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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: genetic disorder

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  • Add - 1,362 words
    Add Attention Deficit Disorder For centuries children have been grounded, beaten, or even killed for ignoring the rules or not listening to what they're told. In the past it was thought these "bad" kids were the products of bad parenting, bad environment, or simply being stubborn, however it is now known that many of these children may have had Attention Deficit Disorder, or A. D. D., and could've been helped. A. D. D. is a syndrome that affects millions of children and adults in the United States and is a very frustrating and confusing syndrome that often goes undiagnosed. While there is no clear-cut definition of A. D. D., it's known that it's a genetic disorder that affects males more oft ...
    Related: manic depression, negative aspects, prison population, instantly
  • Animal Experimentation - 1,936 words
    ... and adults. The only reason man is able to perform these vital operations is because dogs, who are the closest model to humans for this type of procedure at this time, were used for experimentation. By using the canines for experimentation, they have been able to perfect heart surgery in humans (Wil 65). Another benefit humans have had because of animal experimentation is the treatment of familial hypercholestolemia. It was discovered that Watanabe rabbits have a genetic disorder in which they have dangerously high cholesterol levels. A doctor found this problem on the rabbits' feet, which had yellow "pockets" full of liquid. He soon found out this disorder was similar to the ones in hu ...
    Related: animal experimentation, animal research, animal rights, animal testing, animal welfare, experimentation
  • Bioethics - 2,327 words
    Bioethics As our technology continues to advance, new breakthroughs in medicine are discovered. With these new developments serious ethical and moral questions arise. Advancements in genetic engineering, reproductive technologies, cloning, organ transplanting, and human experimentation are all causes of concern. The Human Genome Project, an incredible scientific undertaking determined to produce a map of the human DNA code, will tell us how each gene or group of genes function (Lemonick and Thompson 44). With this map, scientists and doctors will be able to figure out how genes can malfunction and cause deadly diseases. Of course, they will also know what each gene controls, and how to manip ...
    Related: heart disease, cosmetic surgery, genetic engineering, genetically, engineer
  • Chapter 10 Definitions - 556 words
    Chapter 10 Definitions autosome: any chromosome other than the sex chromosome base deletion: a mutation in which a nucleotide is lost from the DNA sequence base insertion: a mutation in which a nucleotide base is added to the DNA sequence carrier: an individual who is heterozygous for a recessive trait chromosome mapping: a method of determining the relative position of genes on a chromosome using information on crossover frequency crossing over: exchange of parts between two homologous chromosomes deletion: a mutation in which a chromosomal piece breaks off and is lost frame-shift mutation: a mutation in which a base deletion or insertion cause the genes message to be translated incorrectly ...
    Related: turner syndrome, sickle cell, cell disease, error, syndrome
  • Cystic Fibrosis - 1,101 words
    ... o a human. These were milestones in finding a cure or a preventive treatment. They were huge steps because it marked the first time that scientists were able to test new technology in people with the disease. Also in October of 93'12 scientists at the University of Iowa made another big step, they determined that the CF gene treatment worked! It had repaired the defective CF cells. This too was the first time that the basic defect was corrected in people with the disease. Doctors and scientists know that the gene number 7 is the gene that CF is found upon. They also know that gene's protein product most likely induces the movement of chloride directly or indirectly. They named the protei ...
    Related: cystic, cystic fibrosis, fibrosis, lung cancer, general information
  • Disorders - 1,235 words
    ... to aid in normal development and rehabilitation. Limb deformities and repeated fractures can be corrected by intramedullary rods -- telescoping rods that elongate with growth. After surgical placement of the rods, extensive post- operative care is required because greater amounts of blood and fluid are lost. (Loeb, 755) It should be noted that the healing of fractures appear to be normal. (Isselbacher, 2112) Braces, immobilizing devices and wheelchairs are necessary. Physical therapy is important in the treatment of OI. Bone fracture density in unfractured bone is decreased when compared with age-matched controls due to limited exercise, so it is essential to stay as active as possible. ...
    Related: disorders, genetic disorder, child health, health nursing, helpless
  • Downs Syndrome, It Is One Of The Most Frequently Occurring Chromosomal Abnormalities Found In Humans Effecting People Of All - 1,868 words
    Down's Syndrome, it is one of the most frequently occurring chromosomal abnormalities found in humans effecting people of all ages, races and economic levels. It is a chromosomal anomaly in cell development that results in a person being born with forty-seven chromosomes instead of the normal forty-six chromosomes. People with Down syndrome may have mild to severe learning disabilities and physical symptoms, which include a small skull, extra folds of skin under the eyes, and a protruding tongue. Roughly one out of every one thousand children born making it the most common genetic disorder. Down syndrome affects over 350,000 people, in the United States alone. Down syndrome has plagued the h ...
    Related: chromosomal, down syndrome, downs, human body, human race, occurring
  • Each Year, Three Thousand To Five Thousand People Are Diagnosed With Down - 906 words
    "Each year, three thousand to five thousand people are diagnosed with Down Syndrome in the United States. It is found in approximately one out of one thousand all live births." (Nadel,37). Down Syndrome occurs when there is an abnormality in chromosome 21. Most people with Down Syndrome (approximately ninety-five percent) has an extra 21 chromosome. Instead of the normal number of forty-six chromosomes in each cell, the individual with Down Syndrome has forty-seven chromosomes. "This condition is called trisomy 21."(Pueschel,6) .Down Syndrome is a combination of birth defects including some degree of physical abnormalities, musculoskeletal disorders, and hypothyroidism. Granted, individuals ...
    Related: diagnosed, down syndrome, blood cells, problems associated, tissue
  • Epilepsy - 384 words
    Epilepsy Epilepsy is a genetic disorder that affects the parts of the brain similar to a computer. These parts communicate electronically. When this can't take place a seizure occurs. When a person has a series of recurring seizures they are usually diagnosed with epilepsy. People with the disorder have an electrical abnormity in there brain. Someone with the disorder will commonly have seizures and some may have asthma. Hippocrates the Greek physician is thought to have been the first to realize that epilepsy runs in families. Recent studies show that a person's chance is up to 4x higher is a blood relative has it. As the number of relatives with it grows so do the chances of getting it. Al ...
    Related: epilepsy, ancient roman, genetic disorder, mental retardation, greek
  • Eugenics - 2,066 words
    ... orn or even fertilized. In this way, a doctor can see that a child will have a genetic disorder and can prepare the parents for the child's birth. The general term for these practices is genetic counseling. This is an umbrella term which includes in vitro fertilization, artificial insemination, amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling. In vitro fertilization and artificial insemination are techniques that were originally created in order to overcome infertility among couples. In vitro fertilization involves fertilizing an egg outside a woman's body and later inserting it into the uterus. Artificial insemination involves placing sperm inside a female in order to fertilize an egg. Due t ...
    Related: eugenics, therapeutic intervention, social costs, vitro fertilization, makeup
  • Genetherapy - 402 words
    Genetherapy Gene Therapy Gene therapy is the use of genes and the techniques of genetic engineering in the treatment of a genetic disorder or chronic disease. There are many techniques of gene therapy. The two basic methods are called in vivo and ex vivo gene therapy. The in vivo method inserts genetically altered genes directly into the patient; the ex vivo method removes tissue from the patient, extracts the cells in question, and genetically alters them before returning them to the patient. The challenge of gene therapy is the development of a means to deliver the genetic material into the nuclei of the appropriate cells, so that it will be reproduced in the normal course of cell division ...
    Related: cell division, immune system, genetic disorder, expose, recombinant
  • Genetic Engineering - 938 words
    Genetic Engineering A girl is born without Tay-Sachs disease, a devasting genetic disorder that has decimated a lot of babies worldwide. A leukemia patient has defective bone marrow replaced with healthy bone marrow that was cloned from tissue from her own cells. These futuristic scenarios are not part of the debate for genetic engineering but they should be. Many people are afraid that somebody will clone Hitler or some evil person, but that is far from the fact. Genetic engineering can be used to make many aspects of human life better, including saving lives. The rapid development of humanitys ability to control the gene will eventually lead to a promising future for the entire planet as a ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic disorder, genetic engineering, genetic screening
  • Genetics - 2,123 words
    Genetics Genetics: Issues of IVF, screening, pre-selection, genetic testing, cloning and the social implications. James Watson once said, We used to think that our fate was in our stars. Now we know that, in large measure, our fate is in our Genes (Jaroff 1998). On June 26th 2000, The Human Genome Project will unveil its rough draft mapping of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences within the human chromosomes (genetic code), to the public. The project has been ongoing since the late eighties, and is a huge international exercise, which has so far cost approximately 3 billion dollars. The final draft is expected to be complete by the year 2003 and the assumption is that it will have a mas ...
    Related: genetic code, genetic disease, genetic disorder, genetic screening, genetic testing, genetics
  • Human Genome Project - 1,376 words
    Human Genome Project HUMAN GENOME PROJECT Adam and Eve were doomed for trying to be like god, this is the same damnation mankind is headed to. Everyone's dream is to have absolute power and control of everything. The genome project and DNA engineering gives man the ability to create life and customize life to his specific needs of likes. So how good is too good? Man's ability to make life or create perfect human beings so they can be in a state of Utopia will disturb the balance of nature. Every individual, every child born on earth is unique i it's own way, not only by looks but also by their character, their DNA. Changing this by producing two of the same kind, of which one is produced in ...
    Related: genome, genome project, human beings, human error, human evolution, human genome
  • I Will Be Discussing The Ways To Receive, Treat, And Cope With The Disease, Autism Autism Occurs In Fifteen Out Of Every Tent - 358 words
    I will be discussing the ways to receive, treat, and cope with the disease, Autism. Autism occurs in fifteen out of every ten-thousand births, and is four times more common in boys than girls. Autism is a severely incapacitating lifelong developmental disability that typically appears during the first three years of life. It has been found throughout the world in families of all racial, ethnic and social backgrounds. No known factors in the psychological environment of a child have been shown to cause autism. Autism is not a genetic disorder, which means it is not passed down from generation to generation, as for example AIDS is. Autism occurs by itself or in association with other disorders ...
    Related: autism, cope, discussing, fifteen, tent
  • Influences On Normal Physical - 1,230 words
    Influences On Normal Physical Physical growth in early childhood is partially easy to measure and gives an idea of how children normally develop during this period. The average child in North America is less than three feet tall at two years of age. Physical growth contains no discrete stages, plateaus, or qualitative changes. Large differences may develop between individual children and among groups of children. Sometimes these differences affect the psychological development of young children. These differences create a nice variety among children. Most dimensions of growth are influenced by the child's genetic background. Also, races and ethnic backgrounds around the world differ in growt ...
    Related: influences, physical growth, mentally retarded, preschool years, selective
  • Mysteries Surrounding Creutzfeldtjakob Disease - 1,830 words
    Mysteries Surrounding Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease The Mysteries Surrounding Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease is a killer. What we know is that it wastes no time. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease will kill a person within one year of contraction. It is yet unknown how Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease chooses its victims, but it does seem to have accomplices, known as the spongiform encephalopathies, in the rest of the animal kingdom. It is possible that it may be known what means Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease uses in order to annihilate its victims, but the theory surrounding that is still controversial. By examining the facts and observing the evidence we shall one day uncover the truth behin ...
    Related: alzheimer's disease, disease control, human disease, mad cow disease, problems associated
  • Neurofibromatosis Its Genetic Implications - 1,348 words
    Neurofibromatosis & Its Genetic Implications The National Institute of Health defines Neurofibromatoses as group genetic disorders that affects the development and growth of neural cell tissues. These disorders cause tumor growth in nerve tissues, skin changes, and in some cases bone deformities. Of the eight possible subtypes of Neurofibromatosis (NF) at least 85% are represented by NF Type 1, also known as von Recklinghausen or classic peripheral neurofibromatosis. It has a prevalence of about 1:4000 live births. An additional ten percent have NF Type 2, also known as acoustic or central neurofibromatosis and occurs in about 1:50,000 live births (Baskin 1). This paper will deal only with t ...
    Related: genetic, genetic counseling, genetic disorder, genetic information, genetic screening, genetic testing
  • Osteogenesis Imperfecta - 1,185 words
    Osteogenesis Imperfecta Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare genetic disorder of collagen synthesis associated with broad spectrum of musculoskeletal problems, most notably bowing and fractures of the extremities, muscle weakness, laxity in the ligaments, and spinal deformities.(Binder, 386). Other collagen-containing skeletal tissues, such as the sclerae, the teeth, and the heart valves are also affected to a variable degree. OI has a common feature of bony fragility associated with defective formation of collagen by osteoblasts and fibroblasts(Smith, 1983, 13). This disease, involving defective development of the connective tissues, is usually the result of the autosomal dominant gene, b ...
    Related: hearing loss, life expectancy, vital signs, depending, ultrasound
  • Osteogenesis Imperfecta - 1,168 words
    ... encing can be carried out in chronic villa biopsies at 8-12 weeks. There is no known treatment of OI at this time. Treatment therefore is predominantly supportive and educational. Because of multiple fractures and bruising, it is important to diagnose this disease in order to prevent accusations of child abuse. Treatment of fractures is often challenging because of abnormal bone structure and laxity of the ligaments. Splinting devices are used to stabilize the bones and to protect against additional fractures. Treatment aims to prevent deformities through use of traction and/or immobilization in order to aid in normal development and rehabilitation. Limb deformities and repeated fracture ...
    Related: advisory council, bone fracture, medical center, health, endurance
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