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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: geopolitical

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  • Canadas Geopolitical Role In The Future - 832 words
    Canada's Geopolitical Role In The Future Canada is currently sitting in an economic catastrophe, our unemployment is high, production low, and our deficit is increasing at a rapid pace. We are one of the few first world countries, and we need to strengthen our economy. Once we fortify our economy, our geopolitical role will increase. Geopolitics is defined as the study of a two-way relationship between political beliefs and actions on one side and any of the usual concerns of geography on the other. As we move into the future, our geopolitical role may be broken down into many groups. As we can tackle the burden alone, we must join forces, and increase our geopolitical role. As we administer ...
    Related: geopolitical, world wide, birth control, world countries, management
  • A Global War Or An Intercontinental Nuclear Exchange Is Highly Unlikely In The Current World Political Climate But As Long As - 1,605 words
    A global war or an intercontinental nuclear exchange is highly unlikely in the current world political climate. But as long as considerable nuclear weapons and long range delivery systems exist in other countries and a developing threat resides with potential adversaries, the possibility of an aerospace attack on North America cannot be discounted. Furthermore, the proliferation of cruise and ballistic missiles, and weapons of mass destruction, has made the post-Cold War world more, rather than less, dangerous. New generations of these weapons may be in the hands of governments or organizations which could threaten the North American continent, or American and Canadian military personnel dep ...
    Related: climate, intercontinental, nuclear, nuclear weapons, political climate
  • As Twentyfirst Century Draws Near, There Appears To Be In The World An Era Of Unprecedented Peace Contrary To The Predictions - 2,243 words
    As twenty-first century draws near, there appears to be in the world an era of unprecedented peace. Contrary to the predictions that the end of the Cold War will bring about the fragmentation of international order and the emergence of multipolar rivalry among atomistic national units, today the worlds major powers enjoy co-operative relations and world economy is progressively liberalising and integrating. The peace and prosperity of the current era, however are sustained by the constant operation of a single factor: American relative power capability (Kupchan, 1998, p. 40). In this paper, a clear foreign policy strategy for the United States of America in Europe and Eurasia will be outline ...
    Related: contrary, first century, regions of the world, twenty-first century, world economy, world view
  • Canadian National Unity - 1,822 words
    Canadian National Unity Canadian National Unity has been a serious debate to all Canadians for close to three decades now. Starting with French President Charles DeGaulle, who in visiting Quebec told a large crowd in Motreal, Vivre le Quebec libre! or, Live in a free Quebec. This one event started the whole modern separtist movement in Canada, and brought us to where we are now. They went from one person with an idea then, to 2 provincial parties, and a federal one as well, now. This is a very serious issue, that could end up in the destuction of an amazing country. Its not like theyre bluffing, weve had two Referendums on this issue (one almost resulting in a Yes vote), and numerous Constit ...
    Related: canadian, canadian dollar, national assembly, unity, social problems
  • Geopolitics - 1,565 words
    Geopolitics Geopolitics is the applied study of the relationships of geographical space to politics. Geopolitics, therefore, concerned with the reciprocal impact of spatial patterns, features, and structures and political ideas, institutions, and transactions. The term 'Geopolitics' has originally invented, in 1899, by a Swedish political scientist, Rudolf Kjellen and its original meaning is to signify a general concern with geography and politics. However, defining the concept of 'geopolitics' itself is a considerably difficult task because definition of geopolitics tends to changes as historical periods of time and structures of world order change. Therefore, there have been numerous ways ...
    Related: geopolitics, military officer, soviet union, domino theory, american
  • Geopolitics - 1,575 words
    ... barrel infected by one rotten one, the corruption of Greece would infect Iran and all to the east. It would also carry infection to Africa through Asia Minor and Egypt, and to Europe through Italy, France, already threatened by the strongest domestic Communist parties in Western Europe (Acheson, 1969). Presenting "apples in a barrel" is a mark of excessive pride in the American intellectuals of statecraft with the Truman administration. Thus when Truman declares in his speech that it is "necessary only to glance at a map," the map he has in his mind is one where states are equivalent to dominoes about to fall. Only physical proximity is seen as geography and nothing else. The geopolitica ...
    Related: geopolitics, third world, soviet military, military technology, rapid
  • Kurdistan - 1,185 words
    Kurdistan Since the end of World War I, Kurdistan has been administered by five sovereign states, with the largest portions of the land being respectively in Turkey (43%), Iran (31%), Iraq (18%), Syria (6%) and the former Soviet Union (2%). The PKK's origins can be traced back to 1974, when calan, in Ankara, led a small group of radicals out of Revolutionary Youth (DEV-GENЗ). The Kurdistan Workers Party, "Partiya Karkeren Kurdistan" (PKK) was established in 1978. Цcalan, the leader of the organization took refuge in Syria, after 1980, following the efficient struggle against such organizations by the Turkish Security Forces. In the annual report of the U.S. State Department publi ...
    Related: kurdistan, cold war, south asian, small group, external
  • Lenin And Stalin Ideology - 4,157 words
    ... ... " Compare and contrast the ideologies and the political and economic practice of Lenin and Stalin. Every state is based upon and driven by some ideology. Imperial Russia was based upon autocratic absolutism for over 400 years. Following the Bolshevik seizure of power in 1917, a new era dawned upon Russia. For the next 36 years she would be in the hands of two men that would attempt to apply a new, vastly different creed in ruling and transforming this country. Vladimir Ilich Lenin, as the leader of the Bolshevik party, ruled Russia from October 1917 till his death in January 1924. He was succeeded by Joseph Vissarionovich Stalin, who also ruled until his death in March 1953. Both men ...
    Related: ideology, lenin, stalin, orthodox church, main argument
  • Machiavelli - 3,021 words
    ... eferring to the notorious but often also highly misunderstood cynical character of Machiavelli's analysis, I want to concentrate in the means, not in the legitimacy of the polities, or in the question of whether their goal is genesis, restoration, defence, or destruction of a polity's existence and liberty. The means, namely, ultimately reveal many relevant features of a polity's character: whether its power is built upon legitimacy and liberty, or upon coercion and terror. Those admirers of Machiavelli, who read his works in a selective way, or out of their historical context, tend to overemphasise the cynical character in the thinking of Machiavelli, who wanted to appear a worthy advis ...
    Related: machiavelli, roman empire, christian nation, middle east, contrary
  • Manhattan Project - 1,922 words
    Manhattan Project Manhattan Project In the early morning hours of July 16, 1945, the first ever nuclear explosion took place in Alamogordo, New Mexico. The explosion was the first test of the most destructive weapon ever known to man, and was the result of almost six years of research and development by some of the world's top scientists. This endeavor was known as the Manhattan Project. Less than a month after the test, which was known as Trinity, the United States dropped two nuclear bombs on Japan, three days apart, which forced the Japanese to surrender. The story of the Manhattan Project is an abysmal subject, as is the effect of the Manhattan Project on international politics, and both ...
    Related: manhattan, manhattan project, military power, harcourt brace, describing
  • Mary Reynolds - 1,308 words
    Mary Reynolds April 24, 2000 Dr. Boitano U.S. Foreign Policy The Rise of the Superpower Russia and the United States grew to become the main superpowers in the arena of international relations during a specific time in history. The emergence of these two countries as superpowers can be traced back to World War II. In order to be a superpower, a nation needs to have a strong economy, an overpowering military, immense political power, and a strong national ideology (Aga-Rossi 65). It was World War II, and its results that caused each of these countries to experience such a plurality of power (Ovyany 97). Before the war, both nations were fit to be described as great powers, but it would be inc ...
    Related: mary, reynolds, third world, axis powers, ensuring
  • Modernity Transforming Progression Of Human Life - 643 words
    Modernity - Transforming Progression Of Human Life Modernity: A transforming progression of human life Mankind is always transforming, moving progressively in a direction that modernizes the very fabric of being, ultimately impacting the socioreligious, cultural, economic and geopolitical aspects. Modernity, as a whole, is a reactive force--a reaction of comparisons and contractions to that which existed before. Some institutions and values of society are carried through modernalistic changes, often those notions thought to be progressive and valuable to the new transitional society. Resistance to modernity is evident, but inevitably any resistance will end in failure. Modernity, as defined ...
    Related: human life, modernity, progression, transforming, modern science
  • Outsiders Looking In - 1,010 words
    Outsiders Looking In In the United States something very odd happened during the period of time from the middle of the 1950's up to the impact of the crisis of the 1960's. For once in the storied history of the United States a majority of Americans accepted the same system of assumptions. This shared system of assumptions is known as the liberal consensus. The main reason there was such a thing as liberal consensus was because of the extreme economic growth we experienced in the U.S. during the post World War II era. However, the consensus didn't apply to one important group of people. These were the combat soldiers it the Vietnam War. Their experiences at home and abroad suggest that they w ...
    Related: outsiders, labor unions, attend college, foreign policy, american
  • Sinorussian Forum - 4,804 words
    ... mmodities even like some African countries. Therefore, the production, trade and commodity inspection units, to some degree, acquiesce in the overflow of counterfeit goods. Fourthly, after so many years of foreign goods pouring into the Russian market, Russians are accustomed to high-quality commodities. More important, the renaissance of Russias economics, the rapid growth of Chinas economy, and the allied strategic interests really remind us of the complementary need between each other. The guarantee of the retirement pay and the increase of the salary could help improve the purchasing power and arise higher claims of Chinese commodities. 1.2 Many Chinese tourists almost send all their ...
    Related: forum, high price, tax evasion, various types, emerge
  • Taiwanese Development Model - 653 words
    Taiwanese Development Model According to Thomas Gold Taiwan offers a text book case of an elite-led revolution leading to social transformation. The stability of hard authoritarianism of the Taiwanese government laid the groundwork for Taiwanese development. The KMT's cohesiveness and political domination plus the economic development aid supplied by the United States also helped to provide good conditions for Taiwanese growth in the beginning. Once the KMT gained control of Taiwan they redistributed the land and launched a program of rehabilitation and industrialization. This period was responsible for the nationalization of many businesses formerly owned by the Japanese and the start of in ...
    Related: development model, economic development, taiwanese, authoritarian government, pacific rim
  • Tom Clancy - 1,621 words
    ... ). In addition to writing multiple best sellers, a number of Clancy's books have been adapted into movies and television series. Clancy also created his own company called Red Entertainment, which markets software games and other multimedia developments. These are all based on books or ideas by Tom Clancy. Ten years ago, the world was a very different place and it's changed--in historical terms--virtually overnight (Cohen 114), said Clancy when asked to comment on why the expansion into software development. It is estimated that Clancy earned 16 million dollars in 1996, and 34 million dollars in 1997(Schindehette 2). Clancy has also become involved in the education of the military. He ha ...
    Related: clancy, tom clancy, white house, summer camp, logical
  • Turkey And The European Union A Unique Case In The Process Of Enlargement - 1,349 words
    Turkey And The European Union - A Unique Case In The Process Of Enlargement The European Union, formerly known as the European Community until the Treaty of Maastricht in 1992, has undergone massive changes since its inception. The European Community was an institution primarily designed to achieve Franco-German reconciliation, but has since grown to become a powerful economic and political bloc worldwide, with a diverse range of member states and objectives. The project of the European Community changed dramatically after the demise of the USSR, with the establishment of policy favouring the accession of the Central and Eastern European States. Fundamentally, for accession to the EU, this n ...
    Related: customs union, eastern european, enlargement, european community, european union, turkey
  • Wwii Rise Of The Superpowers - 2,058 words
    WWII - Rise of the Superpowers Rise of the Superpowers (USA & USSR) from events prior to and during WWII World War II: the process of superpowerdom It is often wondered how the superpowers achieved their position of dominance. It seems that the maturing of the two superpowers, Russia and the United States, can be traced to World War II. To be a superpower, a nation needs to have a strong economy, an overpowering military, immense international political power and, related to this, a strong national ideology. It was this war, and its results, that caused each of these superpowers to experience such a preponderance of power. Before the war, both nations were fit to be described as great powers ...
    Related: wwii, axis powers, historical background, continental europe, super
  • Wwii Rise Of The Superpowers - 1,968 words
    ... ould be definite spheres of influence, as long as it was clear that the Soviet Union was not to interfere with the governments of the affected nations. The reason that Roosevelt did not object to a large portion of Eastern Europe coming under the totalitarian control of the Soviet Union was that he believed the weakness in the Soviet economy caused by the war would require Stalin to seek Western aid, and open the Russians to Western influence. Many historians feel that Roosevelt was simply naive to believe that the Soviet Union would act in such a way. Arthur Schlesinger saw the geopolitical and ideological differences between the United States and the Soviet Union. He stressed however, ...
    Related: wwii, military-industrial complex, cold war, central europe, communism
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