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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: genetic screening

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  • Genetic Screening - 1,580 words
    Genetic Screening Genetic screening, also known as preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), is a newly emerging technology that has brought with it much controversy. PGD involves the in vitro fertilization of an embryo. The embryos are allowed to develop to a 6 to 10 cell stage, at which point one of the embryonic cells is removed from each embryo and the cellular DNA is analyzed for chromosomal abnormalities or genetic mutations (Botkin, 1998). In doing this, it can be determined which embryos will be most likely to implant and germinate successfully in the uterus. PGD is a complicated, technologically sophisticated process. It is a union of in vetro fertilization technology and molecular b ...
    Related: genetic, genetic screening, genetic testing, screening, colon cancer
  • Benifits Of Technology - 1,500 words
    ... ses, which can not be cured effectively, or those for which we have no medicines like A.I.D.S. They could even prove to have fewer side effects and more suitable for the way our body is built. We can even imagine a time when the word disease is long removed from the dictionary. Learning our genetic codes could help us determine the modes of attacks used by pathogens and viruses. Technology could prosper enough to wipe out deadly diseases such as malaria from humanity. Another possible use of this vast information can be marked out in Genetic Screening of pregnant mothers and their fetuses. Some people see red in this citing discrimination of the less fortunate individuals where though ge ...
    Related: science and technology, technology, side effects, growth hormone, utilitarianism
  • Breast Cancer - 1,598 words
    Breast Cancer Hereditary breast cancer is a disease caused by mutations on breast cancer suppresser genes (ACCV Pg.17). Mutations allow normal cells to divide abnormally (ACCV Pg.13). Resulting cells divide faster as they do not specialize and form useless lumps of cells called malignant tumours (ACCV Pg.13). Genetic Screening is the process where Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) fragments are analyzed for a specific gene. The purpose is to identify individuals carrying disease causing genes so they can change their life style and also help invent a cure (ACCV Pg.20). This is done by amplifying DNA withdrawn from an individual, then specific gene mutations are targeted using the Electrophoresis p ...
    Related: breast, breast cancer, cancer, fact sheet, clinical practice
  • Cloning Process - 1,220 words
    Cloning Process Cloning, the process of creating a copy of a plant or animal that is genetically identical to the original through asexual means, has sparked some interesting moral and ethical debate. For years, cloning has been used to produce a greater number of a specific type of plant, such as the Macintosh apple trees, which have all been derived from single mutated plant . Now, however, upon the discovery of a method to clone animals, even humans, people are beginning to become aware of the benefits and consequences of cloning, as well as the ethics involved. Cloning has had a fairly long history. In 1952, the first successful cloning experiment took place. Scientists Robert Briggs and ...
    Related: cloning, thomas king, washington post, good idea, unethical
  • Dna Profiling - 1,211 words
    ... the fundamental principle of the insurance business is "pooling uncertainty." The concept of adverse selection also causes insurers much dismay. Adverse selection refers to the probability that people privately aware of a medical problem are more likely to seek medical insurance. This negates the insurers policy of setting premiums with accordance to statistical information on the rates of illnesses and sicknesses in society. "The whole foundation of insurance is based on the fact that we and the insurance applicant are operating with equal levels of knowledge and ignorance." Without this level of ignorance, insurance companies will lose their social value as a means of spreading risk a ...
    Related: dna profiling, profiling, genetic screening, statistical information, adverse
  • Genetic - 882 words
    Genetic Engineering For many years, man has been advancing his race through technology. Many things through those were questionable and questionable, but none are close to a certain technology today. And that would be genetic engineering. What exactly is genetic engineering? To put it shortly, it is where scientists splice, alter, and manipulate genes of one thing to how the scientist want it, and even insert that gene into a foreign host. This technological tool is too powerful for us to handle. It is advancing faster than we can expect. Because of this fact, genetic engineering raises many moral and ethical issues while also showing signs of many dangers. This controversially technology co ...
    Related: genetic, genetic engineering, genetic screening, potential problems, point of view
  • Genetic Engineering - 1,849 words
    Genetic Engineering What's Genetic Engineering? Nowadays, scientists have learned a great deal about the chemical changes taking place inside living things. They have deciphered the code, DNA, by which animals and plants pass on their characteristics to their offspring. They have even leant how to alter that code to produce life forms with new characteristics. This new technology involving both chemical and biological science is known as genetic engineering. Through this new technology, we shall soon be able to provide much better treatments, and possibly even cures for certain serious diseases, especially those like inheriting diseases, which cannot presently be cured. Besides, we shall be ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic disease, genetic engineering, genetic mutation, genetic screening
  • Genetic Engineering - 1,422 words
    Genetic Engineering Gena Fawley Ethics Doug McKay 1 June, 2000 Genetic Engineering As we begin the twenty first century, many new technological advancements make themselves readily available to us. One such technological advancement is genetic engineering. Genetic engineering is the altering of human genes in order to perfect these genes, or change them completely. This new technology is very controversial, because it deals with things such as altering our own mortality and perhaps creating the perfect human race. Some people however, feel that gene altering is a wonderful new prospect because it may allow us to prevent certain disease, and thus increase our life spans. Also, those that are ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic disease, genetic engineering, genetic screening
  • Genetic Engineering - 938 words
    Genetic Engineering A girl is born without Tay-Sachs disease, a devasting genetic disorder that has decimated a lot of babies worldwide. A leukemia patient has defective bone marrow replaced with healthy bone marrow that was cloned from tissue from her own cells. These futuristic scenarios are not part of the debate for genetic engineering but they should be. Many people are afraid that somebody will clone Hitler or some evil person, but that is far from the fact. Genetic engineering can be used to make many aspects of human life better, including saving lives. The rapid development of humanitys ability to control the gene will eventually lead to a promising future for the entire planet as a ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic disorder, genetic engineering, genetic screening
  • Genetic Engineering: The Frontier - 1,041 words
    Genetic Engineering: The Frontier Genetic Engineering: The Frontier Science is a still somewhat obscure creature that continues to evolve, radically changing the face of mankind perhaps faster than its creator. The magnificent world of science has witnessed many profound breakthroughs and advances in this past century, but none as noteworthy as genetic engineering. As a subset of the more general subject of biotechnology, genetic engineering is the process of altering genetic material by purposeful manipulation of DNA (Wallace 339). To some, this field illustrates malicious scientists playing God, while to others it is a treasure chest of knowledge that holds the key to solving problems such ...
    Related: frontier, genetic, genetic engineering, genetic screening, genetic testing
  • Geneticist Construction - 1,091 words
    ... the control and initiative of the team leader, and tend to be tightly coupled to the heath-care responsibilities of the group. In addition to carrying out research, the M.D. team members may also spend considerable time on medical care and clinical services. (12) As exciting as the field is, only those who truly dedicated should chose to become a geneticist. Geneticists often work long hours, researching their project. However, the working conditions are often laid back and casual due to their involvement with chemicals. The environment is usually comfortable and relaxing for best performance from the researchers and scientists. (Sailes) Pasteur, a world-renowned French chemist and biol ...
    Related: construction, side effects, harcourt brace, team leader, species
  • Genetics - 2,123 words
    Genetics Genetics: Issues of IVF, screening, pre-selection, genetic testing, cloning and the social implications. James Watson once said, We used to think that our fate was in our stars. Now we know that, in large measure, our fate is in our Genes (Jaroff 1998). On June 26th 2000, The Human Genome Project will unveil its rough draft mapping of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences within the human chromosomes (genetic code), to the public. The project has been ongoing since the late eighties, and is a huge international exercise, which has so far cost approximately 3 billion dollars. The final draft is expected to be complete by the year 2003 and the assumption is that it will have a mas ...
    Related: genetic code, genetic disease, genetic disorder, genetic screening, genetic testing, genetics
  • Genetics - 2,024 words
    ... gument in the Western societies is that parents who have large families want a mixture of sons and daughters, and most patients attending sex/gender selection clinics already have children of the same sex/gender and seek another of the opposite. Once a male child has been born, parents are less concerned about the sex/gender of any later siblings. Statham et al (1993) conducted a survey of British women and was asked in the early stages of pregnancy if they minded what the sex/gender of their baby would be. Fifty eight percent said no and among those who expressed a strong preference six percent wanted a boy and an equal percentage wanted a girl. There was also only a hint of male bias i ...
    Related: genetic disease, genetic engineering, genetic information, genetic screening, genetics, human genetics
  • Gentic Engineering - 410 words
    Gentic Engineering 1 http://www.denison.edu/~griffi rp/paper.htm Genetic diversity is precious and should not be touched, even with the overwhelming temptation to do so. The gathering of genetic knowledge does not guarantee wisdom in deciding about human diversity. (Suzuki, Genethics, 345-346) A generalization must, then, occur. Every decision involves human beings as the decision makers and these persons must live with the consequences. Also, most decisions involve choices between different outcomes and humans are likely to place different values on different outcomes. (Kieffer, Bioethics, 45) For human beings, the ethical drawbacks of genetic engineering overpower the benefits. 2 http://ww ...
    Related: engineering, genetic engineering, genetic screening, multiple sclerosis, undesirable
  • Gentic Engineering - 2,224 words
    GENTIC ENGINEERING Abstract This paper sets out to defend human genetic engineering with a new bioethical approach, post-humanism, combined with a radical democratic political framework. Arguments for the restriction of human genetic engineering, and specifically germ-line enhancement, are reviewed. Arguments are divided into those which are fundamental matters of faith, or "bio-Luddite" arguments, and those which can be addressed through public policy, or "gene-angst" arguments. The four bio-Luddite concerns addressed are: Medicine Makes People Sick; There are Sacred Limits of the Natural Order; Technologies Always Serve Ruling Interests; The Genome is Too Complicated to Engineer. I argue t ...
    Related: engineering, genetic engineering, authoritarian state, democratic state, diversification
  • Gentic Engineering - 2,250 words
    ... ilities; the difficulties lie not in the means of production, but in the relations of production, the social and political context in which the technology is deployed. A second, and far less Marxian observation, is that social domination has some biological determinants. Patriarchy is, in part, based on women's physical vulnerability, and their special role in reproduction. While industrialization, contraception and the liberal democratic state may have removed the bulk of patriarchy's weight, genetic technology offers to remove the rest. Similarly, while racism, ageism, heterosexism, and so on may be only 10% biological and 90% social construction, at least the biological factors can be ...
    Related: engineering, genetic engineering, animal research, medical research, tier
  • Human - 468 words
    Human Genome Project Human Genome Project, international scientific collaboration, the goal of which is to gain a basic understanding of the entire genetic content, or genome, of a human being (see Genetics; Heredity). This genetic information is found in each cell of the body, encoded in the chemical deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). The project is intended to identify all the genes in the nucleus of a human cell; to establish, by a process known as mapping, where those genes are located on the chromosomes in the nucleus; and to determine, by a process known as sequencing, the order of the DNA's chemical subunits encoding the genetic information. The ultimate goal of genomic mapping and sequenci ...
    Related: human genome, genetic information, deoxyribonucleic acid, preventive medicine, medicine
  • Morality And Ethics And Computers - 1,645 words
    Morality and Ethics and Computers There are many different sides to the discussion on moral and ethical uses of computers. In many situations, the morality of a particular use of a computer is up to the individual to decide. For this reason, absolute laws about ethical computer usage is almost, but not entirely, impossible to define. The introduction of computers into the workplace has introduced many questions as well: Should employers make sure the workplace is designed to minimize health risks such as back strain and carpal tunnel syndrome for people who work with computers? Can employers prohibit employees from sending personal memos by electronic mail to a friend at the other side of th ...
    Related: computer crime, computer ethics, computer program, computer security, computer viruses, computer world, computers
  • Neurofibromatosis Its Genetic Implications - 1,348 words
    Neurofibromatosis & Its Genetic Implications The National Institute of Health defines Neurofibromatoses as group genetic disorders that affects the development and growth of neural cell tissues. These disorders cause tumor growth in nerve tissues, skin changes, and in some cases bone deformities. Of the eight possible subtypes of Neurofibromatosis (NF) at least 85% are represented by NF Type 1, also known as von Recklinghausen or classic peripheral neurofibromatosis. It has a prevalence of about 1:4000 live births. An additional ten percent have NF Type 2, also known as acoustic or central neurofibromatosis and occurs in about 1:50,000 live births (Baskin 1). This paper will deal only with t ...
    Related: genetic, genetic counseling, genetic disorder, genetic information, genetic screening, genetic testing
  • To Clone Or Not Clone - 1,387 words
    To Clone Or Not Clone. To clone or not to clone Cloning humans has recently become a possibility that seems much more feasible in today's society than it was twenty years ago. It is a method that involves the production of a group of identical cells or organisms that all derive from a single individual (Grolier 220). It is not known when or how cloning humans really became a possibility, but it is known that there are two possible ways that we can clone humans. The first way involves splitting an embryo into several halves and creating many new individuals from that embryo. The second method of cloning a human involves taking cells from an already existing human being and cloning them, in tu ...
    Related: clone, environmental issues, mother nature, human cloning, frozen
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