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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: freshwater

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  • Freshwater Regions - 1,507 words
    Freshwater Regions Freshwater is defined as having a low salt concentrationusually less than 1%. Plants and animals in freshwater regions are adjusted to the low salt content and would not be able to survive in areas of high salt concentration (i.e, ocean). There are different types of freshwater regions: ponds and lakes, streams and rivers, and wetlands. The following sections describe the characteristics of these three freshwater zones. Ponds and Lakes These regions range in size from just a few square meters to thousands of square kilometers. Scattered throughout the earth, several are remnants from the Pleistocene glaciation. Many ponds are seasonal, lasting just a couple of months (such ...
    Related: freshwater, plant species, barrier reef, sea anemones, crucial
  • Freshwater Resources: Tapped Out By Peter Gleick - 1,173 words
    Freshwater Resources: Tapped Out By Peter Gleick The article being discussed was entitled Tapped Out and was written by Peter Gleick. It focuses on the depleting supply of our Earth's freshwater resources. How it effects the human population, and how the problem will develop in years to come. The question being asked is will we be able to sustain enough freshwater to satisfy all the world's needs? And what will we do about the present lack of clean freshwater in many underdeveloped countries all around the world. The reason why is quite obvious. We need to reevaluate our distribution of freshwater, and find a way to conserve and preserve it for generations to come. An astounding half of the ...
    Related: freshwater, peter, latin america, drinking water, solve
  • A Lesson From Oliver - 5,155 words
    A Lesson From Oliver by David Jorgensen Like any other morning I was up at four, the day Oliver met with his violent death. At four in the morning the grass is wet. Now, it's still wet at 6 a.m. and even at seven, and these tend to be the hours of choice for most people wishing to appreciate the phenomenon of grass wetness. But it's a tragedy of economics that, when work starts at 5 a.m., one is not afforded the same time-options for grass appreciation as members of the sane world. Nor was this tragedy confined to my having to appreciate the wet grass while in a metabolic state more suited to hibernation. Four a.m. was my only chance to absorb all of northern Ontario's summer morning treasur ...
    Related: lesson, oliver, decision making, prime minister, initiated
  • Acid Rain - 999 words
    ... an affect the fish in the water in two ways: directly and indirectly. Sulfuric acid directly interferes with the fish's ability to take in salt, oxygen and nutrients crucial for daily life. Osmoregulation is the process of maintaining the delicate balance of salts and minerals in their tissues. For freshwater fish, maintaining osmoregulation is key in their survival. Acid molecules, which are a result of acid rain in the water, cause mucus to form in the fishs gills. This in return prevents the fish from absorbing oxygen. If the fish are unable to absorb oxygen, the consequence could be the eventual suffocation of fish and the low pH could throw off the balance of salts in the fish tissu ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, new media, modern society
  • Acid Rain - 995 words
    ... ish in the water in two ways: directly and indirectly. Sulfuric acid directly interferes with the fish's ability to take in salt, oxygen and nutrients crucial for daily life. Osmoregulation is the process of maintaining the delicate balance of salts and minerals in their tissues. For freshwater fish, maintaining osmoregulation is key in their survival. Acid molecules, which are a result of acid rain in the water, cause mucus to form in the fishs gills. This in return prevents the fish from absorbing oxygen. If the fish are unable to absorb oxygen, the consequence could be the eventual suffocation of fish and the low pH could throw off the balance of salts in the fish tissue. Salt levels ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, modern society, staying alive
  • Acid Rain - 1,774 words
    Acid Rain What is acid rain? Acid rain is the term for pollution caused when sulfur and nitrogen dioxides combine with atmospheric moisture. The term 'acid rain' is slightly misleading, and would be more accurate if deemed 'enhanced acid rain', as rain occurs acidic naturally. Acidity is measured on what is know as the pH scale. Fourteen is the most basic, seven is the most neutral, and zero is the most acidic. Pure rain has a pH level of 7, which is exactly neutral. The acidity of rain is determined by the pH of pure water in reaction with atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, resulting in carbonic acid. These particles partly dissociate to produce hydrogen ions and bicarbonate ions ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, electric utilities, major change
  • Acid Rain - 1,731 words
    Acid Rain Introduction: What Causes Acid Rain? One of the main causes of acid rain is sulfur dioxide. Natural sources, which emit this gas, are Volcanoes, sea spray, rotting vegetation and plankton. However, the burning of fossil fuels, such as Coal and oil, are largely to be blamed for approximately half of the emissions of this gas in the world. When sulfur dioxide reaches the atmosphere, it oxidizes to first form a sulfate ion. It then Becomes sulfuric acid as it joins with hydrogen atoms in the air and falls back down to earth. Oxidation occurs the most in clouds and especially in heavily polluted air where other compounds such as ammonia and ozone help to catalyze the reaction, changing ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, case study, ohio river
  • Acid Rains - 540 words
    Acid Rains Acid rain refers to all types of precipitation--rain, snow, sleet, hail, fog--that is acidic in nature. Acidic means that these forms of water have a pH lower than the 5.6 average of rainwater. Acid rain kills aquatic life, trees, crops and other vegetation, damages buildings and monuments, corrodes copper and lead piping, damages such man-made things as automobiles, reduces soil fertility and can cause toxic metals to leach into underground drinking water sources. Rain is naturally acidic because carbon dioxide, found normally in the earth's atmosphere, reacts with water to form carbonic acid. While "pure" rain's acidity is pH 5.6-5.7, actual pH readings vary from place to place ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, carbon dioxide, bodies of water, dioxide
  • Air Pollutin In Bratislava - 1,084 words
    Air Pollutin In Bratislava SLOVAKIA Name of Ministry/Office: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Slovak Republic, Department of International Economic Cooperation Date: 7 January, 1997 Economic Cooperation Dr. Jan Varso, Charg d' Affaires Mailing address: Stromov 1, 833, 36 Bratislava, Slovakia Telephone: 42-7-3704 214 Telefax: 42-7-372 326 Note from the Secretariat: An effort has been made to present all country profiles within a common format, with an equal number of pages. However, where Governments have not provided information for the tables appended to Chapters 4 and 17, those tables have been omitted entirely in order to reduce the overall length of the profile and save paper. Conseque ...
    Related: pest management, international council, monetary fund, transfer, drought
  • Aquaculture - 1,393 words
    Aquaculture Aquaculture is the farming of aquatic organisms in fresh, or salt water. A wide variety of aquatic organisms are produced through aquaculture, including fish, crustaceans, mollusks, algae, and aquatic plants. Unlike capture fisheries, aquaculture requires deliberate human intervention in the organisms' productivity and results in yields that exceed those from the natural environment alone. Stocking water with (juvenile organisms), fertilizing the water, feeding the organisms, and maintaining water quality are common examples of such intervention. Most aquacultural crops are destined for human consumption. However, aquaculture also produces bait fishes, ornamental or aquarium fish ...
    Related: aquaculture, thermal energy, natural environment, atlantic coast, concrete
  • Biomes Of The World - 1,092 words
    ... trees. The rain forest contains over 50% of worlds population in plants and animals. It covers roughly 5 billion acres of land. There are 3 layers of trees that can be found there. The first and most top layer is the emergent, which are widely spaced trees 100-120 ft tall with canopies above the general canopy of the forest. The second, middle layer is a closed canopy of 80-foot trees. Here light is available to this layer, but blocks out the light of lower lays. The third layer is a closed canopy of 60-foot trees. This is where little air movement occurs and there is high humidity. Another lower layer is the shrub/sapling layer. In this place of the forest less than 3% of light reaches ...
    Related: north america, south america, northern africa, tree, continuous
  • Dinosaurs Extinction - 1,537 words
    Dinosaurs Extinction The first question that must be posed when trying to crack the mystery of the mass extinction is to ask, throughout history were there any other occurences of this magnitude? The answer is a resounding yes. Altogether over time there has been about eight mass extinctions to large land dwelling vertebrates. The most recent was about ten thousand years ago, killing most of the giant mammals like mammoths, mastodons, super-large camels, saber-toothed tigers, and others (Bakker 428). The second question, is whether or not these mass extinctions follow a pattern? Once again the answer is yes. Every time a mass extinction occurs on the land ecosystem, the oceanic system is hur ...
    Related: dinosaurs, extinction, mass extinction, volcanic eruptions, new zealand
  • Dolphins Of The Amazon River: How Sotalia Fluviatilis And Inia Geoffrensis Coexist In Their Habitat - 1,049 words
    Dolphins Of The Amazon River: How Sotalia Fluviatilis And Inia Geoffrensis Coexist In Their Habitat Kristi Simpson Biosc 491-14/Tropical Biology April, 1999 Dr. E. Pivorun Dolphins of the Amazon River: How Sotalia fluviatilis and Inia geoffrensis coexist in their habitat The Amazon River and its lush, beautiful forest are surely among the most amazing ecosystems in the world. The ever-present, primordial cacophony that echoed in my ears as I stood breathlessly watching saddle-backed tamarins (Saguinus fuscicollis) leap from tree to tree is what I will forever crave to hear again. As a biology student, I have always read about the great biodiversity of the neotropics, as the importance of hab ...
    Related: amazon, amazon river, coexist, dolphins, habitat
  • Economics Of Aquaculture United States - 1,436 words
    Economics Of Aquaculture United States Economics of Aquaculture United States Aquaculture is the fastest growing agricultural industry in the United States. In 1990, there were over 100 species cultured; eight species accounted for approximately 70% of total culture, with over 3400 aquaculture operations in the United States. This trend is driven by increased demand for fisheries product and reduced yield from traditional fisheries landings (National Research Council, 1982). Given the increased demand, there is a significant potential for job creation in an expanded aquacultural industry. The estimated U.S. Total Aquaculture Production (including freshwater) has more than doubled from 139,88 ...
    Related: aquaculture, economic development, economic value, economics, modern economics, northeastern united states, united states trade
  • England Latin Anglia, Political Division Of The Island Of Great Britain, Constituting, With Wales, The Principal Division Of - 4,616 words
    England (Latin Anglia), political division of the island of Great Britain, constituting, with Wales, the principal division of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. England occupies all of the island east of Wales and south of Scotland, another division of the United Kingdom. Established as an independent monarchy many centuries ago, England in time achieved political control over the rest of the island, all the British Isles, and vast sections of the world, becoming the nucleus of one of the greatest empires in history. The capital, largest city, and chief port of England is London, with a population (1991 preliminary) of 6,378,600. It is also the capital of Great Britai ...
    Related: church of england, division, great britain, latin, principal, southern england
  • Euthanasia - 1,167 words
    Euthanasia Opium- an addictive drug originally used as a painkiller. It is obtained from the unripe seeds of the opium poppy and can be made into substances that a person can smoke causing relaxation, alleviated anxiety, and a state of euphoria. Continued use of the drug also induces deterioration to the mind and body of a person eventually causing death. The substance was therefore stated illegal in China during the late 18th Century yet consistently smuggled into the country via British merchant ships. As the Chinese placed more restrictions on trade in an effort to abolish the importation of opium, the battle against the drug raged on until war was unavoidable between England and China. I ...
    Related: euthanasia, legal issues, mind and body, coast guard, replaced
  • Florida Panther - 1,744 words
    Florida Panther As the deer fed at the marsh's edge, it's tail flickering as it nibbled tender and ripe green growth. Then the nervous animal pauses in it's feeding and lifted its head to listen. Whatever hint of danger the deer had sensed was ignored once the threat could not be located. It stamped a forefoot, lowered its head and began to eat once more, this deer had failed to detect a Florida panther that was downwind (going into the wind) crouched low in the underbrush. Amber eyes however, estimated the distance between himself and the deer. Then at the right moment attacked the deer, with bounds at over twenty feet at a time the panther exploded out of the underbrush pouncing on the dee ...
    Related: florida, florida legislature, panther, south florida, recovery plan
  • Forests Extinction - 1,777 words
    Forests Extinction Can you picture our earth without forests? Many of us cant. Forests cover approximately one fifth of the worlds land surface and play an important role in our everyday lives (Dudley 4). Forests provide us with many products and services from helping maintain erosion to providing jobs for our citizens. Humanity depends on the survival of a healthy ecosystem and deforestation is causing many social, economic and ecological problems. One ecological problem is Global warming witch is caused when carbon is released into the air after the burning of forests. Governments and industries must become more aware of these consequences of their activities and change accordingly. They n ...
    Related: extinction, forest ecosystems, forest management, national forests, environmental change
  • Hardness Of Water - 1,127 words
    Hardness Of Water Water is the most important molecule that exists on the Earth. Without water living beings would not be able to live. Water is used for an immeasurable number of things. There are many properties of water, which makes this molecule so unique. One which people overlook is hardness. Hardness is defined in the Chemistry: The Central Science by Prentice Hall's as being "water that contains a relatively high concentration of Ca2+, Mg2+, and other divalent cations." Water containing these ions is not a health hazard; however, it is a problem for industries and households. Therefore, the hardness of water is vital to understand in order to prevent the problems it could cause. For ...
    Related: hardness, water table, experimental procedure, prentice hall, ions
  • Hopewell Culture - 1,813 words
    Hopewell Culture Studied since the discovery of the conspicuous mounds in Ross County Ohio, the Hopewell have been an archaeological enigma to many. The tradition is so named for the owner of the farm, Captain Hopewell, where over thirty mounds were discovered. Earlier studies focused more on the exotic grave goods such as precious metals, freshwater pearls, many of these objects had come from all corners of the continent from the Rocky Mountains to the Gulf of Mexico, and north to the mid-Atlantic coastline (some say Hopewellian influence reached Nova Scotia). Earlier scholars of the Hopewell (1950s through 1960s) were well aware of the influence of the "Interaction Sphere", yet concluded t ...
    Related: hopewell, food sources, technological innovation, north america, harbor
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