Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: gracchus

  • 9 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • By Tiberius Gracchus Proposal Of The Law Stated In The Lex Agaria, I Speculate That He Is Trying To Help The Poor Citizens Of - 1,452 words
    By Tiberius Gracchus proposal of the law stated in the lex agaria, I speculate that he is trying to help the poor citizens of Rome, and at the same time, benefit the overall condition of the city. The law stated that those holding more than the legal limit of public land must give that land up, and that this land would be redistributed to Roman citizens in small allotments... That Gracchus is trying to help the poorer citizens is shown through the small size of the plot of land given, the provision that a small rent must be paid, and that the land could not be sold. Handing out this land also would benefit the state because, by giving some of these plots to those who had no land, these peopl ...
    Related: gracchus, proposal, tiberius, tiberius gracchus, public land
  • Leadership In Ancient Civilizations - 1,300 words
    Leadership in Ancient Civilizations Leadership in Ancient Civilizations During the period of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire, different leaders exhibited different styles of leadership and employed different political strategies. In addition, these leaders came to power and maintained their control in their own unique ways. Each leader seemed to have his own agenda, which set the tone for that era. Five prominent leaders of this time period were Agricola, Augustus, Julius Caesar, and the brothers Tiberius and Gaius Gracchus. The point to be made with respect to these particular men is related to the obvious correlation between the nature of a leaders agenda and the impact of his reig ...
    Related: ancient civilizations, good leadership, leadership, roman civilization, good leader
  • Octavian Augustus - 1,147 words
    Octavian Augustus Octavian Augustus By Derek Jeter Octavian Augustus (63 B.C.E-14 AD) is known as the first, and one of the greatest, Roman Emperors ever. Octavian enabled the long, peaceful time of the Pax Romana by changing Rome from a fragile, crumbling republican government to a mighty empire. Octavians government was strong enough to withstand weak emperors who mismanaged the Empire. His changes proved to be the cornerstone of the greatest empire the world has ever seen. During the Conflict of Orders, the lower class Romans, or plebeians, forced the upper class Romans, known as patricians, to give them more rights and liberties (Hadas 1969). The Republican government in Rome was establi ...
    Related: augustus, octavian, poor people, public office, separation
  • Origins Of Communism - 1,534 words
    Origins of Communism Origins of Communism Throughout the history of the modern world, man has sought out the perfect government. An invincible system of order. And in our search for this ideal system, the idea of holding property in common has been a reoccurring thought. From early Christian communities to modern Marxist states, socialism and more specifically, communism has had an important role in the development of this ideal system. After the Great French Revolution of 1789-1794, the roots of modern-day communism can be clearly seen. In 1795, Gracchus Babeuf wrote the "Plebeians Manifesto" which stated, for full social and economical equality: "...to establish a common administration; to ...
    Related: communism, private property, joseph stalin, century french, blanc
  • Roman History - 1,542 words
    Roman History Roman History Roman Republican politicians were drawn largely from an ancient elite of wealthy families. These families, known as the nobility, dominated access to the consulships; between them they held over 80% of the consulships in the last century of the Republic. Active politics took place within this framework, and was characterised largely by personal and political feuds between individual members of the elite. Because this elite was defined by office holding (the nobility consisted of those descended from consuls), political activity took place within a context of magistracies and public events. Individual members of the nobility had to pursue careers in politics, not j ...
    Related: history, roman, roman empire, roman history, roman society
  • Rome - 692 words
    Rome Rome is an ancient city located on the western coast of Italy by the Meditterranian Sea.(3:289) The city of Rome was founded, according to the legend, by Romulus in 753 BC. Remus and Romulus were two mythological sons of Mars, the god of war. "T hrough military expansion and colonizations, and by granting citizenship to conquered tribes, the city joined all of Italy south of the Po in the 100-year period before 268 BC." First, the Latin and other tribes were joined, then the Etruscans (a civili zed people north of Rome) and the Greek colonies in the south. "With a large army and several hundred thousand in reserve, Rome defeated Carthage in the 3 Punic Wars, 264-241, 218-201, 149-146, ( ...
    Related: rome, santa maria, first emperor, punic wars, romans
  • Rome, History Of The Accounts Of The Regal Period Have Come Down Overlaid With Such A Mass Of Myth And Legend That Few Can Be - 2,982 words
    Rome, History of. The accounts of the regal period have come down overlaid with such a mass of myth and legend that few can be verified; Roman historians of later times, lacking authentic records, relied on fabrications of a patriotic nature. Following this period, when a republic was established, Rome became a world power and emerged as an empire with extensive boundaries. The Legendary Period of the Kings (753-510 BC) Rome was said to have been founded by Latin colonists from Alba Longa, a nearby city in ancient Latium. The legendary date of the founding was 753 BC; it was ascribed to Romulus and Remus, the twin sons of Rhea Silvia, a vestal virgin and the daughter of Numitor, king of Alba ...
    Related: history, legend, myth, regal, world power
  • The Fall Of The Roman Empire - 1,286 words
    The Fall Of The Roman Empire For men who had easily endured hardship, danger and difficult uncertainty, leisure and riches, though in some ways desirable, proved burdensome and a source of grief. The causes for the breakdown of the early Roman Republic cannot be attributed to a single event, trend or individual, rather it was due to a combination of all three in varying degrees. The principal and fundamental cause was the breakdown of the political checks and balances, particularly the Cursus Honorum from 133 BC onwards. This subversion occurred both accidentally and through the subversive behavior of individuals, unconsciously and consciously undermining the fabric of the republic in their ...
    Related: empire, roman, roman empire, roman republic, great leaders
  • The Functions And History Of The Roman Senate - 1,823 words
    The Functions And History Of The Roman Senate The Functions and History of the Roman Senate In today's modern world representative government is the norm. Nearly all governments are ruled by their citizens via a republic or some other type of governing body. However, in the ancient world, this standard of democratic government had not yet taken hold; political control still belonged to the few elite, rich, and powerful persons and influential families. Thus, we have a contrast between governments of the ancient world and our modern day governments. In other words, the past generally denotes monarchy, empire, or absolute control. While modern government usually implies republic, voting, or de ...
    Related: ancient roman, history, roman, roman republic, roman senate, senate
  • 9 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1