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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: great plains

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  • Crossing The Great Plains - 542 words
    CROSSING THE Great Plains The Oregon Trail was an overland emigrant route in the United States from the Missouri River to the Columbia River country, was the way to travel back in the 1840s through the 1860s. In 1843 the "Great Emigration" began and the west would never be the same after the out set of the travelers. The pioneers by wagon train did not, however, follow any single narrow route. In open country the different trains might spread out over a large area, only to converge again for river crossings, mountain passes. In time many alternate routes also developed. They originated at various places on the Missouri, although Independence were favorite starting points, the routes taken al ...
    Related: crossing, great plains, great salt lake, missouri river, blue mountains
  • Black Footed Ferret - 1,603 words
    Black Footed Ferret In the past three decades very few endangered species have been restored to viable populations. The black footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) was believed to be the most endangered mammal in the united states. It is a small mink sized carnivore of the Great plains and intermountain basins The ferrets appear to be obligatory predators on the prairie dogs and once occupied a range essentially identical to that of the prairie dogs. They prey on them and also use their burrows for shelter and nesting. The prairie dogs are considered agricultural pests and competitors with livestock since white settlement first began in the American west. Large scale rodent control programs were ...
    Related: accounting office, endangered species, federal government, crisis, livestock
  • Cowboys - 731 words
    Cowboys Cowboys How they started Cattle ranchers began to move out onto the Great Plains in the mid 1800s In the late 1800s cowboys became popular in the cattle industry. The American cowboys owe their knowledge of how to tame the cattle to vaquerars (the Mexican cowboys). The animals originally were from the ranches in southern Texas formerly operated by Spaniards and Mexicans. The cowboys often called the wild cattle longhorns, which were the huge herds of wild cattle. About one- third of the cowboys were free black men who had moved west after the Civil War. Each year Texas ranches would collect huge herds of cattle and start them northward on what was called the long drive. The cowboys w ...
    Related: brace jovanovich, drinking water, american nation, brown, bacon
  • Crm Comuncation - 1,547 words
    Crm Comuncation In dealing with weather there are many types which can seriously cause damage to people and communities. Especially in the aviation we as pilot have to take into account many consideration in preparing for a flight. For instance, thunderstorms, icing levels, winds aloft, and visibility all play major factors in preparing for a flight. But there are some weather phenomena that can be extremely dangerous to fly into. Hurricanes, wind shear, and tornadoes are just some of the major threatening systems that can cause serious damage to people and places. One of the most interesting systems is the tornado. So what is a tornado? A tornado is a violently rotating column of air, which ...
    Related: atmospheric administration, great plains, missouri river, vapor, drying
  • Cultural Comparisons Ethnocentrism - 1,069 words
    Cultural Comparisons Ethnocentrism Culture Cultural comparisons Ethnocentrism Ethnocentrism is the name given to a tendency to interpret or evaluate other cultures in terms of one's own. This tendency has been, perhaps, more prevalent in modern nations than among preliterate tribes. The citizens of a large nation, especially in the past, have been less likely to observe people in another nation or culture than have been members of small tribes who are well acquainted with the ways of their culturally diverse neighbours. Thus, the American tourist could report that Londoners drive on the wrong side of the street or an Englishman might find some customs on the Continent queer or boorish, merel ...
    Related: cultural relativism, ethnocentrism, culturally diverse, wind power, acquisition
  • Dust Bowl - 752 words
    Dust Bowl The early 1900's were a time of turmoil for farmers in the United States, especially in the Great Plains region. After the end of World War I, overproduction by farmers resulted in low prices for crops. When farmers first came to the Midwest, they farmed as much wheat as they could because of the high prices and demand. Of the ninety-seven acres, almost thirty-two million acres were being cultivated. The farmers were careless in their planting of the crop, caring only about profit, and they started plowing grasslands that were not made for planting Because of their constant plowing year after year and the lack of rainfall, the soil was quickly losing its fertility. With unfertile, ...
    Related: bowl, dust, dust bowl, dust storms, world war i
  • Hemmingway Short Stories - 2,551 words
    ... ation is clearly circling the subject. The characters in the story are also described differently. They are introduced as the American and the girl, showing that there is a age difference between them. The man is never named, and not given much of a personality. The girl, later named Jig, has more of a personality. She has a difficult time making up her mind whether or not to keep the baby and has a problem clearly stating what she thinks to the American. She thinks the abortion can save their relationship, while the man already has distanced himself from her and realized that they can't go back to where they were before. The characters are really mysterious, we know nothing about their ...
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  • History Of Frogs - 1,425 words
    History Of Frogs A Frog is a small, tail less animal that has bulging eyes. Almost all frogs have long back legs. The strong hind legs make the frog able to leap farther than the length of its body. Frogs live on every continent except Antarctica, but tropical regions have the greatest number of species. Frogs are classified as amphibians. Most amphibians, including most frogs, spend part of their life as a water animal and part as a land animal. Frogs are related to toads, but are different from them in a few ways. The giant frog of west-central Africa ranks as the largest frog. It measures nearly a foot (30 centimeters) long. The smallest species grow only 1/2 inch (1.3 centimeters) long. ...
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  • Industrialization - 254 words
    Industrialization a. Why were the Indians treated so unjustly? (12) The American settlers greed was the basis for the injustice forced upon the Indians. At first the Americans simply wanted the land that could be used to grow or create products. Then the Indians were viewed as hostile enemies. This was unfair because the Americans were too greedy to give the Indians the supplies they were promised; therefore, the Indians attacked. The Indians also attacked because the Americans put them on reservations so the settlers could have the rest of the land. The hunters of the West were also forced serious injustice on the Indians. They killed the buffalo by the millions for their hides. The buffalo ...
    Related: industrialization, great plains, labor force, hostile, railroad
  • Legalizing Marijuana - 1,374 words
    Legalizing Marijuana Cannabis sativa or marijuana has been cultivated for over 5,000 years. The plant spreads like milkweed and will eventually run out any other plants nearby. In the wild, or grown with care marijuana can grow to be 3 - 20 feet high. The plant itself can be used for rope, material, medicine or for smoking. But, whatever way you choose to use this plant, it is illegal. It was made a law in the early 1900's that it was illegal to smoke, eat, or get high from this plant. The plant's only legal use was for rope and materials. Even this was controlled by the government though. In the 1960's and 1970's a group of youth stereotyped as Hippies were using marijuana on a regular basi ...
    Related: legalize marijuana, legalizing, legalizing marijuana, marijuana, economic times
  • Pastoralism Is An Economy Based On Herding Pastoralists Maintain Herds Of Animals And Use Their Products To Support Themselve - 1,104 words
    Pastoralism is an economy based on herding. Pastoralists maintain herds of animals and use their products to support themselves directly and to exchange with other civilizations. It is especially associated with such terrain as steppes, rolling hills, grasslands, and the like-areas of low rainfall where cultivation is difficult without irrigation, but where grasses are plentiful enough to support herds of animals.1 Pastoralism was originally founded in the old world. Pastoralists are generally nomadic and usually follow their herds in search of food and water. Pastoral civilizations tend to be warlike and they have a difficult time trying to live at peace with settled agricultural population ...
    Related: economy, wild animals, ancient mesopotamia, food production, desert
  • Physical Geography Of Saskatchewan - 1,829 words
    Physical Geography of Saskatchewan Physical Geography of Saskatchewan Introduction Saskatchewan is situated in the central Prairie between Alberta on the west and Manitoba on the east. Its neighbour on the north is the North West Territories, and on the south it borders with the United States. Saskatchewan is rectangular in shape--it is the only Canadian province none of whose borders was determined by the landform feature like river or mountain range. The province is located in the Central Standard Time and doesn't switch on Daylight Saving Time in summer. The population of Saskatchewan is around one million people with the area of 651 900 km2. Physical and Natural Description Geologic Hist ...
    Related: geography, physical geography, saskatchewan, metamorphic rocks, gulf of mexico
  • President Jackson And The Removal Of The Cherokee Indians - 1,390 words
    President Jackson and the Removal of the Cherokee Indians "The decision of the Jackson administration to remove the Cherokee Indians to lands west of the Mississippi River in the 1830's was more a reformulation of the national policy that had been in effect since the 1790's than a change in that policy." The dictum above is firm and can be easily proved by examining the administration of Jackson and comparison to the traditional course which was carried out for about 40 years. After 1825 the federal government attempted to remove all eastern Indians to the Great Plains area of the Far West. The Cherokee Indians of northwestern Georgia, to protect themselves from removal, made up a constituti ...
    Related: andrew jackson, cherokee, cherokee indian, cherokee nation, jackson, president jackson, removal
  • Rocky Mountains - 3,661 words
    ... rp. Historically, a number of Native American peoples lived in the valley along the Missouri, including the Hidatsa, Crow, Iowa, Arikara, Blackfoot, and Sioux. The region was popular for buffalo hunting and agriculture, and the tribes used the river for commerce. In 1673 French-Canadian explorer Louis Jolliet and French missionary and explorer Jacques Marquette became the first Europeans to discover the Missouri when they came across the lower river during a journey down the Mississippi. The lower river became an important route for fur traders, who began to venture farther up the river. During the Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1804 to 1806, American explorers Meriwether Lewis and Willia ...
    Related: mountains, rocky, rocky mountains, great basin, northern united states
  • Rocky Mountains Or Rockies - 587 words
    Rocky Mountains Or Rockies Rocky Mountains or Rockies, great chain of rugged mountain ranges in western North America, extending from central New Mexico to northeastern British Columbia, a distance of about 3220 km (about 2000 mi). The Great Basin and the Rocky Mountain Trench, a valley running from northwestern Montana to northern British Columbia, border the Rockies on the east by the Great Plains and on the west. The Rocky Mountains form part of the Great, or Continental, Divide, which separates rivers draining into the Atlantic or Arctic oceans from those flowing toward the Pacific Ocean. The Arkansas, Colorado, Columbia, Missouri, Rio Grande, Saskatchewan, and Snake rivers rise in the R ...
    Related: mountains, rocky, rocky mountains, new mexico, national park
  • Rooselvelt - 5,189 words
    ... gation and flood-control projects are part of PWAs legacy. The most spectacular agency designed to promote general economic improvement was the National Recovery Administration (NRA), an organization set up (along with the PWA) by the National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA), which was passed by Congress in June 1933. The NRA was designed to help business help itself. Unfair competition was supposed to be eliminated through the establishment of codes of fair competition; in effect, laws against combinations of large businesses were to be suspended in exchange for guarantees to workers. These guarantees specifically included minimum wages, maximum hours, and the right to bargain as a group ...
    Related: reserve board, secretary of state, prime minister, committee, winston
  • The Characters We Call Gunfighters - 585 words
    The Characters we call Gunfighters The period following the Civil War was a time of great uneasiness. It was an era that gave rise to the Western outlaws. They were bandits, gunfighters, and men guilty of hundreds of crimes, but they were also important in shaping American folklore. Two important factors contributed to the making of these legends. The transition that these men under went from solider to ranch hand or cowboy, and the making of their legends through the media molded the way we perceive gunfighters today. I feel that the media had a major role in creating the characters, legends and hero's that we learn about in history. The Civil War gave many young men a taste of conflict and ...
    Related: works cited, american folklore, great western, ranch, american
  • The Kickapoo Indians - 1,988 words
    The Kickapoo Indians The Kickapoo Indians are Algonkian-speaking Indians, related to the Sauk and Fox, who lived at the portage between the Fox and Wisconsin rivers, probably in present Columbia County, Wis., U.S., when first reported by Europeans in the late 17th century. The Kickapoo were known as formidable warriors whose raids took them over a wide territory, ranging as far as Georgia and Alabama to the southeast; Texas and Mexico to the southwest; and New York and Pennsylvania to the east. Early in the 18th century part of the tribe settled near the Milwaukee River and, after the destruction of the Illinois Indians c. 1765, moved south to Peoria. One band extended as far as the Sangamon ...
    Related: federal indian, indian territory, lake erie, important role, winnebago
  • The Last Frontier Of The United States Was A Great Time Period Where Americans And Immigrants From Around The World Came And - 1,204 words
    The last frontier of the United States was a great time period where Americans and immigrants from around the world came and settled for new land. It was a time where the federal government encouraged western settlement and economic exploitation. The United States of America came of age after the civil war. In a period of less than fifty years, it was transformed from a rural republic to an urban state. The frontier had vanished. Great factories and steel mills, transcontinental railroad lines, flourishing cities, vast agricultural holdings marked the land. And in them came accompanying evils: monopolies tended to develop, factory working conditions were poor, cities developed so quickly tha ...
    Related: american frontier, american revolution, first great, frontier, great plains, last frontier, united states of america
  • The People Of The Kalahari Desert - 1,508 words
    The People of the Kalahari Desert Part One Introduction, Location and Environment The people of the Kalahari desert are extraordinary people. For centuries their hunting and food gathering techniques have enabled them to survive in the difficult environment of the dry, hot and barren Kalahari desert. They are known as the Bushmen. Or the Kung or the Gikwe since Bushmen is rather discriminating because the "Bushmen" live among shrubs and trees and sand and such. The people of Kalahari Desert live in a dry bush desert in South-West Africa and western Bechuanaland, bordered in the North by Lake Ngami and the Okovngo River in the South by the Orange river and west by the Damera Hills. The Kalaha ...
    Related: desert, kalahari, kalahari desert, great plains, modern technology
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