in California, where at the given moment he was spending his time. He then had a flashback of when he was a young man at the age of sixteen. The story starts off at Pencey Prep, Holden's present school at which he was flunking out of. Holden had only a few more days before his expulsion from Pencey, so he had been paying his final dues to his admired instructors, such as Mr. Spencer, Holdens elderly History teacher. After spending some bothersome hours with Mr. Spencer, Holden returned to his room in Ossenburger Memorial Hall. There he was visited b ...
    Related: catcher, catcher in the rye, the catcher in the rye, saturday night, spend time
  • Cole Porter - 1,249 words
    ... her life. They were married on December 19, 1919 to live a happy but mostly successful although sexless marriage until Linda's death in 1954 The Later Years After early success with one-offs like Don't Fence Me In, re- released in a World War II musical called Hollywood Canteen, Cole signed some contracts to do work for the film industry. The first film to contain a Cole Porter song was The Battle of Paris from 1929, but his two tunes from that movie had little impact on his career because of the low quality of the film in general. Cole was happy with many aspects of the Hollywood community, including the liberal gay enclave called movie industry population. Although there is some disput ...
    Related: cole, cole porter, porter, great white, movie industry
  • Cole Porter - 1,249 words
    ... her life. They were married on December 19, 1919 to live a happy but mostly successful although sexless marriage until Linda's death in 1954 The Later Years After early success with one-offs like Don't Fence Me In, re- released in a World War II musical called Hollywood Canteen, Cole signed some contracts to do work for the film industry. The first film to contain a Cole Porter song was The Battle of Paris from 1929, but his two tunes from that movie had little impact on his career because of the low quality of the film in general. Cole was happy with many aspects of the Hollywood community, including the liberal gay enclave called movie industry population. Although there is some disput ...
    Related: cole, cole porter, porter, indiana jones, great white
  • Coming Out Of Gay Men And Lesbians - 1,147 words
    Coming Out Of Gay Men And Lesbians "Coming Out" of Gay Men and Lesbians "Coming out" is a means of identifying one's sexual orientation as gay, lesbian, or bisexual. At its most basic, "coming out of the closet," means being honest with those around you - friends, family, colleagues, and so forth - about your sexual orientation, about whom you are. It also means acknowledging one's sexual orientation to self. Such disclosure is an ongoing, lifelong process rather than a one-time event. New personal, social, and professional situations require gay men and lesbians to make decisions about the degree to which they can be open about their sexual orientation (Morrow, 1996). Sexual orientation is ...
    Related: mental health, identity development, psychological adjustment, abuse, turbulent
  • Discrimination - 1,339 words
    Discrimination Alternative Discrimination In todays American society, it is expected that young men and young women court eachother, marry, and eventually raise a family. This is the kind of life that is expected, the one almost every parent wants for his or her child. Not all men however are attracted to women and not all women are attracted to men. So what is thought of the young men and women who do not fit in to this predestined lifestyle? Although homosexuality has become more mainstream, it is still looked at as an unnatural, unclean, alternative lifestyle by most. Homosexuals, as well as those who accept them, are often labeled freaks. My acceptance of homosexuality puts me in a posit ...
    Related: discrimination, greenwich village, alternative lifestyle, young women, stereotype
  • Dorthy Day - 1,715 words
    Dorthy Day Dorothy Day It seems that to some people that they give more so society than others, but than there is one woman, who gave her life to society to help others though giving and sharing and helped people through a time of need. Yet there seems to be few there is. Dorothy Day, patron of the Catholic Worker movement, was born in Brooklyn, on New York, November 8, 1897. After surviving the San Francisco earthquake in 1906, the Day family moved into a tenement flat in Chicago's South Side. It was a big step down in the world made necessary because Dorothys father was out of work. Day's understanding of the shame people feel when they fail in their efforts dated from this time. It was in ...
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  • Dylan And The Sad Eyed Lady Of The Lowland - 1,290 words
    Dylan and the Sad Eyed Lady of the Lowland Regarding significant musical movements in history, more specifically the twenty first century, few were more important than the folk revolution that took shape in the mid-nineteen hundreds. One of the leaders of this revolution was Robert Allen Zimmerman, known by his popular assumed name, Bob Dylan. Born in 1941 in Minnesota, Dylan grew up the grandchild of Jewish-Russian immigrants and had a surprisingly unexceptional childhood. His interest in music became evident in his high school years when he taught himself basic piano and guitar. From these rudimentary skills Dylan would build his knowledge and experience in music to his present status as a ...
    Related: bob dylan, dylan, high school, tennessee williams, contemporary
  • Eugene Oneil - 1,265 words
    Eugene O'neil Eugene O'neill Through poverty and fame, "An artist or nothing"(Miller p6), was the motto of a man named Eugene O'Neill, who wrote from his soul in an attempt to find salvation. In the year 1888, the Barrett House hotel in Time Square, New York saw the birth of a man who would be called the greatest American playwright. His father James, was an actor, and was famous across the United Sates for his role in the popular play Monte Cristo. Eugene's mother was a beautiful woman named Ellen who was also gifted with a great artistic talent. Through out his life, he would travel all over the world, marry three women, have three children, and write some of the best American Drama that w ...
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  • Eugene Oneil - 1,262 words
    Eugene O'Neil Through poverty and fame, "An artist or nothing" (Miller p6), was the motto of a man named Eugene ONeill, who wrote from his soul in an attempt to find salvation. In the year 1888, the Barrett House hotel in Time Square, New York saw the birth of a man who would be called the greatest American playwright. His father James, was an actor, and was famous across the United Sates for his role in the popular play Monte Cristo. Eugenes mother was a beautiful woman named Ellen who was also gifted with a great artistic talent. Through out his life, he would travel all over the world, marry three women, have three children, and write some of the best American Drama that would ever be wri ...
    Related: eugene, early life, social life, south africa, campus
  • Eugene Oneil - 1,196 words
    ... when it was staged by the Provincetown players it was an instant success. He stayed in Provincetown for a while and wrote several other short plays. Moved back to the village and got involved with Louise Bryant. He lived in a love triangle with her and her husband until 1918. When "Bound East for Cardiff was finally performed in the village, Stephen Rathburn of the New York Evening Sun praised ONeil for his work. During W.W.I he was arrested in Provincetown for vagrancy and suspicion of espionage. He was released immediately but he was continuously tailed for several weeks due to suspicion. Eugene next failure was his attempt to join the navy, he was turned down because of his earlier ba ...
    Related: eugene, nobel prize, emperor jones, school education, confession
  • Homosexual Marriage And The Catholic Church - 1,348 words
    ... n, intolerant of ambiguity, status conscious, and cognitively rigid; more dogmatic; more sexually rigid and more guilty about their own sexual impulses" (Kirk 120-129). It seems that individuals who are afraid or intolerant of homosexuals seem to react the same way to other social situations as well. The personality characteristics of homophobic people can easily be identified in others that belong to another group of prejudiced people. From the personal perspective, homosexual prejudice can be a form of anxiety regarding one's own sexual feelings. Ignorance often spurs such feelings as fear and anxiety, and this also can be attributed to these prejudices. There seem to be points in hist ...
    Related: catholic, catholic church, homosexual, homosexual marriage, district of columbia
  • Howl And Kaddish By Allen Ginsberg - 1,256 words
    Howl And Kaddish By Allen Ginsberg As you read the first lines of "Howl" and "Kaddish", the overall tone of the poem hits you right in the face. Allen Ginsberg, the poet, presents these two poems as complaints and injustices. He justifies these complaints in the pages that follow. Ginsberg also uses several literary techniques in these works to enhance the images for the reader. His own life experiences are mentioned in the poems, the majority of his works being somewhat biographical. It is said that Allen Ginsberg was ahead of his time, but in fact he was just riding the wave of a literature revolution. The decade of the 1950s was a time of change. America and the world was experiencing a t ...
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  • Jimi Hendrix - 965 words
    Jimi Hendrix Jimi Hendrix perhaps no other rock-and-roll trailblazer was as original or as influential in such a short span of time as Jimi Hendrix. Widely acknowledged as one of the most daring and inventive virtuosos in rock history, Hendrix pioneered the electric guitar (he played a right-handed Fender Stratocaster-- his "Electric Lady"--upside-down and left-handed) as an electronic sound source capable of feedback, distortion, and a host of other effects that could be crafted into an articulate and fluid emotional vocabulary. And though he was on the scene as a solo artist for less than five years, Hendrix is credited for having a profound effect on everyone from George Clinton and Miles ...
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  • None Provided - 1,140 words
    None provided JIMI HENDRIX Jimi Hendrix was one of the most influential musicians in music history. Jimi Hendrix was one of the most exciting and creative guitar players ever. He mixed Blues and Rock & Roll together to create some of the most unique music ever played. Jimi had only four years of fame, but unlike others, has become even bigger in the 20 years after his death. Jimis parents, Al Hendrix and Lucille Jeter got married in Seattle, Washington on March 31, 1942. Soon after Johnny (Jimi) Allen Hendrix was born in Seattle on November 27, 1942. Al and Lucille got divorced in December, 1951, because of Als drinking problems. Al was granted custody of Jimi and his two brothers, Leon and ...
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  • Phish - 1,252 words
    Phish Phish Friends since high school, the members of Phish have rocked the world and its millions of fans since 1991. Many who are not familiar with Phishs music may hear the songs and consider them similar to the Greatful Dead, after all, they do have many things in common. After reading this paper, hopefully the reader will figure out for themselves the distinction, and experience a new insight into world of music featuring Phish. Trey Anatasio, the lead singer of Phish, had been writing music since high school. A native of New Jersey, Trey failed elementary music class not because he was a bad musician, but because he had poor behavior. That did not hold him back though. Trey completed h ...
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  • Rebel Of The Underground - 1,381 words
    "REBEL OF THE UNDERGROUND" The Life and Works of Tupac Amaru Shakur Both Tupac and Amaru are words of Inca origin. Together they mean, shining serpent. Shakur means thankful to God, from the Arabic language. Tupac, commonly known as America's most controversial rapper was labeled a gangster rapper and one of the largest figures in the rap community. He was always known for doing what he wanted and not caring what others thought of him. His life symbolized what a lot of people have gone through. Through his music and movies he showed how hard life can be. On June 16, 1971 Tupac was born to Alice Faye Williams in Brooklyn, NY. His mother was a revolutionary as she called herself Afeni Shakur. ...
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  • Rebel Poets Of 1950s - 1,826 words
    Rebel Poets Of 1950S Rebel Poets of the 1950s America demands a poetry that is bold, modern and all-surrounding and kosmical, as she is herself. Although Walt Whitman wrote that prescription shortly after the Civil War, it also vividly describes the generation of American poets who came of age after World War II. Particularly during moments of cultural change, poets have joined artists on the front lines of expanding consciousness by forging a vernacular language that gives expression to contemporary life. One such shift in poetry occurred at the time of World War I, and another major shift took place during the decade after the Second World War. The 1950s are stereotypically represented as ...
    Related: american poets, poets, rebel, urban life, natural environment
  • The Harlem Renaissance - 1,150 words
    The Harlem Renaissance Or the New Negro Movement The dawn of the 1920s ushered in an African American artistic and cultural movement, the likes of which have never and will likely never be seen again. Beginning as a series of literary discussions in Greenwich Village and Harlem, the "New Negro Movement" (later dubbed the Harlem Renaissance by Alain Locke) came to exalt the unique culture of African Americans and redefine African American expression. The movement spread throughout all areas of the arts and humanities, gaining a wider audience as it went along. Soon it became more than just an artistic movement, it was at the same time a social ideal. The authors and artists of the era simulta ...
    Related: harlem, harlem renaissance, renaissance, american identity, neale hurston
  • The Incomparable Blossom Dearie - 1,364 words
    The Incomparable Blossom Dearie Hearing Blossom Dearie sing is a surreal experience. She is a vocalist who has a uniqueness, charm, and range unlike any other. A natural cabaret singer best suited to comedic songs and other"light"repertoire, Blossom can just as quickly turn around and draw you into the most aching, beautiful love song possible. She is the girl you fall in love with because her lyrics leave you with the impression that she too is in love, and you can not help but smile. A singer, pianist and songwriter, with a 'wispy, little-girlish' voice, Dearie is regarded as one of the great supper club singers (Line) Her father was of Scottish and Irish descent; her mother emigrated from ...
    Related: benny goodman, music career, carnegie hall, carson, greenwich
  • Through Out History The World Has Seen Some Generations That Have - 1,890 words
    Through out history the world has seen some generations that have made an impact more than all of its predecessors. The decade from 1960 to 1970 was definitely one of those eras. The people didn't follow the teachings of its elders, but rejected them for an alternative culture which was their very own(Harris 14). Made up of the younger population of the time this new culture was such a radical society that they were given their own name which is still used today. They came to be called the Hippies. The Hippie movement started in San Francisco, California and spread across the United States, through Canada, and into parts of Europe (World Book). But it had its greatest influence in America. D ...
    Related: history, world book, middle class, rights movement, movies
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