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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: gangster

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  • Al Capone Is Perhaps The Best Known Gangster Of All Time And By Far The Most - 945 words
    Al Capone is perhaps the best known gangster of all time and by far the most powerful mob boss of his era. His mob dominated the Chicago area from 1925 to 1931, when he was imprisoned for income tax evasion. This was the only crime the courts could prove against him. He went to jail at Alcatraz for eight years until he became very ill with syphilis and died from the disease in 1947 (URL:http://www.broonale.co.uk/ austria/capone.html 1-3). Al Capone was born somewhere in Brooklyn on January 17, 1899 but knowbody really knows for sure. Capone grew up in a tough neighborhood in Brooklyn, N.Y. He attended school through the sixth grade. He recieved his nickname Scarface during these years as a r ...
    Related: capone, gangster, tax evasion, life story, commission
  • Al Capone - 1,357 words
    Al Capone Organized crime was not so organized up until the 1920s. When the 1920s arrived, the American lifestyle changed dramatically. People started investing money in home appliances and automobiles, womens skirts became higher and drinking became very popular. Also, organized crime came to a rise in the 1920s. And in the high ranks of organized crime was Al Capone. Al Capone ran many illegal businesses including bootlegging, gambling, prostitution, and murders. There were many gangs in the world of organized crime and Al Capones was at the top. Al Capone was the most infamous gangster in the 1920s. Being a big time gangster was big business. Money was made fast and very easily. Bootleggi ...
    Related: alphonse capone, capone, world series, racial issues, fixing
  • Al Capone - 367 words
    Al Capone Perhaps the best-known gangster of all time, Al "Scarface" Capone was the most powerful mob boss of his era. He dominated organized crime in the Chicago area from 1925 until 1931, when he was imprisoned for federal income tax evasion. Alphonse Capone was born on Jan. 17, 1899, in a tough neighborhood of Brooklyn, N.Y. He attended school up to the sixth grade. His nickname, Scarface, resulted from a knife attack by the brother of a girl Capone had insulted that left three scars on his face. Capone joined the James Street gang, headed by Johnny Torrio. In 1920 Torrio asked Capone to go to Chicago to work for his uncle, Big Jim Colosimo, head of the city's largest prostitution and gam ...
    Related: alphonse capone, capone, street gang, tax evasion, begun
  • Alphonse Capone - 503 words
    Alphonse Capone Alphonse Capone Born 1/17/1899, Brooklyn Died 1/25/1947, Florida Al Capone is one of the most recognized names in American history. Alphonse was born to Neapolitan immigrants Gabriel and Teresa. His surname, originally Caponi, had been Americanized to Capone. The Capone family included James, Ralph, Salvatore (Frank), Alphonse, John, Albert, Matthew, Rose and Mafalda. Capone was proud to be an American I'm no Italian. I was born in Brooklyn, he often said. Al went to school with Salvatore Lucania, later known as Lucky Luciano. At about the age of ten he began to follow up-and-coming gangster Johnny Torrio, also a Neapolitan. At fourteen he quit school after striking a teacher ...
    Related: alphonse capone, capone, american history, old world, forgive
  • Argument Against The Legalization Of Marijuna - 1,687 words
    Argument Against The Legalization Of Marijuna Argument against the legalization of marijuna The legalization of marijuana is one of the most highly debated about subjects facing Canadians and Americans today. Advocates of legalization use two major arguments in their effort to have marijuana legalized. First, which is by far the biggest argument is that marijuana has a significant medical use. The second argument is that marijuana does not cause harm to those that smoke it. Both of these arguments can be easily discounted by the numerous studies that have been done on the effects of marijuana both medicinal and recreational. In the following paragraphs we will explore the hard facts of marij ...
    Related: drug legalization, legalization, legalize marijuana, criminal behavior, intoxicated
  • Arthur Miller And Tennessee Williams, Including A Streetcar Named Desire - 4,269 words
    ... g the subject matter of Face to Face (1975) overly familiar and rating his English-language The Serpent's Egg (1977) an overall failure. Autumn Sonata (1978) and From the Life of the Marionettes (1980) were critical successes, however, although the latter failed at the box office. Fanny and Alexander (1983), a rich and fantastic portrait of childhood in a theatrical family, was regarded as one of his finest films and won an Academy Award for best foreign language film of 1983. Subsequently, Bergman directed After the Rehearsal (1984), his meditation on a life in the theater. WILLIAM S. PECHTER Bibliography: Bergman, Ingmar, Bergman on Bergman (1973); Cowie, Peter, Ingmar Bergman: A Criti ...
    Related: arthur, arthur miller, miller, named desire, streetcar, streetcar named, streetcar named desire
  • Baby Face Nelson - 753 words
    Baby Face Nelson "BABY FACE" NELSON DEAD: LIFE IN REVIEW "Baby Face" Nelson's shredded body was discovered today, lying naked in a ditch near Niles, Illinois, after a deadly encounter with 2 FBI agents yesterday, November 27,1934. The FBI agents, Sam Cowley and Herman Hollis, were also tragically killed in the crossfire. "Baby Face" Nelson, real name was Lester M. Gillis. He went by many other aliases such as George Nelson, Alex Gillis, and "Big George." He grew up with the Chicago street gangs, which is where his gang members named him "Baby Face Nelson," despite the fact that he hated it. By the age of 14 he was stealing cars. In his teens he took part in stealing tires, running stills, bo ...
    Related: nelson, south dakota, public enemy, john paul, dakota
  • Belly - 1,158 words
    Belly The motion picture Belly explores the ghetto and the characters that live in this dark and obscure world of violence and criminal behavior. Tommy or Bunz, and Sincere, who both live in New York, have differing views of criminal life. Bunz lives a mixed up, drug-run lifestyle, while Sincere aspires to be a law-abiding family man. To help the audience get the full effect of evilness portrayed by the character, the scenes are very dark and gloomy. There are, however, lighter scenes in which the good heart of one man is represented. The lighting in Belly helps with the characterization within the movie. One character is shown as a dark figure, and one as an almost holy figure, plus disillu ...
    Related: belly, motion picture, criminal behavior, reading books, characterization
  • Blaxploitation - 1,352 words
    Blaxploitation The Emergence of Colour In todays culturally diverse, politically correct society, it is hard to believe that at one time racism was not only accepted as the norm, but enjoyed for its entertainment value. Individuals of African descent in North America today take the large, diverse pool of opportunities offered by the film industry for granted. Much like Canadian theatre however, there was a time when a black man in any role, be it servant or slave, was virtually unheard of. It took the blaxpliotation films of the early nineteen seventies to change the stereotypical depiction of Black people in American Cinema, as it took The Farm Story, performed by a small troop of Canadian ...
    Related: film industry, ultimate goal, civil war, lucas, nigger
  • Brighton Rock By Greene - 720 words
    Brighton Rock By Greene "Does Greene raise his characters from mere functions in a detective novel to characters whose motivations are believable?" Use two characters to illustrate your argument. Brighton Rock, by Graham Greene, is a book based in 1930s underworld Brighton. The novel is based on the tale of Pinky, a teenage gangster, and his conflict against an amateur detective, Ida, who is intent on bringing Pinky to justice. In many ways Brighton Rock can be classed as a detective novel as it contains certain elements of this particular style of writing. Features characteristically used in such novels include thriller elements, violence and rapidly paced action, all of which are present i ...
    Related: brighton, brighton rock, graham greene, greene, rock
  • Bullets Over Broadway - 911 words
    Bullets Over Broadway Bullets Over Broadway is definitely something you've never seen before. It's hard to imagine any other writer in the entire world coming up with the basic plot that drives the film. Woody Allen takes a humerous concept and allows it to grow more absurd and surreal with each passing moment. And somehow, by film's end, the ridiculous seems acceptable. The film has been referred to as a comic take on the themes explored in Crimes and Misdemeanors, and while a comparison is interesting, I don't necessarily think it holds up. Bullets Over Broadway is an entirely unique film, inhabiting a bizarre universe completely its own. While both films feature the killing of an innocent ...
    Related: broadway, love affair, the girl, best director, sore
  • Censorship And Music - 1,208 words
    Censorship And Music Censoring Music from Our Children I will kill you, you dont want to f*** with me, b**** I will kill you (Eminem). Is this the type of music we want our children listening to? Unfortunately, these lyrics by popular music star Eminem are exactly what children today are being subjected to. Musicians write music and gear their lyrics toward a certain group of people. However, if heard by the wrong crowd it may be offensive to certain age groups, cultures, or races. Therefore, censoring the music is a necessary action that we must take to prevent corruption of the youth and our culture. By censoring music we are preventing children from hearing the sex, violence, and racism t ...
    Related: censorship, music, music videos, popular music, south pacific
  • Cubas Politics - 1,690 words
    Cuba`s Politics While the isle of Cuba was initially discovered on October 27, 1492 during one of Columbus first voyages, it wasnt actually claimed by Spain until the sixteenth century. However, its tumultuous beginnings as a Spanish sugar colony provides an insightful backdrop into the very essence of the countrys political and economic unrest. From its early revolutionary days to the insurrectional challenge of the Marxist-Leninist theories emerged the totalitarian regime under Fidel Castro in present day Cuba. Cuban colonial society was distinguished by the characteristics of colonial societies in general, namely a stratified, inegalitarian class system; a poorly differentiated agricultur ...
    Related: post cold, fidel castro, international community, mood, accelerated
  • Drugs Transportation - 1,250 words
    Drugs Transportation On July 30, Federal agents charged twelve Delta Air Lines employees of smuggling drugs into the United States. Nine Delta Airlines workers were arrested and three others are sought as suspects in a scheme that brought 10 tons of Colombian cocaine into the U.S. via Delta flights from Puerto Rico. Over a three to four year period, employees stashed cocaine in suitcases and packed the drug into cargo containers which were then transported primarily to New York from San Juan's Munz Marin International Airport, agents said (Christopher Wren, Nine at Delta Are Seized in Smuggling of Cocaine, New York Times, July 31, 1997, p. A23; Delta workers indicted on cocaine smuggling cha ...
    Related: drug control, drug policy, drug smuggling, drug trade, drug war, drugs, national drug
  • Fbi - 1,907 words
    F.B.I. The agency now known as the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) was founded in 1908 when Attorney General Charles J. Bonaparte appointed an unnamed force of Special Agents to be the investigative force of the Department of Justice (DOJ). Prior to that time, DOJ borrowed Agents from the U.S. Secret Service to investigate violations of federal criminal laws within its jurisdiction. By order of Attorney General George W. Wickersham, the Special Agent force was named the Bureau of Investigation in 1909. Following a series of changes in name, the Federal Bureau of Investigation officially received its present title in 1935. During the early period of the FBI's history, its Agents investi ...
    Related: federal bureau, work experience, states department, robbery
  • Feminism In Movies Inspired By Bonnie Clyde - 1,053 words
    Feminism In Movies Inspired By Bonnie & Clyde Throughout motion picture history, women have experienced more transition in their roles, as a result of changing societal norms, than any other class. At first, both society and the movie industry preached that women should be dependent on men and remain in the home, in order to guarantee stability in the community and the family. As time passed and attitudes changed, women were beginning to be depicted as strong willed, independent minded characters, who were eager to break away from convention. The genre of the crime film represents such a change in the roles handed to women. Two films that can be contrasted, in order to support this view, are ...
    Related: bonnie, clyde, clyde barrow, feminism, movie industry, movie star, movies
  • Film Contributions Of The Sixties - 1,630 words
    Film Contributions Of The Sixties Beginning roughly with the release of Stanley Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove: Or How I Stopped Worrying and Loved the Bomb in 1964, and continuing for about the next decade, the "Sixties" era of filmmaking made many lasting impressions on the motion picture industry. Although editing and pacing styles varied greatly from Martin Scorcesse's hyperactive pace, to Kubrick's slow methodical pace, there were many uniform contributions made by some of the era's seminal directors. In particular, the "Sixties" saw the return of the auteur, as people like Francis Ford Coppola and Stanley Kubrick wrote and directed their own screenplays, while Woody Allen wrote, directed an ...
    Related: film, sixties, space odyssey, short history, lenses
  • French New Wave - 1,238 words
    French New Wave The French New Wave was a movement that lasted between 1959 to 1964. It all started with the Cinematheque Francois, an underground organization that would regularly show older films from around the world. This beget the cine-club, and by the 1954 there were 100,000 members in 200 clubs. From these clubs several magazines were created, the most famous of these were LEcran Francois, La Revue du Cinema, Postif, and the world known Cahiers du Cinema. One of the two most influential people during this time was Alexandre Astruc who declared that, the cinema is becoming a means of expression like the other arts before it, especially painting and the novel. It is no longer a spectacl ...
    Related: wave, german expressionism, love story, francois truffaut, nazi
  • Gang Culture Has Increasingly Become A Subculture For Many Teenage Youths Main Minority Teens, These Social Outcast Are Often - 1,054 words
    Gang Culture has increasingly become a subculture for many teenage youths. Main minority teens, these social outcast are often have no real economic stability and no parental supervision or guidance. As a result, teenagers often rebel and seek comfort in gangs. These gangs provide what is lacking in their lives, a sense of belonging. Minorities are often stereotyped and criticized, especially minorities born into poverty. They are condemned simply because they are not of the same race or of the same class as the majority (often middle class whites). Before these minorities can even prove themselves equal, society already pushes them towards the subculture that has risen out of oppression and ...
    Related: gang, minority, outcast, social norms, subculture, teenage
  • Gangsta Rap - 756 words
    Gangsta Rap Gangsta rap is a form of expression which uses words with rhythmic beats to make one point or another. What separates gangsta rap from regular rap is that gangsta rap talks about gang life and rap usually doesn't. Lyrics in gangsta rap that cause the most controversy are the ones that talk about killing people or ones that portray woman as just objects. People like Delores Tucker and William Bennett are currently trying to censor these "filthy" lyrics because they believe that these lyrics corrupt minds. But even though gangsta rappers like Tupac Shakur and "Biggie Smalls" might rap about hurting women or killing people, they are not to be blamed for what people do regardless of ...
    Related: gangsta, more important, los angeles, black women, tupac
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