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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: good deeds

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  • A Modern Interpretation Of Everyman The Excerpt - 1,874 words
    A Modern Interpretation of Everyman (the excerpt) Here beginneth a treatise about how God sent the IRS to summon a common taxpayer to come and list everything that the taxpayer may count as tax deductible. This basically sums up any good deeds the taxpayer (as a whole everyone) has committed, such as charity- Rewrite[Enter Sports Commentator]Sports Commentator. Hello out there from TV land, I'm here to give you a clue. By means of this exciting account, I promise you'll enjoy it, too. Basically it's a story, or a forecast or presentation, but anyway, it depicts the state, of our great conglomeration. Of humans, and human affairs, and things we do every day. And the reigning state of human af ...
    Related: everyman, excerpt, interpretation, good thing, richard nixon
  • Are We Civilized - 935 words
    Are we civilized? We are starting to witness the beginning of a new era. It is full of information and technology, and it will decide how the future is going to be. But despite all our new inventions and ideas that show us how we're better off than the generations before us, have we grown in any other ways? Does being civilized only mean to become more advanced technologically, or does it apply to our moral foundation? It is very obvious that society has developed a lot in learning and technology. Today, we have inventions such as the stealth fighter, the home computer and nuclear powered power plants and naval vessels. Things that were imagined many years back have now become today's realit ...
    Related: civilized, paying attention, great society, good deeds, kuwait
  • Ariosto's Orlando Furioso - 661 words
    Ariosto'S Orlando Furioso Even in the classics, an author must have something outrageous to keep his reader's attention. Ariosto, in his Orlando Furioso, does so with winged horses and curses placed upon high ranking officials. The main character in cantos 33-35 is Astolfo, and he starts his journey by riding upon a hippogryph. A hippogryph, in mythology, is a flying animal having the wings, claws, and head of a griffin and the body and hindquarters of a horse. Astolfo rides this winged horse for quite awhile, journey through many different lands. During this time, the hippogryph has control over where Astolfo goes, and they end at Ethiopia. In Ethiopia, it is said "that fire is used in bapt ...
    Related: orlando, adam and eve, good deeds, main character, absolute
  • Aristotles Notion Of Virtue According To Aristotle, Virtue Primarily Involves Rationality And The Use Of A Persons Rationalit - 857 words
    Aristotles Notion of Virtue According to Aristotle, virtue primarily involves rationality and the use of a person's rationality. Rationality and happiness are activities of the soul, and virtue is the excellence of these activities. Humans are the only life forms that have a soul, the source of rationality. Thus, humans have a duty to always use their intellect. Three things are found in the soul: emotions, capacities, and characteristics. Emotions are things humans feel, like anguish or happiness, that are followed by pain or pleasure. Capacities are a persons ability or capacity to experience or express something. Since people are not considered good or bad based on their emotions, virtue ...
    Related: notion, rationality, virtue, decision making, different aspects
  • Aristotles Virtue Theory - 857 words
    Aristotle`s Virtue Theory According to Aristotle, virtue primarily involves rationality and the use of a person's rationality. Rationality and happiness are activities of the soul, and virtue is the excellence of these activities. Humans are the only life forms that have a soul, the source of rationality. Thus, humans have a duty to always use their intellect. Three things are found in the soul: emotions, capacities, and characteristics. Emotions are things humans feel, like anguish or happiness, that are followed by pain or pleasure. Capacities are a persons ability or capacity to experience or express something. Since people are not considered good or bad based on their emotions, virtue ca ...
    Related: virtue, decision making process, decision making, different aspects, decision-making
  • Articles Of Confederation - 631 words
    Articles Of Confederation From 1781 to 1789 the Articles of Confederation provided the United States with an ineffective government, however there were some strong steps taken in the articles to try and make the United States a better country. The articles created a loose confederation of independent states that gave limited powers to a central government, known as Congress. Some actions taken by Congress, such as the Treaty of Paris, and certain powers that were given to them were sometimes beneficial to the United States. Nevertheless, in attempting to limit the power of the central government, the Second Continental Congress created one without sufficient power to govern effectively, whic ...
    Related: articles of confederation, confederation, james madison, market value, armed
  • Benedict Arnold - 1,767 words
    Benedict Arnold On January 14, 1741, Benedict Arnold was born in Norwich, Connecticut. (B Arnold) Arnolds father, also named Benedict, had a drinking problem and his mother Hannah often worried. (B Arnold) Arnold received his schooling at Canterbury. (B Arnold) While away at school, a few of Arnolds siblings passed away from Yellow Fever. (B Arnold) Arnold was a troublesome kid that would try just about anything. (B Arnold) As a rebellious 14-year-old boy, he ran away from home to fight in the French and Indian War. (B Arnold) Later, Benedict Arnold deserted and returned home through the wilderness alone to work with his cousins. (B Arnold) The army had excused him without penalty because of ...
    Related: arnold, benedict, benedict arnold, general george, quebec city
  • Beowulf - 848 words
    Beowulf What Makes a Hero? After spending over a week reading the story "Beowulf", we can all come to the conclusion that he is a hero. Sure, he saves countries from monsters, has incredible strength and wisdom, and is fearless- the typical fictional hero. However, when I hear the word hero, I think in terms of an everyday hero. In my mind, a hero is someone who performs courageous acts even if the consequences can be fatal. A hero doesn't have to be some big muscled guy who beats up bad guys. My example of a hero is a fireman. He/she knows that they might be killed rescuing someone from a burning building, yet they still go in. Why? Probably for the honor and glory that people will give the ...
    Related: beowulf, grendel beowulf, last battle, good deeds, courage
  • Beowulf - 553 words
    Beowulf A hero is a person of distinguished courage who has outstanding qualities and abilities, who is admired for these having these aspects of their character and also admired for brave and noble acts. An Anglo-Saxon hero is a person who has good leadership qualities, is able and willing to provide people with a sense of security, and is willing to go into danger despite possible harm to themselves. These Anglo-Saxon heroes usually were kings or thanes because they distinguished themselves above others by doing a good for the greater of everyone. This person has to be willing to put their own lives on the line for the benefit of others. There are several heroic characteristics, all of whi ...
    Related: beowulf, good leadership, good deeds, leadership qualities, remembrance
  • Beowulf - 545 words
    Beowulf The oldest English epic, Beowulf, although composed twelve centuries ago, uses many of the same ideals and values that exist in modern life and modern literature. These attributes are still important, but they do not occupy every aspect of life as in Anglo- Saxon England. Some of the ideals have little use today, such as fate, while other virtues, such as loyalty, are encouraged and highly respected traits. Other values, like fame, have taken on bad connotations in modern day and are not esteemed as they once were. Fate, the idea that destiny is predetermined and nothing can be done to change that, was highly esteemed in Beowulfs time, but is of little use today. Anglo-Saxon warriors ...
    Related: beowulf, modern life, modern society, mass communication, christian
  • Beowulf Part 1 - 431 words
    Beowulf Part 1 Beowulf Part I The Anglo-Saxons were the members of the Germanic peoples who invaded England. They were people of their own time, language and culture. In the Anglo-Saxon adventure filled tale of Beowulf, the heron Beowulf was, at the time, considered the modern day superman. His character exemplifies the Germanic hero, and consequently the Anglo-Saxon ideal: strong, fearless, bold, loyal, and stoic in his acceptance of fate. With the absence of courtesy, his important role in society and his ideals of chivalry, Beowulf was the definition of a hero in his own time. This novel develops the theme that with honor towards chivalry and faith in yourself, anything can be accomplishe ...
    Related: beowulf, king beowulf, important role, the knight, identical
  • Book Report - 665 words
    Book Report 1 Kings 12:1-24 After King Solomon past away his son Rehoboam took over as the King of Israel. Upon taking command of the throne, the people of Israel made a request of their new King. They asked him to lighten the harsh workload and the heavy yoke put on them by Rehoboam's father, King Solomon. After consulting with his elders as well as with his peers Rehoboam decided not to ease up, but to instead tighten his control even further. But his plan backfired and the people of Israel rebelled and Judah was the only city Rehoboam was able to maintain control of. Rehoboam then gathered up 180,000 fighting men and was going to try and regain control of his Kingdom but God told Shemiah ...
    Related: book report, great temple, queen vashti, good deeds, rain
  • Buddha Vs Zarathustra - 536 words
    Buddha Vs Zarathustra Buddha vs. Zarathustra Why do people suffer? That is a question man has been trying to answer for hundreds of years. Two men attacked this question from very different angles. Their names were Buddha and Zarathustra. Buddha was an Indian and founded the eastern way of thinking. Zarathustra was from Persia and believed in a more western theology. Zarathustra was a wealthy man that lived a normal life until he was twenty years old. He left his family and wandered the country for ten years. Finally an angel appeared to him; the angel told Zarathustra that there was only one God. This God was the creator of the earth and everything good. He had a counter part that was an ev ...
    Related: buddha, zarathustra, right speech, good deeds, founded
  • Buddhism - 1,715 words
    ... Buddha, he could establish a land free of all suffering, where anyone with faith in him could be reborn. Then he backed up this Great Universal Vow with the massive power of innumerable virtues and good deeds, which he performed over many eons of time. Dharmakara successfully fulfilled his Great Vow, and became Amida Buddha. In the Larger Pure Land Sutra, which Shinran referred to in his masterwork, the Kyogyoshinsho, as the True Teaching, Sakyamuni describes in detail the wondrous world in the western part of the universe which Amida created, a world free from defilement and pain. Amida says to us, in essence, "You who rely on the saving power of my embrace, rather than on your own sel ...
    Related: buddhism, young children, self determination, cause and effect, runs
  • Buddhism And Confucianism - 1,123 words
    Buddhism And Confucianism Throughout history, great civilizations and people have risen and fallen, and during their fleeting existence, religious activities have assumed important functions in those societies. Confucianism, Buddhism, and Islam, are three legacies left by great men, which still have a profound affect on society. Like with all human inventions, though, these three philosophies are all relative to each other : They are comparable in their simplicity of beliefs, the emphasis they placed on the role of women within their society, and the transformation into different sects in later years; but differ from each other in their emphasis in each field respectively. The basic doctrine ...
    Related: buddhism, confucianism, golden age, great world, publicly
  • Catagorical Imperative - 1,590 words
    Catagorical Imperative The only acceptable motive for a moral action is that it should be done as a sense of moral duty. Is this a justifiable claim? Before it is possible to analyse whether the statement, The only acceptable motive for a moral action is that it should be done as a sense of moral duty, is a justifiable claim we must consider what ones moral duty is and if is it dependant or independent on the consequence of its action? For example we could state ones moral duty is never to lie. It is popularly believed that to lie is detrimental to ones own reputation and often causes emotional and social damage. But what if this principal causes damage itself. Truth telling for a negative m ...
    Related: categorical imperative, imperative, good deeds, ten commandments, corresponds
  • Changing Views Of The Letter A - 274 words
    Changing Views Of The Letter A The perception of Hester's A has changed throughout the novel. In the beginning, the scarlet letter on her chest was a symbol of her sin. It was intended to be part of her punishment by providing her with humiliation, much like on the scaffolding scene. In about the middle of the novel, the meaning of the letter changes. As mentioned earlier in the novel, Hester spends her spare time helping those less fortunate than her. She was a self-ordained sister of Mercy(Hawthorne 148). The scarlet letter on her chest was no longer a symbol of her sin but rather a symbol of her calling (Hawthorne 148). The letter gave comfort to those who were sick, it had shined on thos ...
    Related: scarlet letter, the scarlet letter, good deeds, book reports, badge
  • Chinese Attitudes Towards Death - 1,976 words
    ... c. 1989. Throughout the history of mankind, death has always been a fascination. People have always wondered about the causes of death, the aftermath of death, and whether it could be stopped. Among these people were the Chinese, who like many other people, believed there was life after death. They performed certain rituals to help them along their way. Chinese attitudes toward death are reflected in funerary rituals, Buddhist philosophy and reverence for the deceased. Death is a very important issue to the Chinese people. The son of a family has the obligation to give his parents a proper funeral. This includes such essential elements as; a large coffin, a funeral procession, a well-ch ...
    Related: chinese, chinese people, chinese tradition, death & dying, life after death, traditional chinese
  • Concept Of Karma - 1,650 words
    Concept Of Karma MIDTERM EXAMINATION What is the relation, if any, of the concept of varna to the concept of karma? Two major concepts of the Hindu religion are varna and karma. While at first glance it may not appear that they are related, they in fact do have a direct correlation. The combination of the caste system and the concept of karma have an important part in explaining the consequences of life for the Hindu followers. Varna refers to the caste system. The caste system was divided into four categories. The Brahmins, the Kshatriyas, the Vaisyas, and the Shudras. There were also the untouchables. The Brahmins were the priests. The leaders were the Kshatriyas. The Vaisyas were the comm ...
    Related: karma, compare and contrast, caste system, british government, debate
  • Emancipation - 1,369 words
    Emancipation Of Jews The transition of Jews through history is one, which is complex and took place over a long period. There are many factors, which contributed to the change of the status of Jews within their world and changes in their status as well; these changes affected the religious and cultural values of European Jews, which lead to an alteration in their own perception, as well as the surrounding populace. There are several opinions as to how non- Jews perceive the issues that led to Emancipation of Jewish people. Prior to the period of Emancipation there were three main characteristics which defined the traditional Jewish communities of Europe. These three aspects are community, au ...
    Related: emancipation, age of reason, christian world, european jews, behaviour
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