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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: ancient rome

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  • Ancient Rome - 1,988 words
    Ancient Rome Roman games were much like Greek games, but there was more physical contact sports such as Gladiator combats, man against beast, and water battles. Chariot races were the same as the Greek chariot races. Rome had many different types of chariots. Biage were chariots pulled by two horses, and quadrigae chariots were pulled by four horses. Each race had 12 chariots going on one track at once. The racers would take 7 laps around the arena which would be a total of 5 miles long. Teams of four chariots would be either red, blue, green, or red in the chariot racing. Gladiators combat was where two men fought until one was dead. The gladiators would be armed with a weapon to make the b ...
    Related: ancient china, ancient civilizations, ancient egypt, ancient greece, ancient rome, greece and rome, rome
  • Armor Of Ancient Rome - 1,947 words
    Armor Of Ancient Rome Armor of Ancient Rome Ancient Rome expended a great deal of economic resources and effort upon conquest and expansion through military means. The role of armor was fundamental in this expansion as it played a significant role in the success of the Roman armies on the battlefield. There were three common requirements for armor construction throughout its history: The first was that armor had to be flexible enough to allow the wearer freedom of movement; second, it also had to be lightweight enough to be worn without tiring the wearer while providing protection against opponents' weapons; and third, armor had to be cost effective. These three aspects influenced the evolut ...
    Related: ancient rome, armor, rome, military force, praetorian guard
  • Armor Of Ancient Rome - 1,908 words
    ... and relieving the shoulders of part of their burden. Moreover, tests using contemporary arrow types by Massey suggests that most arrowhead types consistently penetrated the mail to a depth that would prove lethal to the wearer. However, bunching of the mail at suspension points prevented penetration of the mail beyond a depth of 3-5 cm. This [implies] that the doubling of mail shoulder defenses known to be practiced by both Romans and Celts may have saved the life of their owners." These observations are consistent with Plutarch's writings of the life of Marcus Licinius Crassus who in 53 B.C. engaged the Parthians with his army in the deserts of Mesopotamia at the Battle of Carrhae. Plut ...
    Related: ancient rome, armor, imperial rome, rome, roman army
  • Christianity In Ancient Rome - 979 words
    Christianity in Ancient Rome The way the Romans viewed Christianity is slightly different from the general theory. The Romans did not spend all their time hunting down Christians in order to crucify them or throw them to the lions. When Christianity first started in the Roman Empire, it was viewed as another sect of Judaism. There was no differentiating between the Jews and the Christians in the eyes of the Roman government. The Christians were seen simply as a more radical group of Jews. They were also not completely trusted because of their monotheistic belief and non-acceptance of the Roman gods. Not much was even known about them by the Romans because of their mostly secretive ways. This ...
    Related: ancient rome, christianity, rome, roman empire, general theory
  • Are Humans Animals, Or Are They Something More - 1,176 words
    Are Humans Animals, Or Are They Something More? Human beings should be more than animals, but are they really? In Republic, by Plato, Antigone, by Sophocles, The Aeneid of Virgil, by Virgil, and On Justice Power and Human Nature, by Thucydides, it seems as though human beings really are nothing more than animals. Animals are thought of as not caring about anyone but himself or herself. It is survival of the fittest, if you are not strong enough, someone else will take your place. Human should be caring for other human beings, if someone is in trouble, another human should help them. This is not the way it is in these 3 works. Humans dont care about anyone but themselves, they kill so they ca ...
    Related: human beings, human nature, civil war, make money, plato
  • Baroque Art - 637 words
    Baroque Art During the Baroque period, new ideas and views of society and of religion spurred up. To express these new ideas many artists used the ideas of past artists to further expand their own motives. " If I have seen further (than you and Descartes), it is by standing upon the shoulders of Giants." Sir Isaac Newton, 1676 The artists of the baroque period were using past ideals as a ladder to the prevalent and the gallant. Four pieces of art that exceplified the usage of the great minds of the past were; The Rape of the Sabine Women by Nicholas Poussin, The east faade of the Louvre Palace, The View of Delft by Jan Vermeer and The Palace of Versailles. The magnificent artwork of Nicholas ...
    Related: baroque, baroque art, baroque period, king louis xiv, finance minister
  • Caligula - 1,134 words
    Caligula As most of the emperors of ancient Rome were given different names then the names they had at birth Caligula was no different. Caligula's real name was Gaius Caesar Augustus Germanicus and he was born at Antium, 25 miles from Rome, in 12 AD Gaius was a turning point in the history of the Principate, but he also was the one emperor from the Julio-Claudian dynasty who was very poorly documented. ( Bibliography # 2). Gaius was born on August 31, 12 AD to Germanicus; Augustus' adopted grandson, and Agrippina Senior, Augustus' granddaughter. Gaius was the third of six children, the youngest son, and accompanied his parents on many military campaigns. As a baby his parents would dress him ...
    Related: caligula, ancient rome, praetorian guard, turning point, suspicious
  • Capital Punishment - 1,225 words
    Capital Punishment Since the beginning of recorded history, mankind has made use of the idea of capital punishment. Most ancient societies accepted the notion that certain crimes deserved the death penalty. The idea of a crime punishable by death dates far back to Ancient Rome and the laws passed at that time. Till this day, however, there is still much debate as to whether or not capital punishment should be abolished. Although there are numerous arguments for and against the situation, the only way to fully understand something is to look at the death penalty from both standing viewpoints. When discussing Capital Punishment, many questions are asked. Is it morally just? Is it an effective ...
    Related: capital punishment, penalty capital punishment, punishment, death penalty, crime rate
  • Domestication Of The Dog - 1,036 words
    Domestication Of The Dog Todays dogs serve as a number of different tools. We train dogs to see for the blind, we train them to sniff for drugs, we train them to save peoples lives, and we train them to be our faithful companions. There is no doubt that the dog has a wide variety of skills and jobs. We selectively breed the dog to gain the certain attributes we are seeking, and we know which dogs will perform the best at what we want them to do. The question is how long ago, and why did the dog become our aids, tools, and companions? Answering this question means dealing with the four fields of Anthropology: Ethnologically, Archaeologically, Physically, and Linguistically. The most obvious w ...
    Related: domestication, bronze age, physical anthropology, over time, multiple
  • Dreams - 1,077 words
    ... image, no matter how embarrassing, foolish, or bizarre the answer is. Then Freud would consider the relationship between the responses and come up with a logical wish that the dreamer wants fulfilled. Freuds theory that all dreams are wish fulfillments was challenged because it did not explain the occurrence of nightmares. In response Freud said that nightmares do represent wishes as well and the fear is a result of the censoring agency failing to mask the wishes good enough. Freuds second explanation for nightmares was that some people have a masochistic component in [their] sexual constitution, (Bulkeley, 18) a sense pleasure from being hurt. For such people a nightmare might be a fulf ...
    Related: dreams, meaning of dreams, ancient rome, therapeutic relationship, theater
  • Evil Emperors - 1,625 words
    Evil Emperors Andew Bove Block F Augustus was one of the single most extraordinary emperors to ever rule the Roman Empire, he was also the first. Augustus set a precept for emperors to come. Some emperors followed it, some tried, and some didnt try at all. My report is about two emperors of Rome that didnt rule in light of Augustus, and probably couldnt help it, considering they were most definitely insane. Caligula Gaius Caesar was born in the ancient city of Antium on August 31, 12 A.D.. Gaius had two brothers and three sisters. Gaius was devoted to his sisters, and according to popular scandal, to the point of incest. Gaiuss father was Germanicus, nephew and adopted son of Tiberus, the se ...
    Related: emperor tiberius, roman emperor, dysfunctional family, roman history, burn
  • Fall Of The Roman Empire - 1,023 words
    Fall Of The Roman Empire The Roman Empire lasted for over a thousand years; from 756BC to 476AD. But from 180 to 476 Rome decreased. There are many, many reasons that it decreased. At one point it was said that Rome was more respected than feared. That was said only 42 years before Rome began to decrease .How did this world domination go from being the most powerful empire in the world to completely nonexistent? That is what Ill be answering in this essay. The last emperor before the decline of Rome began was Marcus Aurelius. He was the third best emperor in Romes history. He was kind, benevolent, and humane. But during his reign the Pax Romana ended. The Pax Romana is the 200-year period of ...
    Related: empire, roman, roman empire, prisoners of war, good intentions
  • Forensic Psychology - 528 words
    Forensic Psychology Part I: The Job Forensic Psychology is the application of the science and profession of psychology to questions and issues relating to law and the legal system. The word forensic comes from the Latin word forensis, meaning of the forum, where the law courts of ancient Rome were held. Today forensic refers to the application of scientific principles and practices to the adversary process where specially knowledgeable scientists play a role. There are several types of Forensic Psychologists although most fall into three different categories, criminal investigation, courtroom experts, and/or correctional psychiatrists. I decided to focus on the criminal aspect since it inter ...
    Related: abnormal psychology, child psychology, developmental psychology, forensic, psychology, social psychology
  • Forensic Science: Proper Crime Scene Techniques - 1,612 words
    Forensic Science: Proper Crime Scene Techniques. The word "Forensic" is derived from the Latin forensus, meaning "of the forum."1 In ancient Rome, the forum was where governmental debates were held, but it was also where trials were held -- the court house. From that, forensic science has come to mean the application of the natural and physical science to the resolution of matters within a legal context2. Forensic Science can be viewed as a tripartite structure consisting of 1. Collection: which pertains to the science investigation, 2. Examination: which pertains to the medical investigation and 3. Presentation: which pertains to the courts. A forensic case will involve all aspects of each ...
    Related: crime, crime scene, crime scene investigation, forensic, forensic science, scene investigation
  • Forensic Science: Proper Crime Scene Techniques - 1,612 words
    Forensic Science: Proper Crime Scene Techniques. The word "Forensic" is derived from the Latin forensus, meaning "of the forum."1 In ancient Rome, the forum was where governmental debates were held, but it was also where trials were held -- the court house. From that, forensic science has come to mean the application of the natural and physical science to the resolution of matters within a legal context2. Forensic Science can be viewed as a tripartite structure consisting of 1. Collection: which pertains to the science investigation, 2. Examination: which pertains to the medical investigation and 3. Presentation: which pertains to the courts. A forensic case will involve all aspects of each ...
    Related: crime, crime scene, crime scene investigation, forensic, forensic science, scene investigation
  • Forensic Science: Proper Crime Scene Techniques - 1,612 words
    Forensic Science: Proper Crime Scene Techniques. The word "Forensic" is derived from the Latin forensus, meaning "of the forum."1 In ancient Rome, the forum was where governmental debates were held, but it was also where trials were held -- the court house. From that, forensic science has come to mean the application of the natural and physical science to the resolution of matters within a legal context2. Forensic Science can be viewed as a tripartite structure consisting of 1. Collection: which pertains to the science investigation, 2. Examination: which pertains to the medical investigation and 3. Presentation: which pertains to the courts. A forensic case will involve all aspects of each ...
    Related: crime, crime scene, crime scene investigation, forensic, forensic science, scene investigation
  • Gladitorial Combat - 948 words
    Gladitorial Combat Kyle Keown Mrs. Melony Jones World History 4th 2 November 2000 words The culture of Ancient Rome had a distinct way to entertain its citizens. Besides spending times at the baths, Romans found pleasure and delight in the "games" held at the local coliseum. These games were among the bloodiest displays of public amusement in the history of man. Professional wrestling and boxing today, do not come close to the disgusting horrors that the people of Rome took so much pleasure in observing. Although the games were very bloody and extremely brutal, often killing many men and animals, the Romans enjoyed the scenery of life and death being very near. Watching men fight and eventua ...
    Related: combat, works cited, ancient rome, roman empire, funeral
  • Italian Renaissance Arts Affect On - 914 words
    Italian Renaissance Art's Affect On Italian Renaissance Art's Affect on Today's Culture World History David 1 Many of us today have things in our culture that we appreciate without thinking about where they have come from. The things we enjoy so much could be from another culture, and even another place in time. This document will explore the influence of Italian Renaissance art on today's civilization, which has greatly changed the art of today. The Renaissance was a time period that began in the early 1300's and lasted into the 1600's. It was a time when the philosophies of the ancient Greek and Romans were rediscovered, which took place after the Middle Ages. Many of the philosophies of t ...
    Related: arts, italian, italian renaissance, renaissance, renaissance art, visual arts
  • Julius Caesar - 1,189 words
    ... ore. But the senate hesitated. In the year 50 B.C., Caesar still tried to extend his governership, but to ensure the loyalty of his army he doubled their pay. The senate delivered a crushing blow in the fall. The senate voted and ordered Caesar and Pompeius to give up control of their armies and provinces. Caesar's followers tried to veto it, but the hostile consul ordered Pompeius to defend the Republic with two Legions at Capua and the authority to raise more. Caesar thereupon gathered his own armies and went south. Both commanders were still on speaking terms and Caesar made another proposal; he would relinquish control of all but two of his legions and The province of Cisalpine Gaul ...
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  • Julius Caesar - 441 words
    Julius Caesar William Shakespeare writes the Tragedy of Julius Caesar. This tragic play is based on historical facts of the life of Julius Caesar. It displays the events before his death such as his conquest over Pompeys armies and his coronation to be king and after his death. Furthermore, this play describes the minds and motives of Caesars assassins. He gives a description of Cassius that serves as a prediction on his choices regarding Cassius. In addition, my choices would differ from those of Caesars if I was the exalted ruler. First, in Julius Caesar, Caesar describes Cassius in the first act and he made choices based on his description. Caesar referred to Cassius as having "a lean and ...
    Related: caesar, julius, julius caesar, ancient rome, historical facts
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