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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: georgia

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  • Education And Early Life Martin Luther King, Jr, Was Born In Atlanta, Georgia, The Oldest Son Of Martin Luther King Sr, A Bap - 1,951 words
    EDUCATION AND EARLY LIFE Martin Luther King, Jr., was born in Atlanta, Georgia, the oldest son of Martin Luther King Sr., a Baptist minister, and Alberta Williams King. His father was a pastor at an immense Atlanta church, The Ebenezer Baptist church, which had been founded by Martin Luther King Jr.'s maternal grandfather. King Jr. was an ordained Baptist minister at the age of 18. King attended the local segregated public schools, where he excelled. He attended nearby Morehouse College at age 15 and earned his bachelor's degree when he graduated. When he graduated with honors from, Crozer Seminary located in Pennsylvania in 1951, he went to Boston University where he earned a doctoral degre ...
    Related: alberta williams king, early life, luther, luther king, martin, martin luther, martin luther king jr
  • Georgia - 1,414 words
    Georgia Georgia The state of Georgia has a total area of 152,750 sq km (58,977 sq mi), including 2618 sq km (1011 sq mi) of inland water and 122 sq km (47 sq mi) of coastal waters over which the state has jurisdiction. The state is the 24th largest in the country and has the largest land area of any state east of the Mississippi River. Georgia has a top range north to south of 515 km (320 mi) and east to west of 441 km (274 mi). The mean elevation is about 180 m (about 600 ft). Georgia occupies parts of six natural regions, or physiographic provinces. They are the Atlantic Coastal Plain, the Gulf Coastal Plain, the Piedmont, the Blue Ridge province, the Ridge and Valley province, and the App ...
    Related: georgia, georgia state, municipal government, political issues, planters
  • Georgia Keeffe - 1,006 words
    ... he country. She took a leave of absence from the teaching job and later resigned. It's possible that there was pressure from the community to encourage her resignation. One good reason was for what people called radical views, which she had concerning the United States' entry into the war in Europe along with other rebel opinions that were shocking to the small Texas town. She was encouraged by Stieglitz to return to New York. By this time he had fallen in love with O'Keeffe and wanted to pursue a relationship. He being in an unhappy marriage, had moved out from the family home and into his studio. She boarded a train in June of 1918 to return to New York, Stieglitz, and to a new life th ...
    Related: georgia, keeffe, new mexico, american, backpacking
  • Georgia Okeefe - 1,140 words
    Georgia O'keefe * Georgia O'Keeffe is one of the most influential artists there is today. Her works are valued highly and are quite beautiful and unique. As a prominent American artist, Georgia O'Keeffe is famous for her images of gigantic flowers, city-scapes and distinctive desert scenes. All of these different phases represent times in her life. Throughout the seventy years of her creative career, Georgia O'Keeffe continually made some of the most original contributions to the art of our time. As Georgia O'Keeffe's awareness of her sexuality heightened, she started to paint marvelous original abstractions in exuberant rainbows or colors. These colors seemed to celebrate her happiness. One ...
    Related: georgia, georgia o'keeffe, deep blue, york city, gigantic
  • Georgia Okeeffe - 1,369 words
    Georgia O'keeffe Georgia O'Keeffe was an artist of world renown but a person of mysterious character. She lived a unique life which was not accepted as moral by most people. She surrounded herself with artistic, creative minds and carefully selected her friends and confidants. Events in her youth influenced her actions and artwork for almost 100 years. O'Keeffe moved about the country, a lover of travel who never was satiated. She came from an eccentric family with mixed ethnic heritage, and the women around her were strong and self- confident. Her life was an epic tale, worthy of retelling. On November 15, 1887, Georgia was second born of seven children to Ida and Francis O'Keeffe. Living i ...
    Related: georgia, georgia o'keeffe, boarding school, york city, uncertain
  • Georgia Okeeffe - 1,006 words
    ... he country. She took a leave of absence from the teaching job and later resigned. It's possible that there was pressure from the community to encourage her resignation. One good reason was for what people called radical views, which she had concerning the United States' entry into the war in Europe along with other rebel opinions that were shocking to the small Texas town. She was encouraged by Stieglitz to return to New York. By this time he had fallen in love with O'Keeffe and wanted to pursue a relationship. He being in an unhappy marriage, had moved out from the family home and into his studio. She boarded a train in June of 1918 to return to New York, Stieglitz, and to a new life th ...
    Related: georgia, new mexico, ceramics, studio
  • Georgia Okeeffe - 1,003 words
    Georgia O'Keeffe Georgia Totto O'Keeffe was born in the year on November 15, 1887. She was one of seven children and spent most of her childhood on a farm, with the typical farm animals and rolling hills. O'Keeffe's aunt, not her mother, was mostly responsible for raising her. O'Keeffe did not care much for her aunt, she once referred to her as, "the headache of my life." She did, however, have some admiration for her aunt's strict and self disciplined character. O'Keeffe was given her own room and less responsibility. The younger sisters had to do more chores and share close living conditions. A younger sister stated that O'Keeffe always wanted things her way, and if she didn't get them her ...
    Related: georgia, georgia o'keeffe, avant garde, the girl, aunt
  • Georgia Okeeffe - 1,004 words
    ... the country. She took a leave of absence from the teaching job and later resigned. It's possible that there was pressure from the community to encourage her resignation. One good reason was for what people called "radical views", which she had concerning the United States' entry into the war in Europe along with other rebel opinions that were shocking to the small Texas town. She was encouraged by Stieglitz to return to New York. By this time he had fallen in love with O'Keeffe and wanted to pursue a relationship. He being in an unhappy marriage, had moved out from the family home and into his studio. She boarded a train in June of 1918 to return to New York, Stieglitz, and to a new life ...
    Related: georgia, new mexico, hotel, media
  • In The 1971 Supreme Court Case Of Furman V Georgia, The Constitutionality Of The - 1,071 words
    In the 1971 Supreme court case of Furman V. Georgia, the constitutionality of the death penalty was challenged. The majority opinion held that although the way it was being applied was unconstitutional the death penalty itself was constitutional. They held it unconstitutional because since it was applied arbitrarily and with apparent racial and economic bias it was cruel and unusual. In Weems v. United states (1910) the Supreme Court held that a punishment could be considered cruel and unusual if it is excessive. In Dulles v. Trop the court held that "the basic concept underlying the 8th amendment is nothing less than the dignity of man." According to the court if a punishment denies someone ...
    Related: constitutionality, court case, furman, supreme court, human dignity
  • Martin Luther King, Jr Was Born At Noon Tuesday, January 15, 1929, At His Home In Atlanta, Georgia He Was First Named Michael - 443 words
    Martin Luther King, Jr. was born at noon Tuesday, January 15, 1929, at his home in Atlanta, Georgia. He was first named Michael Luther King Jr., and later changed his name to Martin, after his father. He was the first son and second child born to the reverend Martin Luther King, Sr., and Alberta Williams King, a schoolteacher. Growing up as an African American in Georgia, Martin experienced and suffered discrimination throughout his boyhood. This discrimination against black people was cruel and demoralizing. Martin Luther King Jr. told once of an experience he had riding a bus with his schoolteacher from Macon to Atlanta, "the driver started cursing us out and calling us black sons of bitch ...
    Related: atlanta georgia, georgia, luther, luther king, martin, martin luther, martin luther king jr
  • On August 14, 1851 In Griffin, Georgia, John Henry Holliday Was Born To Henry Burroughs And Alice Jane Holliday Their First C - 1,401 words
    On August 14, 1851 in Griffin, Georgia, John Henry Holliday was born to Henry Burroughs and Alice Jane Holliday. Their first child, Martha Eleanora, had died on June 12, 1850 at six months of age. When he married Alice Jane McKay on January 8, 1849, Henry Burroughs was a druggist by trade and, later became a wealthy planter, lawyer, and during the War between the States, a Confederate Major. Church records state: "John Henry, infant son of Henry B. and Alice J. Holliday, received the ordinance of baptism on Sunday, March 21, 1852, at the First Presbyterian Church in Griffin." Alice Jane died on September 16, 1866. This was a terrible blow to young John Henry for he and his mother were very c ...
    Related: alice, burroughs, jane, john henry, good intentions
  • On August 14, 1851 In Griffin, Georgia, John Henry Holliday Was Born To Henry Burroughs And Alice Jane Holliday Their First C - 1,429 words
    ... Clanton, his sons, Ike, Phin, and Billy, and the McLaury brothers lost no time expressing their negative feelings for Doc and his gang. Doc had become quite famous as a gunman by the time he had reached Tombstone. Several men had died in encounters with him. At any rate, Holliday was a welcome addition to the Earp's fight with the Cowboy faction. Doc and Kate's arguments were frequent, but not really serious until Kate got drunk and abusive. Doc, at this point, decided that enough was enough and threw her out. Sheriff Behan and Deputy Stilwell found Kate on one of her drunken binges, still berating Doc for throwing her out. They sympathized with her and fed her more whiskey, and then pe ...
    Related: alice, burroughs, jane, john henry, post office
  • 5 Most Influential People In American History - 1,556 words
    5 Most Influential People In American History The United Sates has had a short yet complex history in its two hundred and twenty-four years. She has produced millions and millions of great individuals. These great minds have shaped what America is today. Others, however, have personally molded this magnificent nation with their own acts. John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson are the most influential builders of the United States of America. John Adams was born loyal to the English Crown but evolved into the second President of the Free World. As a lawyer, Adams emerged into politics as an opponent of the Stamp Act and was a leader in the Revolutionary gro ...
    Related: american, american congress, american history, american revolution, american system, history, influential
  • 65279 The Life And Works Of James Weldon Johnson - 1,420 words
    THE LIFE AND WORKS OF JAMES WELDON JOHNSON James Weldon Johnson was a writer, diplomat, professor, and editor,who also described himself as a man of letters and a civil rights leader. Even though, he is no longer living, James Weldon Johnson has left much abouthis contributions to African American literature. Johnson was born June 17,1871 in Jacksonville, Florida to James and Helen Louise (Dallied) Johnson. Johnsons father, James Johnson, was born a freeman and was of mixed ancestry. He was a headwaiter in St. James Hotel. Mr. Johnson taughthis son how to speak Spanish as a young boy. Johnsons mother, Helen Johnson, was born a free woman in the West Indies. Mrs. Helen was awoman of French an ...
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  • A Gold Rush Leads To War - 1,304 words
    A Gold Rush Leads to War A Gold Rush Leads to War The American Civil War (1861-1865) and the Reconstruction period that followed were the bloodiest chapters of American history to date. Brother fought brother as the population was split along sectional lines. The issue of slavery divided the nation's people and the political parties that represented them in Washington. The tension which snapped the uneasy truce between north and south began building over slavery and statehood debates in California. In 1848, settlers discovered gold at Sutter's Mill, starting a mass migration. By 1849, California had enough citizens to apply for statehood. However, the debate over whether the large western st ...
    Related: gold rush, rush, senate race, democratic party, invalid
  • A Gold Rush Leads To War - 1,266 words
    ... and Britain gave up any serious hopes of a Confederate victory. With Britain's vote of confidence also went the possibility of European support for the Confederacy. Without this vital link with the outside world, the Confederacy lost all advantage in the war. Amidst all the turmoil of the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, ending slavery in all territories, including the South, which Lincoln continued to insist was under Union jurisdiction. Recognition of the Proclamation became a required element of Lincoln's "ten-percent plan", whereby 10% of the population of any seceded state could reform the state government and apply for readmission ...
    Related: gold rush, rush, radical republicans, robert e lee, alabama
  • A Good Man Is Hard To Find - 1,311 words
    A Good Man Is Hard To Find A Look at Flannery O'Connor's "A Good Man is Hard to Find" By Amy Carr In the short story A Good Man is Hard to Find, Flannery O'Connor uses many different tactics to accurately portray the south in the 1950's. O'Connor uses her style, themes, and point of view to tell a story of a family outing gone wrong. The story involves a grandmother, her only son and his wife, and their two bratty children, June Star and John Wesley. On their way to Florida, the grandmother convinces the family to detour to see an old house, and while heading towards their destination, the car overturns. The much-feared criminal, The Misfit, an escaped murderer, encounters the family, and of ...
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  • A Good Man Is Hard To Find O Conner - 1,085 words
    ... the back window. He waved. 'He didn't have any britches on,' June Star said. 'He probably didn't have any,' the grandmother explained. 'Little niggers in the country don't have things like we do. If I could paint that picture,' she said. The grandmother's pretty picture is ruined when the little boy shows his bum to her. The old women's attempt to look beyond a blatant reality and make it pretty is being mocked by O'Connor. The author has blended the line between the satirical and the lyrical to form a beauty that would not be considered a standard pretty picture. The same blending of the satirical and the lyrical occurs later in the story with the children playing with Red Sammy's monke ...
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  • A Loyalist And His Life - 1,490 words
    A Loyalist And His Life The called me M.J., that stood for Michael Jones. It was the early part of April in 1760 when I departed an English port and headed across the waters for the North American colonies where I planned to settle, start a family, and begin what I hoped to be a very prosperous life. It was the summer if 1760 when I planted my feet and my heart in Boston along with several black slaves that I purchased when I arrived here. I brought a hefty 10,000 British pounds in my purse, which was my entire life savings. I was twenty-two years old, turning twenty-three in the fall. I had heard so many wonderful things about this place and I could not wait to get here. When I first arrive ...
    Related: common sense, north american, american colonies, atlantic, personally
  • A More Perfect Union: - 1,022 words
    ... e power to regulate trade, the southern states would be nothing more than overseers for the Northern States. On August 21 the debate over the issue of commerce became very closely linked to another explosive issue--slavery. When Martin of Maryland proposed a tax on slave importation, the convention was thrust into a strident discussion of the institution of slavery and its moral and economic relationship to the new government. Rutledge of South Carolina, asserting that slavery had nothing at all to do with morality, declared, Interest alone is the governing principle with nations. Sherman of Connecticut was for dropping the tender issue altogether before it jeopardized the convention. Ma ...
    Related: more perfect union, articles of confederation, bill of rights, northern states, mason
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