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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: amnesia

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  • Amnesia And Its Causes - 1,104 words
    Amnesia And Its Causes Amnesia, the partial or complete loss of memory, most commonly is temporary and for only a short span of experience. There are both organic and psychological causes for amnesia. Some organic causes include inflammation of the brain, head injury, or stroke. This type of memory loss occurs suddenly and can last a long time. The person may be able to recall events in the distant past but not yesterday or today. If the amnesia is caused by alcohol abuse, it is a progressive disorder, and there are usually neurological problems like uncoordinated movements and loss of feeling in the fingers and toes. Once these problems occur, it may be too late to stop drinking. In contras ...
    Related: amnesia, huntington's disease, memory loss, early childhood, daniel
  • Agatha Christie: Queen Of The Mystery Genre - 1,400 words
    Agatha Christie: Queen Of The Mystery Genre Agatha Christie: Queen of the Mystery Genre Agatha Mary Clarissa Miller was born to Mr. and Mrs. Fred Miller of Torquay, Devon, England. Researchers debate on the year in which she was born, but it was September 15 in either 1890 or 1891. Her father was an American who lived with his British wife in Torquay. At the time, her parents did not realize that their daughter would one day become a famous English author, writing an insatiable amount of novels and plays. Her focus was mainly on the mystery genre of literature. She was married two times, and bore one daughter by her first husband. In 1971, five years before her death, Christie was given the ...
    Related: agatha, agatha christie, genre, murder mystery, mystery, queen
  • Alcoholism - 1,581 words
    Alcoholism Alcoholism is a disease of epidemic proportions, affecting 9.3 to 10 million Americans, and many professionals believe the figures are closer to 20 million (Weddle and Wishon). Alcoholism is a "physiological or physiological dependence on alcohol characterized by the alcoholics inability to control the start or termination of his drinking"(Encyclopedia Britannica 210). It consists of frequent and recurring consumption of alcohol to an extent that causes continued harm to the drinker and leads to medical and social problems. Alcoholism, however, does not merely cause harm to the alcoholic, but to the entire family as well, affecting an estimated 28 million children in this country ...
    Related: alcoholism, high school, human beings, social problems, fail
  • Battered Womens Syndrome: A Survey Of Contemporary Theories In 1991, Governor William Weld Modified Parole Regulations And Pe - 1,755 words
    ... s theory, explaining help organizations are too overwhelmed and limited in their resources to be effective and therefore do not try as hard as they should to help victims. Whatever the case may be, the researchers argue that we can better understand the plight of the battered woman by asking did she seek help and what happened when she did, rather than why didn't she leave. Because the survivor theory of learned helplessness attributes the battered woman's plight to ineffective help sources and societal indifference, a logical solution would entail increased funding for programs in place and educating the public about the symptoms and consequences of domestic violence. There are battered ...
    Related: battered women, contemporary, governor, modified, parole, survey, weld
  • Bizarre Elements Of Dreams - 1,745 words
    Bizarre Elements Of Dreams BIZARRE ELEMENTS IN DREAMS, DAYDREAMS AND WAKING NARRATIVES Imogen Nightingale ABSTRACT In this Experiment, eighty-eight subjects were asked to individually recall and transcribe dreams and daydreams over a one-week period. It was also requested that they note anything prominent that had happened to them over that week. Results worksheets were the filled out and data was handed in for analysis. The hypothesis was to test Hobson & McCartley's activation-synthesis hypothesis that dreams would have more bizarreness than other waking narratives, Our results, however, failed to support this, instead showing a higher significance of bizarreness when daydreaming, and supp ...
    Related: dreams, information processing, waking life, blonde hair, whilst
  • Critically Consider Whether Evidence Justifies A Distiction Between Stm And Ltm - 832 words
    Critically Consider Whether Evidence Justifies A Distiction Between Stm And Ltm Diane Woodward 10th September 1999 Critically consider whether evidence justifies a distinction between STM and LTM Memory is a working process that enables us to learn and benefit from past experience. There are three stages of process, registration, storage and retrieval. Some Psychologists have undertaken research to show there is a distinction between STM and LTM. Atkinson and Shiffrin introduced the Multi Store Model that supports the fact that the STM and the LTM are different. The LTM is a permanent store while the STM is only temporary. The Multi Store Model proposes that information must pass through the ...
    Related: critically, brain injury, long term memory, short term, woodward
  • Date Rape - 652 words
    Date Rape Date Rape drugs Rohypnol and GHB - Tell a true story about rape then INTRODUCTION: Can you imagine this happening to you? Most of you probably cant. Today rape is higher than ever before because of date rape drugs. I know that most of you men think that it couldnt happen to you, well dont be nieve. When date rape drugs are involved, anyone is susceptible to being a victim. The two most widely used date rape drugs are Rohypnol and GHB, and there are things that you should know about protecting yourself as well as others. MAIN POINT 1: ROHYPNOL The main date rape drug is Rohypnol; it is also know as Roofies. It is similar to Valium, but ten times more powerful. Rohypnol is illegal in ...
    Related: date rape, rape, public safety, main point, club
  • Dissociative Identity Disorder - 910 words
    Dissociative Identity Disorder Max Denis April 28, 2000 From the Diagnosis and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, dissociative identity disorder (DID) is recognized as the presence of two or more distinct identities or personality states that recurrently take control of the behavior. There is an inability to recall important personal information, the extent of which is too great to be explained by ordinary forgetfulness (1994). It is a kind of amnesia that repressed all the traumatic memories most of the time lived during childhood. The most frequent traumatisms that cause this disorder are the sexual abuse. The alter personalities are created to cope with intolerable abuse. They are ch ...
    Related: anxiety disorder, disorder, dissociative, dissociative identity, dissociative identity disorder, eating disorder, identity disorder
  • False Memory - 1,545 words
    ... traced back to Plato's various beliefs about the eidos. (Forms of reality which were variously described by Plato but always were held up as 'more real' than the world of sense experience which, in some way, was always held up as inferior to and dependant on the eidos.) The Platonic Model avoids the problem of determining whether or not a memory is accurate by claiming that the memory is not of a personal experience at all. It also confuses several types of mental states. It completely blurs the distinction between dream states and conscious states by eliminating the difference between remembering a sense experience one actually had and remembering a sense experience one never actually ...
    Related: false memory, long term memory, long-term memory, harvard university, psychiatric association
  • From The Dream To The Womb - 1,355 words
    From The Dream To The Womb From the Dream to the Womb: Visionary Impulse and Political Ambivalence in The Great Gatsby It seems hard to believe in our period, when a three-decade lurch to the political Right has anathematized the word, but F. Scott Fitzgerald once, rather fashionably, believed himself to be a socialist. Some years before, he had also, less fashionably, tried hard to think himself a Catholic. While one hardly associates the characteristic setting of Fitzgerald's novels, his chosen kingdom of the sybaritic fabulous, with either proletarian solidarity or priestly devotions, it will be the argument of this essay that a tension between Left and religiose perspectives structures t ...
    Related: dream, womb, roaring twenties, greek philosophy, largely
  • Ghb - 564 words
    GHB Let American Consumer Counseling Help you Get Out of Debt! GHB GHB, or gamma hydroxybutyrate, is a central nervous system depressant which can relax or sedate the body that is usually given in a clear liquid form that looks just like water and is usually found in small bottles, like empty Visine bottles, Gatorade bottles, or old water bottles. GHB can also come in the form of a light-colored power, which you mix into soda, alcohol, or water. GHB is relatively cheap, $5-$10 dollars a capful or teaspoonful, and the intoxicating effects usually takes place within 10 to 20 minutes, lasting up to 4 hours, depending on the amount of GHB taken. Theres very little information about GHBs effects ...
    Related: nervous system, date rape, central nervous, ecstasy
  • Hypoglycemia - 496 words
    Hypoglycemia subject = Human Anatomy title = Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia means low blood sugar or low fuel in the blood. It also refers to a distubed carbohydrate metabolism, since some people change between high and low blood sugar levels. When the body tries to work under these conditions, mental processes are impaired and body systems are broken. Hypoglycemia is sometimes related to other conditions like drug addiction, alcoholism, allergies, arthritis, diabetes, mental illness, anti-social behavio, an juvenile deliquency. There are numerous causes of hypoglycemia including; inborn errors of metabolism, defects in enzyme systsms, disorders of various glands and organs (hypothalamus, pituita ...
    Related: hypoglycemia, nervous system, human anatomy, blood sugar, alcohol
  • Infantile Amenisia - 747 words
    Infantile Amenisia Our brains are constantly at work processing and retrieving information. However, we become frustrated when we cannot readily retrieve information that we have stored in our brains. The inability to remember can occur for a number of reasons that range from simple forgetting to phenomena like Infantile Amnesia. Infantile Amnesia is described as an adults inability to remember events before the age of two or three. This phenomena has proven difficult to test because your memory is in a constant state of reconstruction, (Rupp, 1998, p. 171). That is your memories are influenced by past events, and current perceptions about yourself. Therefore, you may remember events only in ...
    Related: rivers press, long term memory, grown children, hill, recall
  • Injuries In Sports - 1,280 words
    Injuries In Sports Despite the high prevalence and potentially serious outcomes associated with concussion in athletes, there is little systematic research examining risk factors and short- and long-term outcomes. Objectives To assess the relationship between concussion history and learning disability (LD) and the association of these variables with neuropsychological performance and to evaluate postconcussion recovery in a sample of college football players. Design, Setting, and Participants A total of 393 athletes from 4 university football programs across the United States received preseason baseline evaluations between May 1997 and February 1999. Subjects who had subsequent football-rela ...
    Related: sports, sports medicine, american college, learning disability, cumulative
  • Insomnia - 1,446 words
    Insomnia Lying among tousled sheets, eluded by sleep with thoughts racing, many people wrestle with the nightly demon named insomnia. Insomnia is defined as, the perception or complaint of inadequate or poor-quality sleep because of one or more of the following: difficulty falling asleep, waking up frequently during the night with difficulty returning to sleep, waking up too early in the morning, or unrefreshing sleep (Rajput 1431). Because the definition of "poor-quality sleep" is not the same for every person, it is not easy to determine the frequency and severity of it's occurrence (Holbrook 216). To add to the complexity of this problem, there is not even one universal treatment that can ...
    Related: insomnia, cognitive therapy, biological clock, short term, falling
  • Interview With Toni Morrison - 571 words
    Interview With Toni Morrison I'm interested in the way in which the past affects the present and I think that if we understand a good deal more about history, we automatically understand a great more about contemporary life. Also, there's more of the past for imaginative purposes than there is of the future. Q. Beloved is dedicated to the 60 million who died as a result of slavery. A staggering number -- is this proved historically? A. Some historians told me 200 million died. The smallest number I got from anybody was 60 million. There were travel accounts of people who were in the Congo -- that's a wide river -- saying, ''We could not get the boat through the river, it was choked with bodi ...
    Related: interview, morrison, toni, toni morrison, slave ship
  • Man Who Mistook His Wife For Hat - 768 words
    Man Who Mistook His Wife For Hat Men ought to know that from nothing else but the brain come joys, delights, laughter and sports, and sorrows, griefs despondency, and lamentations. And by this, in an especial manner, we acquire wisdom and knowledge, and see and hear and know what are foul and what are fair, what are bad and what are good, what are sweet and what are unsavory......And by the same organ we become mad and delirious, and fears and terrors assail us... All these things we endure from the brain when it is not healthy... In these ways I am of the opinion that the brain exercises the greatest power in the man. --Hippocrates, "On the Sacred Disease" (4th century B.C) "It is human nat ...
    Related: panic attacks, personal identity, neurological disorders, comprehend, frequent
  • Mental Disorders - 1,868 words
    Mental Disorders There are many diseases and disorders that may affect the human mind. Some of these are serious, while others are minor and may not even be noticed. Some of the disorders and diseases to be covered in this report are delirium, dementia, and schizophrenia, also a discussion of specific symptoms and treatments available for the different disorders. A mental illness is defined as any disease that affects a person's mind, thoughts, emotions, personality, or behavior. For any mental illness, as in a physical illness, there are symptoms that make it possible to identify when a person is suffering from a mental disorder or illness. Some of the more common symptoms of these disorder ...
    Related: affective disorder, anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder, compulsive disorder, disorders, dissociative disorders, eating disorders
  • Movies And Books - 1,595 words
    Movies And Books Many people compare an English literary work to different movies of their time. An example of this is Pygmalion by Bernard Shaw. A story about a woman transformed into a spectacular beauty pushed into royalty, but never loses her identity, is very similar to a movie directed by Don Bluth called Anastasia. Bernard Shaws play Pygmalion and Don Bluths movie Anastasia, show that one can change a persons appearance, but the person deep within has never left the surface. The two have a large array of similarities and differences. What is also fascinating is that the background of both the English writer and director are very similar in how they began. I will compare both movie wor ...
    Related: movies, young university, bernard shaw, robin hood, woman
  • Multilple Personality Disorders - 1,326 words
    Multilple Personality Disorders Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD) or Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) was first recognized in the 1700's but was not understood so therefore it was forgotten. Many cases show up in medical records through the years, but in 1905, Dr. Morton Prince wrote a book about MPD that is a foundation for the disorder. A few years after it was published Sigmund Freud dismissed the disorder and this dropped it from being discussed at any credible mental health meetings. Since then the disorder has been overlooked and misdiagnosed as either schizophrenia or psychosis. Many in the medical profession did not believe that a person could unknowingly have more than one per ...
    Related: disorders, dissociative identity disorder, identity disorder, mental disorder, multiple personality disorder, personality, personality disorder
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