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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: gradual

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  • 19th Century Settlement - 799 words
    19th Century settlement In the early 1800s a number of French explorers visited the south west coast of Australia. The British, who were at war with the French at that time, became concerned that a French presence in the south west of the continent could endanger trade with the eastern colonies. In 1819 Phillip Parker King and his crew patrolled the southwest, although it was not until his second voyage in 1822 that they made landfall on "Rottenest. Settlement of the Swan River Colony began in 1829, and interest was shown almost immediately in Rottnest as a secure place with the potential for salt harvesting, farming and fishing. Rottnest was surveyed with provision for a town in 1830, and i ...
    Related: settlement, physical development, state government, west coast, drowned
  • A Look Into Alzheimers Disease - 634 words
    A look into Alzheimer's Disease The reason that I chose Alzheimer's Disease as the disease that I will report on is because I felt that it is very interesting and common within people over the age of sixty. I believed that I if I need a great deal about this disease, I would understand more about why so many people have become devastated by it. A good friend of my Grandfather's also had the disease but he has passed away. I do know however, that as soon as it was understood that he had the disease, he had to begin to change the way his life worked significantly. For one, he really couldn't go outside alone and he couldn't do much without his wife by his side. He had to stay home most of the ...
    Related: alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, nursing home, best care, significantly
  • A Separate Peace: Chapter 1 - 5,644 words
    ^^^^^^^^^^A SEPARATE PEACE: CHAPTER 1 Have you ever in your life gone through an experience so intense, so joyful, so painful, or just so important at the time, that you could only understand much later what truly happened? Isn't it a fact that when we're in the middle of an experience, we are often unable to think clearly about it because we're too busy feeling the moment's thrill or sadness to stop and come to sensible conclusions? Our high school years are just such a time: of quick growth and self-discovery, of forging as well as breaking friendships, of proving ourselves to others, in the classroom and on the sports field, and a time when we want very much to be individuals and to stick ...
    Related: separate peace, competitive edge, power over, john knowles, legs
  • A Stages Uppsala Internationalization Model - 354 words
    A- STAGES (UPPSALA) INTERNATIONALIZATION MODEL The Model Characteristics: 1- the export development process has a sequential nature -successive stages represent higher degrees of international involvement/commitment; 2- the process is a gradual acquisition, integration and use of knowledge about foreign markets and operations; 3- the process is also one of organizational learning; 4- the model is experience/knowledge-based - the more experience the firm gains in time, the more it is prepared to commit itself to this market and to launch new activities; 5- from this higher commitment the firm will gain experience/market knowledge; 6- internationalization is a slow process, beginning with loca ...
    Related: internationalization, market conditions, development process, business performance, commitment
  • Abolition - 852 words
    Abolition A Stronger Resistance The abolitionist movement in the United States sought to eradicate slavery using a wide range of tactics and organizations. The antislavery movement mobilized many African Americans and some whites who sought to end the institution of slavery. Although both black and white abolitionists often worked together, the relationship between them was intricate. The struggle for black abolitionists was much more personal because they wanted to end slavery and also wanted to gain equal rights for blacks. However, many white abolitionists only sought to end slavery and did not fight for equality for blacks. From these exceedingly contrasting perspectives and the continua ...
    Related: abolition, nat turner, different approaches, lloyd garrison, garrison
  • Acid Rain And North America - 1,891 words
    Acid Rain And North America In the past century, one of the greatest threats to North America's aquatic ecosystem has been the widespread acidification of hundreds of thousands of waterways. Acid rain has effected plant and animal life within aquatic ecosystems, as well as microbiologic activity by affecting the rates of decomposition and the accumulation of organic matter. What causes this poisonous rain, and what can be done to improve North America's water quality and prevent future catastrophes? To answer these questions, we must first examine the cause and formation of acid rain, as well as understand ways to decrease or prevent its formation. Formation of acid rain. Acid deposition, mo ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, america, north america, rain
  • Adc Telecommunications Financial Ratio Analasis - 1,403 words
    Adc Telecommunications Financial Ratio Analasis Accounting 6000 Financial Statement Analysis ADC Telecommunications October 29, 2000 Corporate Background ADC Telecommunications (ADCT) is a communication equipment manufacturer located in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. Since 1952, the company has successfully weathered the tumultuous transformation process of technology. Today, ADC Telecommunications exclusively focuses on manufacturing computer-networking equipment. Increasing demand for fiber optic transmission systems like asynchronous transfer mode (ATM), synchronous optical networks (SONET) and most wireless communications systems, provide significant opportunities for ADCT. The company cur ...
    Related: current ratio, financial ratios, financial statement, quick ratio, ratio, telecommunications, turnover ratio
  • Adolescent Abortion - 1,673 words
    ... em. ADOLESCENT ABORTION LEGALIZATION Less then twenty-five years ago, any women who elected to terminate her pregnancy usually had to resort to illegal, unsanitary, and unsafe means. Abortion was frequently considered a criminal offense committed by the woman and the physician performing the procedure. The Supreme Court cases leading to the legalization of abortion began in 1963 with Griswold v. Connecticut. The court invalidated a Connecticut statute that made possession and use of contraceptives by married couples a criminal offense. The case of Griswold was later expanded to encompass the woman's right not only to prevent but also to terminate her pregnancy. In the case of Roe v. Wade ...
    Related: abortion, adolescent, birth control, young woman, fatal
  • Adult Illiteracy - 3,413 words
    Adult Illiteracy Learning to read is like learning to drive a car. You take lessons and learn the mechanics and the rules of the road. After a few weeks you have learned how to drive, how to stop, how to shift gears, how to park, and how to signal. You have also learned to stop at a red light and understand road signs. When you are ready, you take a road test, and if you pass, you can drive. Phonics-first works the same way. The child learns the mechanics of reading, and when he's through, he can read. Look and say works differently. The child is taught to read before he has learned the mechanics the sounds of the letters. It is like learning to drive by starting your car and driving ahead. ...
    Related: adult, adult literacy, illiteracy, attention deficit, young people
  • Affirmative Action - 1,599 words
    Affirmative Action AFFIRMATIVE ACTION INTRODUCTION Affirmative action is the name of an American social practice through which members of historically disadvantaged racial and/or ethnic groups are given preferential treatment in an effort to compensate for past harm caused to their ancestors. For thirty years, affirmative action was carefully shielded from open, honest evaluation while it simultaneously grew more pervasive along with the federal bureaucracy and welfare state. The recent political upheaval caused by the Republican takeover of Congress in 1994 has opened the door for opponents of affirmative action programs to successfully pursue their gradual elimination. If affirmative actio ...
    Related: action program, affirmative, affirmative action, jossey bass, american people
  • Aging Theories - 1,709 words
    Aging Theories This report outlines the main theories of how the process of aging works. Since researchers have not discovered a universally-accepted theory of aging, the theories discussed are potential explanations of how we age. The likelihood of each hypothesis is considered roughly equal. The different theories discussed focus on the workings of different parts of the body, from the molecular level of DNA mutations and replication, to the organism level of becoming "worn out." Aging is a very complex and gradual process, and its ongoing operation is present to some degree in all individuals. It is a journey to the maturity, as well as to the degeneration of the body. Because aging affec ...
    Related: aging, aging process, cell division, free radicals, gradual
  • Aging Theories - 1,767 words
    ... ter a certain number of divisions, the clock genes are triggered and may produce proteins responsible for cell destruction (Keeton, 1992, 50). Cellular Aging In 1961, a discovery made by Leonard Hayflick showed that normal, diploid cells from such continually Areplaced@ parts of the body as skin, lungs, and bone marrow, divide a limited number of times. Although the cells stop dividing at the point just before DNA synthesis, they do not die. The longer-lived the species, the more divisions the cells undergo. As the age of an individual increases, the number of potential divisions decreases (Ricklefs and Finch, 1995, 29). This discovery was found using fibroblasts, or cells found in the c ...
    Related: aging, aging process, bone fracture, concise encyclopedia, testosterone
  • Alcoholism - 1,948 words
    Alcoholism CUNNING, BAFFLING, POWERFUL, PATIENT AND DEADLY Alcoholism: Today's substance abuse, whether alcohol or drugs, continues to be a major social problem. Common patterns occur in all forms of substance abuse. While some types of substance abuse problems are slightly different in terms of causes and cures, experts agree that there are some do's and don'ts which relate to kicking the abuse habit. If you or a loved one have a substance abuse problem, this article can give you sound advice on understanding what substance abuse is, and what to do about it. In this article, we will refer to alcohol, although the word drug may be used synonymously in place of alcohol. What is Alcoholism? Al ...
    Related: alcoholism, chronic disease, addiction research, real thing, depressed
  • Alternative Approaches To The Treatment Of Diabetes - 1,617 words
    Alternative Approaches To The Treatment Of Diabetes Alternative Approaches to the Treatment of Diabetes Diabetes is a general term for a disease caused by defective carbohydrate metabolism and characterized by abnormally large amounts of sugar in the blood and urine. Diabetes is usually classified into two types. Type I or insulin-dependent diabetes, formerly called juvenile-onset, usually occurs in children and young adults; and, Type II, or non-insulin dependent diabetes (formerly called adult-onset diabetes) is found in persons over 40 years old and progresses slowly (Funk and Wagnalls 183). Diabetes is considered a group of disorders with multiple causes, rather than a single disorder. T ...
    Related: alternative approaches, approaches, dependent diabetes, diabetes, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes
  • Alzheimers - 1,205 words
    Alzheimers Disease Alzheimers Disease is a progressive, degenerative disease that attacks the brain and results in impaired memory, thinking and behavior (Internet). It is a degenerative disease affecting nerve cells of the frontal and temporal lobes of the cerebrum of the brain. The disease is the major cause of presenile dementia (i.e., the loss of mental faculties not associated with advanced age) and is thought to be the largest single cause of senile dementia as well (Britannica, 306). It causes the connections between cells to become ineffective and the cells themselves to shutdown and eventually die (Davies, 1). Alzheimers is a progressive, irreversible, fatal neurologic disorder that ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimers disease, warning signs, mental illness, paranoia
  • Alzheimers Disease - 1,694 words
    Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer's Disease With all of the advanced technology that the medical field possesses today, there is still suffering that occurs from incurable diseases. Alzheimer's Disease is one of those incurable diseases that take the lives of many today. This paper will examine this disease thoroughly by looking at its definition, and discussing general information, facts, and figures. The cause of Alzheimer's Disease, and the much thought about question of if it is genetic or not will disputed. Also the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of Alzheimer's Disease will be addressed. Included will also be tips on how to make the life of an Alzheimer's patient easier. What is Alzheim ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, heart disease, nursing home
  • Alzheimers Disease Is A Progressive Degenerative Disease Of The Brain That Causes Increasing Loss Of Memory And Other Mental - 564 words
    Alzheimers disease is a progressive degenerative disease of the brain that causes increasing loss of memory and other mental abilities. The disease attacks few people before age sixty, but it occurs in about twenty percent of people who live to age eighty-five. The disease is named after the German psychiatrist and neuropathologist Alois Alzheimer, who first described its effects on brain cells in 1907. Symptoms of Alzheimers disease come in three stages: early, late, and advanced. Early stages include forgetfulness of recent events, increasing difficulty in performing intellectual tasks such as accustomed work, balancing a checkbook or maintaining a household. Also, personality changes, inc ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimers disease, brain, progressive, personal hygiene
  • Amanda Fisher - 808 words
    Amanda Fisher February 16, 2001 Bartleby, in Herman Melvilles short story "Bartleby the Scrivener" is a character who lives his life in utter isolation. However, it is obvious from the story that he does affect one persons life. The narrator of the tale, an aged lawyer, is a caring figure, though not unlike most employers, keeps his distance and rationalizes each situation. He transformation into a sympathetic and affected character results solely from his rather limited relationship with his employee, Bartleby. When Melville describes Bartleby, he presents the man as a very innocuous, unassuming figure. "In answer to my advertisement, a motionless young man one morning stood upon my office ...
    Related: amanda, fisher, first person, short story, employee
  • American Revolution - 3,384 words
    American Revolution In the aftermath of the French and Indian War, Britain needed a new imperial design, but the situation in America was anything but favorable to change. Long accustomed to a large measure of independence, the colonies were demanding more, not less, freedom, particularly now that the French menace had been eliminated. To put a new system into effect, and to tighten control, Parliament had to contend with colonists trained in self-government and impatient with interference. One of the first things that British attempted was the organization of the interior. The conquest of Canada and of the Ohio Valley necessitated policies that would not alienate the French and Indian inhab ...
    Related: american, american affairs, american colonies, american population, american revolution, american revolutionary, american revolutionary war
  • Anarchism And Liberalism - 1,399 words
    ... st groups to represent the labor force, minority groups, and any apathetic and helpless citizens. The presence of sub-government groups, such as big industry, are recognized as being insufficient in representing the public's interest and so the liberals call for more regulations to control these sub-governments from abusing their power. This goes right along with the whole philosophy of contemporary liberals in that they don't want to start over and rebuild the government, but rather reform it and ad more regulations to control it. The idea of a ruler goes against the basic stance of anarchism. Proudhon best describes this view when he said, "Whoever puts his hand on me to govern me is u ...
    Related: anarchism, contemporary liberalism, liberalism, free society, individual rights
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