Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: gold rush

  • 51 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • A Gold Rush Leads To War - 1,304 words
    A Gold Rush Leads to War A Gold Rush Leads to War The American Civil War (1861-1865) and the Reconstruction period that followed were the bloodiest chapters of American history to date. Brother fought brother as the population was split along sectional lines. The issue of slavery divided the nation's people and the political parties that represented them in Washington. The tension which snapped the uneasy truce between north and south began building over slavery and statehood debates in California. In 1848, settlers discovered gold at Sutter's Mill, starting a mass migration. By 1849, California had enough citizens to apply for statehood. However, the debate over whether the large western st ...
    Related: gold rush, rush, senate race, democratic party, invalid
  • A Gold Rush Leads To War - 1,266 words
    ... and Britain gave up any serious hopes of a Confederate victory. With Britain's vote of confidence also went the possibility of European support for the Confederacy. Without this vital link with the outside world, the Confederacy lost all advantage in the war. Amidst all the turmoil of the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, ending slavery in all territories, including the South, which Lincoln continued to insist was under Union jurisdiction. Recognition of the Proclamation became a required element of Lincoln's "ten-percent plan", whereby 10% of the population of any seceded state could reform the state government and apply for readmission ...
    Related: gold rush, rush, radical republicans, robert e lee, alabama
  • 15 Geog 123 - 1,575 words
    15 - GEOG - 123 Anthony November 22, 2000 Travels In Alaska Travels in Alaska takes readers on a trip to Alaska through the vivid descriptions of the author, John Muir. The book is based on journals Muir wrote during his visits to Alaska in 1879, 1880, and 1890. These chronicles of his journey relate his observations of nature, glaciers, and the many people he met. Traveling on foot, by canoe, and dogsled Muir experienced excitement discovering unfamiliar types of lands and animals. Each summer Muir and his new found Presbyterian missionary friend S. Hall Young accompanied by Tlingit Indian guides launched extensive voyages of discovery in a thirty foot canoe. John Muir was a naturalists who ...
    Related: typical american, john muir, gold rush, oval, exploration
  • Alcatraz Island And Prison - 1,993 words
    Alcatraz Island And Prison Alcatraz Island has quite a distinct history. Many people know that Alcatraz served as a federal prison, but most are reluctant to know that this island served as fort. Built before the Civil War, it served two main purposes. First, that it was to guard the San Francisco bay area from enemy ships against a foreign invasion, and second, to hold hostage prisoners of war or POW's as they were called. In this report, I'll show you how this fortress came to be a federal prison, why it is no longer in operation today, and most importantly, to show why it was built in the first place. When the great Gold Rush of 1849 first started, California grew from what would be consi ...
    Related: alcatraz, federal prison, military prison, prison population, state prison
  • California - 1,064 words
    California California was the 31st state, which received its statehood on Sept. 9, 1850 , and nickname is the Golden State. The bird is the California Valley Quail; the flower is the golden poppy; the tree is the California Redwood; and the state motto is Eureka (I have Found It). There are many sights to see in the state of California. Besides all the big metropolitan cities, there is the Golden Gate Bridge, Chinatown, and Fishermans Wharf in San Francisco. Also there is the San Diego Zoo, Sea World, Yosemite and Sequoia National Park, and any of the mountains in the northern part of the state. In addition to that, you can see Disneyland and the countless numbers of television and movie stu ...
    Related: california, california coast, northern california, southern california, central valley
  • California Golden Rush - 1,350 words
    California Golden Rush Shortly after the acquisition of California from Mexico a man by the name of John Sutter arrived in East San Francisco Bay in 1839. Born in Germany he had to leave because he was unable to pay his creditors. With plenty of charm and letters from friends he convinced the Mexican governor of California to award him a land grant of more than 50,000 acres. John Sutter built a stockade and a fort and soon after became referred to as Captain Sutter, and his riverbank establishment Sutters Fort. Sutter chose a location on the south fork of the American River, 50 miles to the south of his fort, to build a sawmill. (Pic. 1) A millrace was dug and wooden gates were opened period ...
    Related: california, gold rush, golden, rush, american history
  • California Golden Rush - 1,379 words
    ... week and often seven. Often men would be removing the sand knee deep in ice-cold water for hours on end. One miner summarized the labors of mining in these terms: "Mining is the hardest work imaginable and an occupation which very much endangers health. A weakly man might about as well go to digging his grave as to dig gold."(Rohrbough, 138). Few forty-niners were prepared for the incredibly hard work. Working fifty pans of dirt in a ten hour day was a reasonable goal. But digging the dirt to fill those pans, sorting it out, and panning for the gold became more work than most gold seekers had anticipated. For a man who could endure hardships, could handle the incredible amount of labor, ...
    Related: angeles california, california, california gold rush, california press, california university, gold rush, golden
  • Call Of The Wild - 402 words
    Call Of The Wild Call of the Wild Jack London's thrilling epic tale of adventure and bravery, through the eyes of a part St. Bernard, part German Shepherd named Buck. Our story opens with the author describing the lifestyle of this pampered dog on the premises of his master's home, Judge Miller, in the Santa Clara valley. John London describes a particular gold rush that transpired in 1897 and it was named the Klondike gold rush. Very early in the story line, Buck is kidnapped by Manuel, one of the gardener's helpers, who's major weakness was gambling. Buck was sold to two men named Francois and Perrault. Buck was shipped to Alaska to serve as a sled dog during the Klondike gold rush. One of ...
    Related: call of the wild, the call of the wild, gold rush, german shepherd, ancestry
  • Call Of The Wild By Jack London 1876 1916 - 1,843 words
    Call of the Wild by Jack London (1876 - 1916) Call of the Wild by Jack London (1876 - 1916) Type of Work: Adventure novel Setting Northland (Alaska); the goldrush of the 1890s Principal Characters Buck, a large, intelligent and well-bred dog Spitz, a cruel lead sled dog John Thornton, Buck's Northiand master Story Overveiw Buck, a huge four-year-old Scottish Shepherd-Saint Bernard cross-breed, lived a life of ease at Judge Miller's Santa Clara Valley estate. As the judge's loyal companion, working with his sons, and guarding his grandchildren, Buck ruled over all things - humans included. Combining his mother's intelligence with the size and strength of his father, Buck became the undisputed ...
    Related: call of the wild, jack, jack london, london, the call of the wild
  • Charlie Chaplain - 1,872 words
    Charlie Chaplain Charlie Chaplin was born on April 15, 1889, in London, England to Charles Chaplin, Sr., and Hannah Hill. He was taught to sing before he could talk and danced just as soon as he could walk. At a very young age Chaplin was told that he would be the most famous person in the world. When Charlie was five years old he sang for his mother on stage. Everyone in the audience loved him and threw their money onto the stage. When Chaplin was eight, he appeared in a clog dancing act called "Eight Lancashire Lads" Once again he was loved by the audience and he was excited with the attention he received. Charlie's half-brother , Sidney, became his agent and when Charlie was ten years old ...
    Related: chaplain, charlie, charlie chaplin, york times, modern times
  • Charlie Chaplin - 630 words
    Charlie Chaplin Charles Spencer Chaplin was born on April 16, 1889 in Walworth, London, and lived a Dickensian childhood, shared with his brother, Sydney, that included extreme poverty, workhouses and seeing his mother's mental decline put her into an institution. Both his parents, though separated when he was very young, were music hall artists, his father quite famously so. But it was his mother Charlie idolized and was inspired by during his visits backstage while she performed, to take up such a career for himself. He achieved his ambition when he joined a dancing troop, the Eight Lancashire Lads, and this eventually led onto parts in Sherlock Holmes and Casey's Court Circus. Sydney, mea ...
    Related: chaplin, charlie, charlie chaplin, lone star, gold rush
  • Clipper Ships - 288 words
    Clipper Ships Clipper ships were extremely fast sailing ships developed primarily by the United States between the 1830's and 1860's. Clippers' did not have a final definition written in stone, but did share certain characteristics such as a sharp hull (designed for speed, not for cargo capacity) and a heavy and lofty square rig. The origin of the clipper is debatable. Some believe that it was descended from the French frigate of the late 1700's. Other's believe that it originated from the early Baltimore clipper's. It is highly probable that it was designed by many ship builders who combined their experience. The first American clippers like the Rainbow and the Sea Witch, were built in New ...
    Related: san francisco, california gold rush, gold rush, sharp, mckay
  • Cockatiels - 358 words
    Cockatiels Some of our sore throats are caused by a "strep infection" and this bacteria can be spread to your cockatiel from a sneeze or a cough. A bacterium called E. coli is normally present in our intestines, but it is not a normal resident in the intestines of cockatiels. So be sure that you wash your hands after using the toilet and before handling your cockatiel or its food. Seeds, how do you know if they are alive and nutritious? Sprout them! If less than 75 % of the seeds sprout, they have died and so their nutritional value. Here's how: Place some seeds on a container covered with a paper towel. Soak the seeds with water. Spray seeds daily to keep them moist. The seeds will start t ...
    Related: gold rush, stained glass, wine, pans
  • Colonial Jamestown - 982 words
    Colonial Jamestown Colonial Jamestown In 1606 King James I set two companies, the London and the Plymouth, out with three instructions: find gold, find a route to the South Seas, and find the Lost Colony of Roanoke. Five months later, and forty-five men less, the London Company landed on a semi-island along the banks of a river the Indians knew as Powhatans River. On May 13, 1607, the first permanent British colony had been established in the form of a triangular fort. The men named their fort Jamestown, in honor of their King, and named their land Virginia, in honor or Queen Elizabeth I, the Virgin Queen. The company defined Virginia as the entire North American coast between 30 and 45N, an ...
    Related: colonial, jamestown, work force, virginia company, economy
  • Constitution - 1,417 words
    Constitution When the Constitution of the United States was first created in 1787, its purpose was to unify our country. However, by 1850, the United States had become 'source of sectional discord and tension and ultimately contributed to the failure of the union it had created.' What happened during the 63 years after it was first established to 'contribute to the failure of the union it had created?' One must look at what the Constitution promoted to make the country unified and what it did to make it disunified. Compromises such as 3/5, the Missouri, and the tariff of 1850 all helped to unify and shape our country. However, compromises such as the Fugitive Slave Law, Popular Sovereignty, ...
    Related: constitution, three-fifths compromise, political power, fair trial, strict
  • Cornelius Vanderbilt - 405 words
    Cornelius Vanderbilt Vanderbilt was born to a poor family and quit school at the age of 11 to work for his Father who was a boater. When he turned 16 he persuaded his mother to give him a $100 dollar loan for a boat to start his business. He opened a transport and freight service Between New York and Staten Island for eighteen cents a trip. He repaid the loan with an $1,000 dollars. Vanderbilt later received a government contract to supply the forts around New York. Large profits allowed him to build a schooner and two other vessels for trade. Vanderbilt got his name from being the "commander" of the biggest vessel. By 1817 he possessed $9,000 dollars. Vanderbilt then sold his interests and ...
    Related: cornelius, cornelius vanderbilt, vanderbilt, vanderbilt university, new jersey
  • Decline In Union Membership In Australia - 1,584 words
    Decline In Union Membership In Australia TOPIC - The major issue tody facing the Australian trade union movement has been the decline in union density. What have been the causes, and how have the unions responded to the challenge. Figures released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) in 2000, show that the decline in Australian union membership continues, despite the efforts of the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU), to stop the slide. The ABS reports that trade union membership has dropped to 28 percent of the total workforce, compared to 1992, where there was 40 percent. (Australian Bureau of Statistics 2000.) Previous ABS findings show that these recent figures are part of ...
    Related: australia, decline, membership, trade union, union members, union membership
  • Federation - 493 words
    Federation The move to federation was not an easy one; there was lots of debating and disagreement, as Alfred Deakin wrote in 1900 its accomplishment must always appear to have been secured by a series of miracles. It was not until the late 1880s that a movement towards federation really started to gather strength. Before this the colonies held the believe that federation would do little for them, they were too busy in there own local problems. However a sense of nationalism was growing and Australia was primarily an Anglo Saxon, English speaking country and Australians were determined to keep it that way. By the 1880s 70% of Australian people were native born, these Australians regarded Au ...
    Related: federation, south wales, english speaking, prime minister, compulsory
  • Geography Of Indonesia And Australia - 1,091 words
    Geography of Indonesia and Australia Geography of Indonesia and Australia Indonesia and Australia are nations located southeast of Asia, separated by the Timor Sea and the Java Trench. Both have undergone challenges in economy, government, and demography that are both similar and quite different from the other. Indonesia is"the worlds most expansive archipelagic (fragmented) state" (Blij 503) with multiple heritages and cultures. Australia has been slowly declining over the past century and continues to economically disintegrate. According to records kept on the economy, government, and demography, both Australia and Indonesia are continuing to be recognized as similar and distinct in their ...
    Related: australia, geography, indonesia, east coast, natural resources
  • George Meade - 620 words
    George Meade George Meade Do you know who was the general for the Second Battle of Bull Run? Everyone kGeorge Meadenowswhat the Second Battle of Bull Run is but who was the general? Some people even knowthat the North won that battle. Most people do not know that General George Meadedefeated General Lee at that battle. General George Mead accomplished much duringwartime.General George Meade had many accomplishments during wartime. First of all, hedefeated General Lee at the Second Battle of Bull Run. Why would not General Meadecrush General Lee at this battle and end the war there? Facts say that heavy fog and rainforced Meade to stop. Likewise, on June 1, !863 a surprise encounter forced hi ...
    Related: general george, george gordon, meade, gold rush, first battle
  • 51 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3