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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: genetically

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  • Genetically Altered Food - 1,683 words
    Genetically Altered Food Genetic modification of organisms in general is a biotechnological process that forces genes to behave according to certain characteristics. Changing characteristics of organisms is based on changing their DNA (tech deoxyribonucleic acid; the acid which carries genetic information in a cell). It is being used for modifying genes in plants, animals or micro-organisms. It is being also used especially with food in order to improve the nutritious quality, make less use of chemicals such as pesticides, which proved to be extremely harmful, and sometimes to add flavour. Genetically modified food (GMF) is considered one of the modern production improvements and the largest ...
    Related: engineered food, food production, genetically, genetically modified, world population
  • Genetically Engineered Foods - 1,019 words
    Genetically Engineered Foods Introduction The use of genetically engineering in agriculture and food production has an impact, not only on the environment and biodiversity, but also on human health. Therefore, thorough biosafety assessment requires, not only an evaluation of environmental impacts of genetically engineered organisms, but also an assessment of the risks that genetically engineered food pose for the health of consumers. Let us take deeper look at some of the aspects related to genetically engineered foods. What is Genetic Engineering? Genetic engineering is a laboratory technique used by scientists to change the DNA of living organisms. DNA is the blueprint for the individualit ...
    Related: engineered food, food additives, food production, genetically, genetically engineered food
  • Genetically Engineered Foods - 1,002 words
    ... r irritants and could act at the biochemical, cellular, tissue or organ levels to disrupt a range of physiological functions. An example of a class of genetically engineered foods that are of particular concern are those that have been modified to produce biological control agents such as the family of insecticidal Bt enterotoxins. The Bt toxin, which has been used topically in organic farming, has powerful biological activity. If consumed in larger amounts it can become a toxin. Plants genetically-manipulated to produce Bt toxin produce at least 1000 times more Bt toxin per acre than does a heavy application of Bt directly on plants. There was another case where one company genetically ...
    Related: engineered food, genetically, genetically engineered food, genetically modified, genetic engineering
  • Genetically Modified Corn - 631 words
    Genetically Modified Corn Since Kraft Foods recently had to recall taco shells made from corn that was approved for human consumption, Arnold Weigand didn't know whether or not he should avoid growing any genetically modified corn. A study was conducted to examine whether or not growing genetically modified corn was a sound economical decision for Arnold Weigand. The problems with gentically modified corn, the dangerous chemicals in genetically modified corn, and the testing that has been done on genetically modified corn was reviewed. We also determined whether the corn would be successful in the market. To determine whether or not the corn would be successful in the market, we reviewed the ...
    Related: corn, genetically, genetically modified, modified, north american
  • Genetically Modified Organisms In Our Food - 1,375 words
    Genetically Modified Organisms In Our Food Tomatoes, soy beans and McDonalds French fries- what all of these things have in common? They are all some of the most commonly genetically modified foods on the market today. With scientists in the race to invent newer and better everythings, genetically modified organisms, or GMOs have become a hot topic of research in just the past 10 years. By using the genetic information from one organism, or the DNA and splicing it with the DNA of another, scientists can make food crops grow bigger, stay fresh longer, or even create their own pesticides. In this case however, and often with any case involving genetic modification, the technology has exceeded ...
    Related: genetically, genetically modified, modified, modified organisms, organisms
  • Opposing Genetically Modified Organisms - 485 words
    Opposing Genetically Modified Organisms As a result of biotechnology and its wake of controversy that follows, a number or organizations have voiced their concerns toward the corporate driven discipline. As a product of biotechnologies carelessness, or motives, activist groups have risen throughout the world opposing the novelty of genetically modified organisms. The intent of biotech companies is to market and eventually sell these innovations, eventually increasing their profits and stock prices so new products can be funded while the shareholders line their pockets. Opposing organizations which see biotechnologies incentives as a danger to society and the many other life forms that exist ...
    Related: genetically, genetically modified, modified, modified organisms, opposing, organisms
  • Psychosocial Development Erikson, 1902194, Concluded That A Humans Development Is Determined Genetically And That In Order To - 1,640 words
    Psychosocial Development Erikson, (1902-194), concluded that a humans development is determined genetically and that in order to move through each stage of development than they must be biologically, socially and psychologically ready. Erikson believed that the childs genes resembled a timetable and it is this genetic timetable that determines the childs stages of development. Erikson extended this principle to social and psychological growth; it is human nature to pass through a predetermined sequence of psychosocial stages which are genetically determined. Gross, (R), The Science of Mind and Behaviour. (1996) The Psychosocial Stages Erikson concluded that every personality has a certain am ...
    Related: genetically, human existence, human nature, physical development, psychosocial, psychosocial development
  • Should We Genetically Engineer Ourselves - 706 words
    Should We Genetically Engineer Ourselves? SHOULD WE GENETICALLY ENGINEER OURSELVES? Should we use new genetic information to alter our own DNA to make ourselves more adept? Last winter, scientist made a major break through in genetic engineering. They finished a complete map of DNA of a complex organism. Although the animal that they broke down is a simple flat worm, over 40% of its DNA sequence match our own. This is an astounding leap forward for genetic engineers. Genetic engineering is the use of lasers and/or chemicals to alter the sequences of nucleotides, which are the bases of DNA. Many people throughout the world greatly oppose genetic engineering. Calling it unethical, anti-Christi ...
    Related: engineer, genetically, leap forward, genetic information, faster
  • The Role Of Transport Proteins In Eukaryotic Organisms And Their Potential Exploitation In Genetically Modified Plants - 1,228 words
    The role of transport proteins in eukaryotic organisms and their potential exploitation in genetically modified plants There are three major types of membrane transport proteins (Lodish, et. al, 1995). ATP-powered pumps derive the energy required for energetically unfavorable transport of ions or molecules via the hydrolysis of ATP. Channel proteins engage in passive transport, moving particular ions, or water down their respective concentration gradients. Transporters use the slowest mechanism for transport binding only one or a few substrate molecules for transport at a time. All three of these types of molecules contribute to the amazing selectivity of plasma membranes and are, thus, crit ...
    Related: eukaryotic, exploitation, genetically, genetically modified, modified, organisms, plant species
  • Abortion Prohibition - 1,317 words
    Abortion Prohibition One of the most ethical controversial issues been debated now in United States is whether late- term abortion should be banned or not. Most people argued that it is proper to ban late-term abortion. They believe that it is un-ethical and a murder of an unborn child not a right of freedom of choice. It is an immoral act and violates the social and religious norms. On the other hand some people argued that late-term abortion should not be banned because it is necessary to terminate a fetus when the life of the woman is in danger as a result of complicated pregnancy; or when pregnancy result from incest or rape and the woman may be late in finding out that she is pregnant. ...
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  • Abortion Prolife View - 1,104 words
    ... oved by God who has a distinct plan for their lives. It denies the child the right to live and society the privilege of the childs gift and contributions to the world. "God hears the new life in the womb, the heart within the heart, the anguish cry of hostage child sobbing in the dark." Many times after having an abortion, a woman will become emotionally unstable. Post-abortion syndrome describes the trauma of the woman who finally feels guilty, understands the repercussions of her actions, and regrets her previous decision. Statistics show that 92% feel less in touch with their emotions or feel a need to suppress their emotions. 82% had greater feelings of loneliness or isolation and 86 ...
    Related: abortion, human nature, moral responsibility, senate judiciary committee, rage
  • Abortion Prolife View - 1,093 words
    ... the right to live and society the privilege of the childs gift and contributions to the world. God hears the new life in the womb, the heart within the heart, the anguish cry of hostage child sobbing in the dark. Many times after having an abortion, a woman will become emotionally unstable. Post-abortion syndrome describes the trauma of the woman who finally feels guilty, understands the repercussions of her actions, and regrets her previous decision. Statistics show that 92% feel less in touch with their emotions or feel a need to suppress their emotions. 82% had greater feelings of loneliness or isolation and 86% had increased tendency toward anger or rage. 53% increased or began use ...
    Related: abortion, online available, united states senate, pro-life movement, minute
  • Add - 1,362 words
    Add Attention Deficit Disorder For centuries children have been grounded, beaten, or even killed for ignoring the rules or not listening to what they're told. In the past it was thought these "bad" kids were the products of bad parenting, bad environment, or simply being stubborn, however it is now known that many of these children may have had Attention Deficit Disorder, or A. D. D., and could've been helped. A. D. D. is a syndrome that affects millions of children and adults in the United States and is a very frustrating and confusing syndrome that often goes undiagnosed. While there is no clear-cut definition of A. D. D., it's known that it's a genetic disorder that affects males more oft ...
    Related: manic depression, negative aspects, prison population, instantly
  • Aggressive Behavior - 1,312 words
    Aggressive Behavior Aggression is a behavioral characteristic that refers to forceful actions or procedures (such a deliberate attack) with intentions to dominate or master. It tends to be hostile, injurious, or destructive, and is often motivated by frustration (The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, 1995). For an individual, aggressive behavior is considered understandable and normal under appropriate circumstances, but when it is frequent, intense, lasting, and pervasive, it is more likely to be a symptom of a mental disorder. Likewise, aggression between groups, can be in the form of healthy competition, but can become harmful when unfair or unjust disadvantage or frustration is perceived, lead ...
    Related: abnormal behavior, aggressive, aggressive behavior, behavioral therapy, social norms
  • Agression - 2,144 words
    Agression Aggression Aggression is a critical part of animal existence, which is an inherent driving force to humans, as we, too, are animals. The source of aggression within humans is a long summative list, but before trying to understand its source one must apply a working definition of aggression. Aggressive behavior is defined by Encyclopedia Britannica as any action of an animal that serves to injure an opponent or prey animal or to cause an opponent to retreat. (7) David G. Myers states that aggression is any physical or verbal behavior intended to hurt or destroy.(9) There are many types of aggressive behaviors, which can be differentiated from the factual act to the hidden motives. F ...
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  • Aids Test On Animal - 1,191 words
    Aids Test On Animal Aids Testing on Animals Between 25 and 50 million animals are killed in American laboratories each year, this include mice, rats, cats, ferrets, monkey, and etc.(American Anti-Vivisection Society) Since the medical skill has been developed, numbers of drugs have been invented to fight the diseases that human beings get. In order to make sure that those medicine works, the medicines need to be tested on animals first. When a new disease is found, thousands of animals are put in the laboratory to test on the new medicine. And during the past decade, the new disease, Aids, is found. Is it time again for millions of animals to sacrifice their lives and have no right for their ...
    Related: aids, animal experimentation, animal rights, veterinary medicine, university school
  • Aids Whats New - 1,666 words
    ... dical history-taking, questionnaires and donor inter- views. Very few people at risk of AIDS now come to give blood. The "self- elimination form", filled out in a private booth, allows any who feel compelled by peer pressure to donate blood, total privacy to check the box that says "Do not use my blood for transfusion." As to banking one's own blood, or autologous donations, the Red Cross permits a few "medically suitable" people, referred by their physician, to store their blood if they are likely to need blood transfusion in upcoming elective surgery. They can bank up to four units of blood, taken in the five weeks before surgery. Finally - it can be categorically stated - IT IS ABSOLU ...
    Related: aids, whats, influenza virus, research institute, awareness
  • Aids Whats New - 1,690 words
    ... tory-taking, questionnaires and donor interviews. Very few people at risk of AIDS now come to give blood. The "self-elimination form", filled out in a private booth, allows any who feel compelled by peer pressure to donate blood, total privacy to check the box that says "Do not use my blood for transfusion." As to banking one's own blood, or autologous donations, the Red Cross permits a few "medically suitable" people, referred by their physician, to store their blood if they are likely to need blood transfusion in upcoming elective surgery. They can bank up to four units of blood, taken in the five weeks before surgery. Finally - it can be categorically stated - IT IS ABSOLUTELY IMPOSSI ...
    Related: aids, whats, public health, johns hopkins, communicate
  • Aids Whats New Is The Message Getting Through We Already Know Enough About Aids To Prevent Its Spread, But Ignorance, Complac - 1,708 words
    AIDS - What's new ? ------------------- Is the message getting through? We already know enough about AIDS to prevent its spread, but ignorance, complacency, fear and bigotry continue to stop many from taking adequate precautions. We know enough about how the infection is transmitted to protect ourselves from it without resorting to such extremes as mandatory testing, enforced quarantine or total celibacy. But too few people are heeding the AIDS message. Perhaps many simply don't like or want to believe what they hear, preferring to think that AIDS "can't happen to them." Experts repeatedly remind us that infective agents do not discriminate, but can infect any and everyone. Like other commun ...
    Related: aids, whats, human cells, blood cells, usual
  • Alcoholism - 2,013 words
    ... times increased consumption of alcohol are cited in evidence. But these data invariably fail to take account of changes in availability or use of facilities, changes in admission or diagnostic policies, or changes in the source of beverages--for example, from unrecorded to recorded supplies. In the Soviet Union a change in the internal political situation with the death of Stalin resulted in a shift from official denial that any significant problem of alcoholism existed to an outcry that its prevalence was widespread and serious, though no statistics were provided. Treatment of alcoholism The various treatments of alcoholism may be classified as physiological, psychological, and social. ...
    Related: alcoholism, carbon dioxide, psychoactive drugs, alcoholics anonymous aa, therapy
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