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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: general theory

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  • General Theory Of Alcoholism - 1,572 words
    General Theory Of Alcoholism There are many theories of alcoholism, and some approaches explain and treat certain alcoholics better than others. One of the common themes throughout the readings is that addicts display a range of personal and situational problems. There is no "typical" addicted personality or emotional problem (Allen, 1996). Because of these facts, it comes as no surprise that there are also no typical assessment or treatment for these individuals. For instance, a medical/disease model of alcoholism may be more useful to some alcoholics than others. The point is that instead of rigidly applying one model, a counselor's goal is to use the models that are most effective to the ...
    Related: alcoholism, general theory, environmental factors, annotated bibliography, obsessed
  • A Philosopher Of Nature - 1,482 words
    A Philosopher Of Nature A PHILOSOPHER OF NATURE December 1, 1998 Paper # 2 Intro to Philosophy Fifty years ago the single greatest philosopher walked upon this earth. How can I be so dauntless as to refer to one man as The Greatest philosopher? The answer is simple. All philosophers ask questions. Few of these questions will produce earth-shattering revelations and even fewer will change the world. Out of the handful of philosophers who have made a difference in the world I can think of only one who has, by use of an amazing mind and knowledge of complex mathematics, changed the world forever. Albert Einstein was born in Ulm Germany on March 14, 1879, and spent his youth in Munich, where his ...
    Related: philosopher, franklin d roosevelt, general theory, second world, fascination
  • Albert Einstein - 1,590 words
    Albert Einstein Albert Einstein Einstein was born on March 14, 1879, in Ulm Germany. He lived there with his parents, Herman and Pauline. After a year in Ulm, due to the failure of his father's electrical and engineering workshop, the Einstein family moved to Munich (the capital of Bavaria), where after a year in residence there, Einstein's mother had Maja, Einstein's sister. Despite the fact that he was Jewish, from age five until age ten, Einstein attended a Catholic School near his home. But, at age 10, Einstein was transferred to the Luitpold Gymnasium, where Latin, Greek, History, and Geography were pounded into childrens' heads. His parents wanted him to finish school, get his diploma ...
    Related: albert, albert einstein, einstein, jewish faith, natural world
  • Albert Einstein - 1,461 words
    Albert Einstein Albert Einstein In the next few pages I will talk about a famous mathematician I decided to choose and write an essay about. I chose probably the most well known mathematician/inventor in the world, his name is Albert Einstein. I chose him because he is the one I know the most about and finding information would not have been as hard. In the next few pages I will tell you about his life as a kid, his life as a mathematician, and his life as an inventor. His name was Albert Einstein. He was born on March 14, 1879 in Ulm, Germany. Before his first birthday, his family had moved to Munich were Albert's father, Hermann Einstein, and uncle set up a small Electro-chemical business. ...
    Related: albert, albert einstein, einstein, world war 1, random house
  • Albert Einstein - 1,216 words
    Albert Einstein Albert Einstein Albert Einstein was one of the greatest brains ever to come to the 20th century. Einstein contributed to the 20th century more than any other scientist ever. His theory of relativity is held as the highest quality of a human thought ever to come. Albert Einstein was born on March 14, 1879 in Ulm, Wurttemberg, Germany. His family moved from Ulm to Munich and had an unsuccessful business that made them move later to Milan, Italy. His parents were dealing with electrical apparatus. At this time Albert left his German citizenship. He persuades an exam that would give him the opportunity to study electrical engineering in Zurich Polytechnic but failed to pass it. A ...
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  • Albert Einstein - 1,498 words
    Albert Einstein Einsteins early life; Einstein was born in Ulm, Germany on Mar. 14, 1879. Einstein's parents, who were non observant Jews, moved from Ulm to Munich when Einstein was an infant. The family business was the manufacture of electrical parts. When the business failed, in 1894, the family moved to Milan, Italy. At this time Einstein decided officially to relinquish his German citizenship. Within a year, still without having completed secondary school, Einstein failed an examination that would have allowed him to take a course of study leading to a diploma as an electrical engineer at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. He spent the next year in nearby Aarau at the continual ...
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  • Albert Einstein - 1,015 words
    Albert Einstein Albert Einstein was a famous scientist, writer and professor. He was born in Ulm, Germany, on March 24,1879. As a child, Einstein wasn't like the other boys: he hated school but loved math. He was shy, and talked very slowly. He didn't participate in sports but instead played with mechanical toys, put together jigsaw puzzles, built towers and studied nature. At school and home he would ask many questions and because of that everybody thought he was dumb. Once when he was sick in bed, his father Herman, bought him a compass; and Albert asked "Why does the needle point to the north?" His father didn't know the answer. Herman was calm, friendly and had a black mustache. Einstein ...
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  • Albert Einstein - 749 words
    Albert Einstein Albert Einstein was one of a few scientists that change the way we look at the world Today. He was born in 1879 and die on 1955. In that time he made many theories on how the world works. Einstein got married twice once to a class mate and once his cousin. Einstein also like music and he played the violin. Albert Einstein is on of few scientist who had changed the way the world works today. Albert Einstein was born in Ulm Germany on March 14 1879. He died in Princeton on April 18 1955 at the age of 76. Albert Einstein did not like his school in Germany. His best subject in school were mathematics and science. At The age of 12 he taught himself Euclidean geometry. Later when h ...
    Related: albert, albert einstein, einstein, theory of relativity, world today
  • Albert Einsteinman Of Vision - 1,905 words
    Albert Einstein-Man Of Vision Albert Einstein: Man of Vision Albert Einstein, perhaps the greatest mind ever to have walked the face of the earth, was born on March 14, 1879 in Ulm, Germany. As a boy, he hated school, and felt that the regimented and repetitive nature of schooling in Germany at that time had any promise of helping his future. He did not do well in school, mainly because he did not care to learn what was being taught to him. While he seemed to be a bright child, his schoolwork did not interest him, but at the same time the simple compass that his father owned fascinated him. Albert constantly harassed his father and his Uncle Jake with questions concerning how the compass wor ...
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  • Albert Einstien - 1,742 words
    Albert Einstien Men and Women of Science Albert Einstein Early Life Einstein was born in Ulm, Germany on Mar. 14, 1879. Einstein's parents, who were non observant Jews, moved from Ulm to Munich, Germany when Einstein was an infant. The family business was the manufacture of electrical parts. When the business failed, in 1894, the family moved to Milan, Italy. At this time Einstein decided officially to end his German citizenship. Within a year, still without having completed secondary school, Einstein failed an examination that would have allowed him to pursue a course of study leading to a diploma as an electrical engineer at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. He spent the next year ...
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  • Alberty Einstein - 592 words
    Alberty Einstein ALBERT EINSTEIN Albert Einstein was one of the greatest scientists of all time. Best known as a physicist for developing his famous theory of relativity, Einstein was born on March 14, 1879, in Ulm, Wrttemberg, Germany. When he was five years old, his father showed him a pocket compass. Young Einstein was deeply impressed by the mysterious behavior of the compass needle, which kept pointing the same direction no matter which way the compass was turned. He later said he felt then that something deeply hidden had to be behind such things. Einstein attended public school in Munich and in Aarau, Switzerland. He then studied mathematics and physics at the Swiss Polytechnic Instit ...
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  • Americas Great Depression - 1,607 words
    America's Great Depression America's Great Depression by Chima Lonstone The Great Depression is probably one of the most misunderstood events in American history. It is routinely cited, as proof that unregulated capitalism is not the best in the world, and that only a massive welfare state, huge amounts of economic regulation, and other Interventions can save capitalism from itself. Among the many myths surrounding the Great Depression are that Herbert Hoover was a laissez faire president and that FDR brought us out of the depression. What caused the Great Depression? To get a handle on that, it's necessary to look at previous depressions and compare. The Great Depression was by no means the ...
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  • Black Holes - 1,073 words
    ... or real, existing ones. The singularity in the this hole is more time-like, while the other is more space-like. With this subtle difference, objects would be able to enter the black whole from regions away from the equator of the event horizon and not be destroyed. The reason it is called a black hole is because any light inside of the singularity would be pulled back by the infinite gravity so that none of it could escape. As a result anything passing beyond the event horizon would dissappear from sight forever, thus making the black hole impossible for humans to see without using technologicalyl advanced instruments for measuring such things like radiation. The second part of the name ...
    Related: black hole, black holes, surrounding area, general theory, oppenheimer
  • Black Holes: Infinity And Beyond - 1,439 words
    Black Holes: Infinity and Beyond If theories of their existence are true, black holes are the most powerful force in the known physical universe. Many people are familiar with the term black hole, but few people actually know anything about them. A black hole forms as a result of a massive star running out of fuel to burn (Chaisson, 193). Once the star is no longer exerting outward force by burning off gases, it begins to collapse under its own intense, inward gravity (Chaisson, 193). It is like slowly letting the air out of a balloon. Once the star is compacted to a certain size, while its mass, or weight, remains the same, its gravity becomes so powerful that nothing can escape it (Hawking ...
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  • Blackholes - 1,846 words
    Blackholes Black holes are objects so dense that not even light can escape their gravity, and since nothing can travel faster than light, nothing can escape from inside a black hole . Loosely speaking, a black hole is a region of space that has so much mass concentrated in it that there is no way for a nearby object to escape its gravitational pull. Since our best theory of gravity at the moment is Einstein's general theory of relativity, we have to delve into some results of this theory to understand black holes in detail, by thinking about gravity under fairly simple circumstances. Suppose that you are standing on the surface of a planet. You throw a rock straight up into the air. Assuming ...
    Related: theory of relativity, black hole, black holes, absorption, faster
  • Chinese Medicine - 1,419 words
    ... tions. A parallel survey of 197 acupuncturists, who are more apt to see immediate complications, yielded 132 cases of fainting, 26 cases of increased pain, 8 cases of pneumothorax, and 45 other adverse results [10]. However, a 5-year study involving 76 acupuncturists at a Japanese medical facility tabulated only 64 adverse event reports (including 16 forgotten needles and 13 cases of transient low blood pressure) associated with 55,591 acupuncture treatments. No serious complications were reported.The researchers concluded that serious adverse reactions are uncommon among acupuncturists who are medically trained [11]. Questionable Standards In 1971, an acupuncture boom occurred in the Un ...
    Related: alternative medicine, chinese, chinese medicine, holistic medicine, medicine, oriental medicine, traditional chinese
  • Christianity In Ancient Rome - 979 words
    Christianity in Ancient Rome The way the Romans viewed Christianity is slightly different from the general theory. The Romans did not spend all their time hunting down Christians in order to crucify them or throw them to the lions. When Christianity first started in the Roman Empire, it was viewed as another sect of Judaism. There was no differentiating between the Jews and the Christians in the eyes of the Roman government. The Christians were seen simply as a more radical group of Jews. They were also not completely trusted because of their monotheistic belief and non-acceptance of the Roman gods. Not much was even known about them by the Romans because of their mostly secretive ways. This ...
    Related: ancient rome, christianity, rome, roman empire, general theory
  • Drugs And Crime - 1,492 words
    Drugs And Crime The link between drug use and crime is not a new one. For more than twenty years, both the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute of Justice have funded many studies to try to better understand the connection. One such study was done in Baltimore on heroin users. This study found high rates of criminality among users during periods of active drug use, and much lower rates during periods of nonuse (Ball et al. 1983, pp.119-142). A large number of people who abuse drugs come into contact with the criminal justice system when they are sent to jail or to other correctional facilities. The criminal justice system is flooded with substance abusers. The need for ...
    Related: crime, drug abuse, drug addicts, drug education, drug treatment, drug treatment programs, drugs
  • Drugs And Crime - 1,450 words
    ... t if they live with the general population, it is much harder to break away from old habits. The primary clinical staff is usually made up of former substance abusers that at one time were rehabilitated in therapeutic communities. The perspective of the treatment is that the problem is with the whole person and not the drug. The addiction is a symptom and not the core of the disorder. The primary goal is to change patterns of behavior, thinking, and feeling that predispose drug use (Inciardi et al. 1997, pp. 261-278). This returns to the general theory of crime and the argument that it is the opportunity that creates the problem. If you take away the opportunity to commit crimes by chang ...
    Related: crime, crime prevention, drug abuse, drug treatment, drugs, drugs and crime, war on drugs
  • Evolution - 353 words
    Evolution The process by which all living things have developed from primitive life forms through changes occurring over billions of years is evolution. All living things arose through a long history of changes formed by physical and chemical processes that are still taking place. It is possible that all organisms can be traced back to the origin of life from inanimate matter. Paleontology is the most direct proof of evolution because it studies life of the past. Approximately 2 million different species of organisms are now living, but at least 99.9 percent of the species that have ever lived are now in extinction and about 2 billion species have evolved during the past 600 billion years (B ...
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