Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: genetic code

  • 44 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • Aids And Retroviruses - 1,286 words
    ... AP) to a cellular receptor. Receptor molecules can be proteins (glycoproteins), or the sugar residues present on glycoproteins or glycolipids. Some complex viruses, for example, Poxviruses and Herpesviruses may have more than one receptor-binding protein, therefore, there may be alternative routes of uptake into cells. The expression or absence of receptors on the surface of cells largely determines the tropism of most viruses, that is, the type of cell in which they are able to replicate.  Penetration Unlike attachment, viral penetration is an energy-dependent process; that is, the cell must be metabolically active for this to occur. Three mechanisms may be involved:  Tr ...
    Related: aids, genetic code, life cycle, immune system, replication
  • Aids Whats New Is The Message Getting Through We Already Know Enough About Aids To Prevent Its Spread, But Ignorance, Complac - 1,708 words
    AIDS - What's new ? ------------------- Is the message getting through? We already know enough about AIDS to prevent its spread, but ignorance, complacency, fear and bigotry continue to stop many from taking adequate precautions. We know enough about how the infection is transmitted to protect ourselves from it without resorting to such extremes as mandatory testing, enforced quarantine or total celibacy. But too few people are heeding the AIDS message. Perhaps many simply don't like or want to believe what they hear, preferring to think that AIDS "can't happen to them." Experts repeatedly remind us that infective agents do not discriminate, but can infect any and everyone. Like other commun ...
    Related: aids, whats, human cells, blood cells, usual
  • Apoptosis And Aging - 1,110 words
    Apoptosis And Aging When we gain control of the gene responsible for the phenomenon of apoptosis, we will be in control of aging. We are finding more evidence every day, indicating genetic links to all sorts of factors in the human being. We are just now beginning to scratch the surface of our own genetics. A landmark discover has just been unveiled: In February [2001], the two groups charting the human genome published their results - the entire 3 billion base pair sequence. The only definitive conclusion so far: Humans are far more complicated than we thought. ... Eric Lander, director of the Whitehead Center for Genome Research in Cambridge, Massachusetts ... adds: "within a decade, we wi ...
    Related: aging, apoptosis, personal interview, natural process, florida
  • Beyond The Problem Of Evil - 3,996 words
    Beyond The Problem Of Evil evil Beyond the Problem of Evil Introduction: The problem of evil is, in my opinion, the best point of departure for a fruitful dialogue between Christianity, traditionally conceived, and those strands of modern philosophy which have been perceived--indeed, have sometimes perceived themselves--as a threat to that tradition. As such, I will attempt first, to outline the problem of evil in the starkest terms possible, presenting Augustine's approach to its solution followed by a critical analysis; second, to present an alternative approach to the questions which give rise to the problem--an approach derived in large part from Spinoza and Nietzsche; and, third, to sho ...
    Related: good and evil, falls short, human experience, free choice, referring
  • Cancer - 1,605 words
    Cancer Final Draft T. J. Cox The problem is cancer. Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the world and my interest in the subject is simple. My mother is the most resilient person I have ever met. Any time I need any kind of inspiration, I need only to think of her. When she was eighteen she was diagnosed with Hodgkins disease. The doctors gave her a less than thirty percent chance of living. Since then she has had cancer three other times. Breast cancer twice in 85 and 90, and most recently, colon cancer two summers ago. She has had many different treatments including chemo and radiation therapy as well as surgery to remove lumps in both breasts and her colon. What is cancer? Ther ...
    Related: breast cancer, cancer, cancer therapy, colon cancer, radiation therapy
  • Dna Profiling - 1,211 words
    ... the fundamental principle of the insurance business is "pooling uncertainty." The concept of adverse selection also causes insurers much dismay. Adverse selection refers to the probability that people privately aware of a medical problem are more likely to seek medical insurance. This negates the insurers policy of setting premiums with accordance to statistical information on the rates of illnesses and sicknesses in society. "The whole foundation of insurance is based on the fact that we and the insurance applicant are operating with equal levels of knowledge and ignorance." Without this level of ignorance, insurance companies will lose their social value as a means of spreading risk a ...
    Related: dna profiling, profiling, genetic screening, statistical information, adverse
  • Downs Syndrome, It Is One Of The Most Frequently Occurring Chromosomal Abnormalities Found In Humans Effecting People Of All - 1,868 words
    Down's Syndrome, it is one of the most frequently occurring chromosomal abnormalities found in humans effecting people of all ages, races and economic levels. It is a chromosomal anomaly in cell development that results in a person being born with forty-seven chromosomes instead of the normal forty-six chromosomes. People with Down syndrome may have mild to severe learning disabilities and physical symptoms, which include a small skull, extra folds of skin under the eyes, and a protruding tongue. Roughly one out of every one thousand children born making it the most common genetic disorder. Down syndrome affects over 350,000 people, in the United States alone. Down syndrome has plagued the h ...
    Related: chromosomal, down syndrome, downs, human body, human race, occurring
  • E Coli - 1,806 words
    E. Coli Do natural medicines work as well as over the counter medicines? This question has been argued about for quite a while. In my experiment, I will compare natural medicines effectiveness on Escherichia coli to over the counter drugs, to finally decide if herbal remedies are better than E. coliEscherichia coli (E. coli) is a common bacteria in your stomach and intestines. E. coli is a gram negative rod bacteria(Fundamentals of Microbiology). E. coli bacteria make up 0.1% of the total bacteria in an adults stomach. E. coli has recently been in the news due to several cases of food poisoning by E. coli 0157:h7. This is a specific strain of E. coli and this particular strain causes a life ...
    Related: coli, food supply, genetic code, blood pressure, medicine
  • Effects Of Genetic Engineering On Agriculture - 1,696 words
    Effects Of Genetic Engineering On Agriculture The Effects of Genetic Engineering on Agriculture Agribiotechnology is the study of making altered agricultural products. Agribusiness is trying to alter the genes of already existing products to try to enhance the biocompetitiveness and adaptability of crops by enhancing plant resistance to drought, salinity, disease, pests and herbicides. They are going to try to enhance their growth, productivity, nutrient value, and chemical composition. The old way of doing this was through selective breeding, special fertilizer, and hormones. This seems now somewhat outdated with todays technology. Genetic engineering comes with many downfalls. Increased pr ...
    Related: agriculture, department of agriculture, engineering, genetic, genetic code, genetic engineering, genetic research
  • Eugenics - 1,452 words
    Eugenics President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, as the nation approached its third year of bloody civil war. The proclamation declared "that all persons held as slaves" within the rebellious states "are, and henceforward shall be free." The Civil War was fought to save the republic and free the enslaved. World War II was fought to save the world and stop a group which thought they were a superior race. What do these two wars have in common? They were fought, in part, for equality. The difference or believed difference between people causes tension and discrimination. Genetic engineering will cause a new form of differences between people and will c ...
    Related: eugenics, equal opportunity, abraham lincoln, genetically modified, tangible
  • Francis Crick - 999 words
    Francis Crick In 1953, Dr. Francis Crick and James Watson discovered the structure of the DNA molecule. This is the molecule which we now know stores the genetic information for all life. Many scientists have claimed the discovery to be the single most important development in biology during the 20th century. Watson and Crick's investigation into the nature of the genetic code and the passing of information from generation to generation has redefined the study of genetics. Also, it has basically created the science of molecular biology. For their outstanding work, James Watson and Dr. Francis Crick were awarded the 1962 Nobel Prize. As a youth, Francis Crick attended Northhampton Grammar Sch ...
    Related: crick, francis, francis crick, double helix, research council
  • Frankenstein By Shelley - 1,030 words
    Frankenstein By Shelley Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley is a complex novel that was written during the age of Romanticism. This gothic work has enjoyed a wide range of interest and readership for roughly 200 years. Gothic tales have certain elements in common, chief among them being certain universal themes, eerie settings, twisted creatures and a breach in the natural order. Shelly's "Frankenstein" is a perfect example of a gothic novel. In this book she explores as her main theme the development of evil in an individual when he is subject to rejection by society. She also develops two secondary themes: man's fear of death, and man's conflict between morality and science. These two themes are ...
    Related: frankenstein, mary shelley, shelley, mentally retarded, human life
  • Genetic Engineering - 1,131 words
    Genetic Engineering Genetic Engineering Anti-technologists and political extremists misinform, and over exaggerate statements that genetic engineering is not part of the natural order of things. The moral question of genetic engineering can be answered by studying human evolution and the idea of survival of the fittest. The question of safety can be answered by looking at the current precautions of the industry. The concept that society needs to understand is that with the right amount of time and money genetic engineering will help reduce disease and save countless lives. Many people do not realize that genetic engineering plays a role in many lives through out the world. Genetic engineerin ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic code, genetic engineering, nobel prize
  • Genetic Engineering - 840 words
    Genetic Engineering Genetic Engineering Within the last two decades scientists have developed several new techniques, which manipulate and alter the genes found in the cells of living organisms. This wonder of the century, genetic engineering has turned heredity - the passing of inheritable characteristics from parent to off spring- from a natural, random event into a process that can be artificially controlled and exploited. It has the potential of giving humanity unprecedented power over life itself, and it has thus raised profound questions in such diverse areas as the environment, agriculture, biological warfare, and animal rights. Genetic engineering has clearly become the controversial ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic code, genetic engineering, human beings
  • Genetic Engineering - 1,177 words
    Genetic Engineering In todays world, people are learning a great deal in the rapidly growing and developing fields of science and technology. Almost Each day, an individual can see or hear about new discoveries and advances in these fields of study. One very common topic that has been in the news and social talk of all people recently is what us human beings will be able to do through the development of science and technology in the future. The most heated and controversial of these topics that I notice is in the field of genetic testing and engineering in humans. Many people have wondered about whether the manipulation of human cells is somehow contrary to the laws of nature or religion esp ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic code, genetic engineering, genetic information, genetic research, genetic testing
  • Genetics - 2,123 words
    Genetics Genetics: Issues of IVF, screening, pre-selection, genetic testing, cloning and the social implications. James Watson once said, We used to think that our fate was in our stars. Now we know that, in large measure, our fate is in our Genes (Jaroff 1998). On June 26th 2000, The Human Genome Project will unveil its rough draft mapping of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences within the human chromosomes (genetic code), to the public. The project has been ongoing since the late eighties, and is a huge international exercise, which has so far cost approximately 3 billion dollars. The final draft is expected to be complete by the year 2003 and the assumption is that it will have a mas ...
    Related: genetic code, genetic disease, genetic disorder, genetic screening, genetic testing, genetics
  • Genetics Engineering - 1,487 words
    Genetics Engineering Genetic engineering is an umbrella term that can cover a wide range of ways of changing the genetic material -- the DNA code -- in a living organism. This code contains all the information, stored in a long chain chemical molecule, which determines the nature of the organism. Apart from identical twins, genetic make-up is unique to each individual. Individual genes are particular sections of this chain, spaced out along it, which determine the characteristics and functions of our body. Defects of individual genes can cause a malfunction in the metabolism of the body, and are the roots of many "genetic" diseases. In a sense, man has been using genetic engineering for thou ...
    Related: engineering, genetic code, genetic engineering, genetic information, genetics
  • Gentic Engineering - 2,224 words
    GENTIC ENGINEERING Abstract This paper sets out to defend human genetic engineering with a new bioethical approach, post-humanism, combined with a radical democratic political framework. Arguments for the restriction of human genetic engineering, and specifically germ-line enhancement, are reviewed. Arguments are divided into those which are fundamental matters of faith, or "bio-Luddite" arguments, and those which can be addressed through public policy, or "gene-angst" arguments. The four bio-Luddite concerns addressed are: Medicine Makes People Sick; There are Sacred Limits of the Natural Order; Technologies Always Serve Ruling Interests; The Genome is Too Complicated to Engineer. I argue t ...
    Related: engineering, genetic engineering, authoritarian state, democratic state, diversification
  • Gentic Engineering - 2,250 words
    ... ilities; the difficulties lie not in the means of production, but in the relations of production, the social and political context in which the technology is deployed. A second, and far less Marxian observation, is that social domination has some biological determinants. Patriarchy is, in part, based on women's physical vulnerability, and their special role in reproduction. While industrialization, contraception and the liberal democratic state may have removed the bulk of patriarchy's weight, genetic technology offers to remove the rest. Similarly, while racism, ageism, heterosexism, and so on may be only 10% biological and 90% social construction, at least the biological factors can be ...
    Related: engineering, genetic engineering, animal research, medical research, tier
  • God Existence Question - 1,831 words
    ... ible for God's existence--their own selves. Consider, for example, the human body. It is composed of 30+ different kinds of cells, totaling over `100 trillion' cells when all added together to make up the human adult.. These cells come in all different sizes and shapes, with different functions and life expectancies. For example, some cells (e.g., male spermatozoa) are so small that 20,000 would fit inside a capital "O" from a standard typewriter, each being only 1/20th mm long. Some cells, put end-to-end, would make only one inch if 6,000 were assembled together. Yet all the cells of the human body, if set end- to-end, would encircle the earth over 200 times. Even the largest cell of th ...
    Related: existence of god, god's existence, the bible, white blood cells, mathematical
  • 44 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3