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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: genital mutilation

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  • Female Genital Mutilation - 1,231 words
    Female Genital Mutilation Female genital mutilation (FGM) is referred to as the removal of part, or all, of the female genitalia. The most severe form is infibulation, otherwise known as pharaonic circumcision. It is estimated that 15% of all FGMs performed in Africa are infibulations. The procedure consists of clitoridectomy (all, or part of, the clitoris is removed), excision (removing all, or part of, the labia minora), and cutting of the labia majora to make raw surfaces, which are stitched together to form a cover over the vagina as they heal. A small hole is left to allow urine and menstrual blood to get out. The majority (85%) of genital mutilations performed in Africa involve a clito ...
    Related: female genital mutilation, genital, genital mutilation, mutilation, gender identity
  • Female Genital Mutilation - 1,588 words
    Female Genital Mutilation Female Genital Mutilation The practice of female genital mutilation, also known as female circumcision, occurs throughout the world, but it is most common in Africa. Female genital mutilation is a tradition and social custom to keep a young girl pure and a married woman faithful. In Africa it is practiced in the majority of the continent including Kenya, Nigeria, Mali, Upper Volta, Ivory Coast, Egypt, Mozambique and Sudan. It is a cross-cultural and cross-religious ritual, which is performed by Muslims, Coptic Christians, Protestants, Catholics and members of various indigenous groups. Female genital mutilation is usually performed on girls before they reach puberty ...
    Related: female circumcision, female genital mutilation, genital, genital mutilation, mutilation
  • Torture, Not Culture Female Genital Mutilation - 1,181 words
    Torture, Not Culture - Female Genital Mutilation annon (AN INSIGHT INTO FEMALE GENITAL MUTILATION) Female circumcision, better known as Female Genital Mutilation, is an ugly monster finally rearing its head from out of the depths of time. It can attack a girl at any age, with a little prompting from her society, and the aid of an unsuspecting human wielding the knife. Usually, it is performed from a few days after birth to puberty, but in some regions, the torture can be put off until just before marriage or the seventh month of pregnancy (Samad, 52). Women that have gone beyond the primary level of education are much less likely to fall victim to the tradition ('Men's...', 34). The average ...
    Related: female circumcision, female genital mutilation, genital, genital mutilation, mutilation
  • A Rite Of Passage - 863 words
    A Rite of Passage An Evaluation If you read the paper, peruse People magazine, or spend any time watching the tabloid TV shows, you would have the strong impression that what Lorena Bobbitt did to her husband, John Wayne Bobbitt, in the wee hours of June 23 in Manassas, Virginia, was the equivalent of the shot heard round the world. You might think that Lorena Bobbitt single-handedly avenged the sexual crimes that have been perpetrated against all women from the beginning of time. There is no denying the primal, gut-wrenching reaction to John Wayne Bobbitts wound. It is an unheard of crime, too horrible for men to contemplate, fascinating and appalling to women. It is understandably a major ...
    Related: rite, genital mutilation, john wayne, health organization, unbearable
  • Drugs Debate - 1,438 words
    ... less likely to fulfill their familial and social obligations . Mill said that "if he refrains from molesting others in what concerns them he should be allowed, without molestation, to carry his opinions into practice at his own cost." Evidently, he, the user, is not "refraining from molesting others in what concerns them" in most cases. Furthermore, mind constricting drugs in themselves victimize users and therefore should not be legal. A relativist view is that drugs are part of our culture and therefore, drug use should not be prohibited. Genital mutilation is part of some African cultures and as people are becoming more aware of this practice, people are fighting against it. Female ge ...
    Related: debate, drug control, drugs, young children, decision maker
  • Female Genital Mutation - 1,154 words
    Female Genital Mutation Struggling against genital mutilation in Sudan In the country of Sudan, in Northern Africa, there is a procedure that is tradition and is performed on most women called female genital mutilation, or FGM, which used to be known as female circumcision. It has been a normal practice for generations, but is now the subject for international controversy on the morality and safety of this procedure. It is now known that 82 percent of Sudanese woman have an extreme form of genital mutilation done on them, normally at a young age. This form of mutilation is called the Pharaonic form and includes the total removal of the clitoris and labia, and stitching together of the vulva, ...
    Related: female circumcision, female genital mutilation, female sexuality, genital, genital mutilation, mutation
  • Female Gential Mutalition - 1,150 words
    Female Gential Mutalition Female Genitalia Mutilation Picture this, a young innocent girl, between the age of eight and twelve, running around, playing, and having a good time. Then she is snatched away to a foul hut, whose floor is nothing but dirt. Once in the hut, the helpless girl is stripped of all her clothing and pinned to the dirt floor. Her tiny legs are spread and held wide apart with a tight grasp. Soon afterward, a midwife, with no education in human anatomy or medicine, enters the hut and says a prayer. While the young girl is held down in this most vulnerable position the midwife takes a handful of sand and rubs it all over the girls genitals (Walker 106). With no anesthetics a ...
    Related: female circumcision, female genital mutilation, young girl, good time, edge
  • Female Gential Mutalition - 1,080 words
    ... ions, many girls will develop pelvic inflammatory disease. Some of the infections are due to urine and menstrual retention. Directly following the excision, the girl will almost always have urine retention. This is due to the swelling of the tissues, which causes severe pain during urination. When the girl holds her urine in like this, it can cause urinary tract infections. In addition to retaining urine, she might also retain menstrual blood. The opening that is left behind is at times too small for the blood to escape; thus there is a retention of menstrual blood (Rushwan). After experiencing this operation, many girls find that menstruating alone is intensely torturous. Indeed, some m ...
    Related: female genital mutilation, the girl, african countries, major problem, disorganization
  • Human Rights - 1,393 words
    Human Rights On December tenth 1948 in the Palis de Chaillot in Paris, the United Nation's General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The document is made up of thirty articles which deal with a series of basic human rights and duties. It follows the premise that " the declaration is a common standard of achievement for all peoples and nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both amon ...
    Related: cultural rights, human beings, human rights, individual rights, legal rights, universal declaration of human rights
  • Human Rights - 1,393 words
    Human Rights On December tenth 1948 in the Palis de Chaillot in Paris, the United Nation's General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The document is made up of thirty articles which deal with a series of basic human rights and duties. It follows the premise that " the declaration is a common standard of achievement for all peoples and nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both amon ...
    Related: cultural rights, human beings, human rights, individual rights, legal rights, universal declaration of human rights
  • Human Rights - 1,393 words
    Human Rights On December tenth 1948 in the Palis de Chaillot in Paris, the United Nation's General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The document is made up of thirty articles which deal with a series of basic human rights and duties. It follows the premise that " the declaration is a common standard of achievement for all peoples and nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both amon ...
    Related: cultural rights, human beings, human rights, individual rights, legal rights, universal declaration of human rights
  • Human Rights - 1,393 words
    Human Rights On December tenth 1948 in the Palis de Chaillot in Paris, the United Nation's General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The document is made up of thirty articles which deal with a series of basic human rights and duties. It follows the premise that " the declaration is a common standard of achievement for all peoples and nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both amon ...
    Related: cultural rights, human beings, human rights, individual rights, legal rights, universal declaration of human rights
  • Religions - 2,317 words
    ... s (perfect teachers) who guide the faithful from their locations in Paradise.There are over 70 other groups which originated within Islam and broke away from the Sunni and Shi'ite faith communities: Sufism: a mystic tradition in which followers seek inner knowledge directly from God through meditation and ritual and dancing. They developed in the 7th century CE as an ascetic reaction to the formalism and laws of the Qur'an. Baha'i World Faith: This is an attempt to integrate all of the world religions. It was originally a break-away sect from Islam but has since grown to become a separate religion. Ahmadis: Followers of the Ahmadiyya Movement believe that God sent Ahmad as a Messiah, a m ...
    Related: world religions, promised land, sri lanka, hebrew scriptures, degenerate
  • Torture Is One Of The Most Barbaric Acts Of State Repression, And It Constitutes A Direct And Deliberate Attack On The Core O - 1,256 words
    Torture is one of the most barbaric acts of state repression, and it constitutes a direct and deliberate attack on the core of the human personality. Like slavery, it is an expression of the almost unlimited power of one individual over another. In the case of slavery, the human being is degraded to the condition of a non-human object deprived of legal personality. Torture aims to destroy human dignity and reduce the victim to the status of a passive tool in the hands of the torturer. In ancient and medieval times in Europe, torture was employed to aggravate criminal punishments, usually the death penalty, and to extort confessions. Its use was an officially accepted and legally regulated as ...
    Related: core, deliberate, torture, mental health, enforcement officers
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