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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: free state

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  • A Gold Rush Leads To War - 1,304 words
    A Gold Rush Leads to War A Gold Rush Leads to War The American Civil War (1861-1865) and the Reconstruction period that followed were the bloodiest chapters of American history to date. Brother fought brother as the population was split along sectional lines. The issue of slavery divided the nation's people and the political parties that represented them in Washington. The tension which snapped the uneasy truce between north and south began building over slavery and statehood debates in California. In 1848, settlers discovered gold at Sutter's Mill, starting a mass migration. By 1849, California had enough citizens to apply for statehood. However, the debate over whether the large western st ...
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  • Abe Lincoln - 1,112 words
    ... him from the chores Lincoln attended ABC school.10 This is where Lincoln learned to become a hard worker. Lincolns working days started in 1831. Abe and his brother were hired to build a boat and float it down the Mississippi with a load of cargo on it. The boat was headed towards New Orleans and this is where Lincoln saw his first, but not last, slave auction. Lincoln is quoted in saying, if I ever got a chance to hit that thing, I would hit it hard. 11 Lincoln was not in favor of slavery but he was certainly to abolitionist. Lincolns career in politics began in the spring of 1832, when Lincoln was 23, he ran for a seat on the Illinois House of Representatives. In his campaign, Lincoln ...
    Related: abe lincoln, lincoln, interest rate, republican party, auction
  • Adventures Of Huck Finn - 1,238 words
    Adventures Of Huck Finn Ever since it was written, Mark Twains Huckleberry Finn has been a novel that many people have found disturbing. Although some argue that the novel is extremely racist, careful reading will prove just the opposite. In recent years especially, there has been an increasing debate over what some will call the racist ideas in the novel. In some cases the novel has even been banned by public school systems and censored by public libraries. The basis for the debate is how Jim, a black slave and one of the main characters, is depicted. However, if one was to look at the underlying themes in the novel, they would realize that it is not racist and could even be considered an a ...
    Related: finn, huck, huck finn, huckleberry finn, public school
  • Adventures Of Huck Finn And History - 1,350 words
    Adventures Of Huck Finn And History The world in which we live in now is much less oppressive than say the world lived in the middle of the 1800s. Up until the Civil War, the South depended on their peculiar institution of slavery, in order to be productive a successful. Most people believed slavery was not wrong, but those who thought otherwise seldom tried to alter it. In general if surrounded by oppressive environment, one does not usually try to make a difference in that world. This is because people are afraid to defend what is right against a whole mass of people who believe otherwise. Huck Finn in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Billy Budd in Billy Budd, and Frederick Douglass in ...
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  • American Identity - 1,828 words
    American Identity The American Identity It can strongly be argued, as it has for many years, whether or not an American identity ever occurred between 1776 and 1861. The answer to this question really depends on your definition of what an identity consists of. An identity is the sameness in all that constitutes the objective reality of a thing; oneness. The thirteen colonies tried hard to find a sense of themselves as a nation even before they had a nation. Nationality became an American invention (notes). To find an identity the thirteen colonies created a flag, symbols of nationality (bald eagle, pluribus Unum), and they established national heroes (George Washington). Next they began to s ...
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  • Bible About Muhammad - 3,310 words
    Bible About Muhammad "Say: 'Do you see whether this message be from Allah (God Almighty), and yet you reject it, and a witness from among the Children of Israel bore witness of one like him.' " (the Holy Quran 46:10) Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen, The subject of this evening's talk - "What the Bible says about Muhammad" will no doubt come as a surprise to many of you because the speaker is a Muslim. How does it come about that a Muslim happens to be expounding prophecies from the Jewish and Christian Scriptures? As a young man, about 30 years ago, I attended a series of religious lectures by a Christian theologian, a certain Rev. Hiten, at the "Theater Royal", Durban in South Africa. Po ...
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  • Bolsheviks In 1920 - 1,777 words
    ... rences between themselves and the Russians (p. 80). In 1918, near the end of World War I, forces from the United States, France, and Britain gathered in Russia to "expand the eastern front" against the Germans (p. 84). The purpose of these interventions at first was to use Russian soil to win World War I, not to support either side of an ideological civil war that had just begun and was occurring simultaneously (p. 84). Before Russia made several questionable decisions in World War I, the ideology behind the Bolshevik regime was not challenged heavily by the west (Harris). Ulam states, "Until November 1918, the Allied intervention in Russia had nothing ideological about it. It was design ...
    Related: bolsheviks, social order, russian state, civil war, kiev
  • Bolsheviks In Wwi - 1,759 words
    Bolsheviks In Wwi There were several major sources of conflict between the Bolsheviks and the western states in Europe from 1917 to 1921. Conflicting ideologies that each attacked the core of each other's respective society led to the notion that Capitalism and Communism could not coexist. The attempts of both actors to hold control of their own political system and to expand their political ideas internationally led to major conflicts between them. Also, the lack of respect for the upstart of the Bolshevik government by the west led to misperceptions concerning the actions of the Soviets. Russia's unsatisfactory involvement World War I and its abrupt departure from the war, which affected t ...
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  • Bolsheviks In Wwi - 1,714 words
    ... states of the west began to take notice of the ideological differences between themselves and the Russians . In 1918, near the end of WWI, forces from the United States, France, and Britain gathered in Russia to "expand the eastern front" against the Germans . The purpose of these interventions at first was to use Russian soil to win WWI, not to support either side of the ideological civil war that had just begun and was occurring simultaneously . Before Russia made several questionably decisions in WWI, the ideology behind the Bolshevik regime was not challenged heavily by the west. Ulam states, "Until November 1918, the Allied intervention in Russia had nothing ideological about it. It ...
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  • Civil War - 3,706 words
    ... iority. They also feared competition from freed slaves for their trades. The economic viability of slavery is a debatable issue. Slavery as an efficient labor system was not feasible, as the slaves did not have enough compulsion to do more than would be extracted from them by force. Slavery made the souths economic system less flexible and progressive. The success of plantation agriculture hindered the growth of a more diversified economy. The reluctance of white men to work as a free labor force due to the social stigma attached to it meant that the economy never progressed beyond the rural character to industrialization uniformly. Huge profits were made by businessmen at the expense of ...
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  • Civil War In Us - 402 words
    Civil War In US The annexation of Texas to the United States and the gain of new territory by the Treaty of Guadeloupe Hidalgo aggravated the hostility between the North and South. The controversial issue of slavery in the new territories arose again along with many other political differences that needed to be resolved. In the midst of fear that the southern states might withdraw from the Union altogether, Senator Henry Clay of Kentucky created a series of five legislative enactments. These enactments, known as the Compromise of 1850, answer the question of whether slavery was to be sanctioned or prohibited in the newly acquired regions. The first two measures included the admission of Cali ...
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  • Civil War Inevitability - 1,220 words
    Civil War Inevitability THE INEVITABILITY OF THE BREAKUP OF THE UNION By Sam Tooker The breakup of the Union was inevitable. The south was always going to secede; it was just a question of when. The southern and northern states varied on many issues. There were deep economic, social, and political differences between the north and the south. All of this was a different interpretation of the United States Constitution on both sides. In the end, all of these disagreements led to the Civil War. There were reasons other than slavery for the souths secession.(5) The south relied heavily on agriculture, as opposed to the north which was highly populated by factories. The south grew cotton, which w ...
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  • Constitution - 1,417 words
    Constitution When the Constitution of the United States was first created in 1787, its purpose was to unify our country. However, by 1850, the United States had become 'source of sectional discord and tension and ultimately contributed to the failure of the union it had created.' What happened during the 63 years after it was first established to 'contribute to the failure of the union it had created?' One must look at what the Constitution promoted to make the country unified and what it did to make it disunified. Compromises such as 3/5, the Missouri, and the tariff of 1850 all helped to unify and shape our country. However, compromises such as the Fugitive Slave Law, Popular Sovereignty, ...
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  • Constitution - 1,401 words
    ... to resist the reenslaving a man on the coast of America.' In the flyer created by an abolitionist, it pointed out that man was able to capture free or runaway slaves' to be on the lookout. This flyer had no right to allow whites to kidnap a man due to the color of his skin, free or runaway. Transcendentalists such as Emerson and Thoreau, both supported a variety of reforms, especially the antislavery movement. Emerson's essays argued for self-reliance, independent thinking and the primacy of spiritual, matters over material ones. Thoreau used observations of nature to discover essential truths about life and the universe. The Fugitive Slave Law is definitely a reason why the Constitutio ...
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  • Dredd Scott - 1,212 words
    Dredd Scott Dredd Scott America in 1857 was a nation on the brink. Relationship between the North and South had been strained for decades and was only getting worse. All tension had to do with the issues of slavery. In 1848 the U.S. had acquired new lands in the Mexican cession, and the debate was on. The question was whether or not the South should be allowed to spread slavery into the new states. This debate turned violent many times. The South threatened to secede from the Union if a candidate from the Republican party, who was antislavery, won. Amidst all of the tension would emerge a slave named Dredd Scott. Dredd Scott was a slave to Dr. John Emerson in St.Louis, Missouri a slave state ...
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  • Easter Rising Of 1916 - 398 words
    Easter Rising Of 1916 The events of Easter Monday, the 24th of April, 1916 triggered a bloody confrontation that would have important ramifications both for the Irish people and the British Empire. What would later become known as the Easter Rising was an attempt to end British rule in Ireland. At the onset of the First World War in 1914 the Irish Home Rule Bill was suspended, returning the Irish people to direct rule by the British government. This was viewed as a slap in the face by many in Ireland. It became the primary source of tension between the Royal Irish Constabulary, an armed police force appointed by the British Crown, and opposing rebel groups. The Royal Irish Constabulary consi ...
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  • How The English Won The Boer War In South Africa - 1,798 words
    How The English Won The Boer War In South Africa Fleming 01James M. Fleming22 March, 2001How Great Britain won the Boer War in South Africa in 1902 On October 11, 1899, the forces of the Boer republics, Orange Free State and South African Republic, responded to Great Britain's dismissal of an ultimatum against the placement and reinforcing of British troops in South Africa by laying siege to cities in northern Cape Colony occupied by the then outnumbered British troops. The British were able to gain superiority and eventually win the Boer War by brute force, vastly superior numbers and the cessation of rights for those deemed the enemy and its collaborators. It would take three years and dra ...
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  • How The English Won The Boer War In South Africa - 1,799 words
    ... hundred twenty billion pounds. In February of 1900, the British army was able to gain forward momentum with a series of victories that mark the second phase of the war, the phase of British domination. In short order they were able to relieve the city of Kimberley and seven days later Kitchener was able to cut off Cronje and the main body of the retreating Boer army at Paardeberg and force the surrender of over four thousand troops with Cronje being sent to Saint Helena island in the south Atlantic as a prisoner of war. British troops steadily pressed on and by the middle of March had captured Bloemfontein, the capital of the Orange Free State and on the 28th of May the Free State was an ...
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  • Huck Finn Novel Analysis - 998 words
    Huck Finn Novel Analysis I. Setting The story of Huck Finn begins in his hometown of Hannibal, Missouri. Then the setting changes to Jackson Island because Huck decides to run away and live there. After that the setting changes to the Mississippi River and various towns alongside, when Jim and Huck decide they are heading to a state where Jim will be free. The setting immediately reflects the tone of the book because the book is written in a southern dialect and the story is set in the south. The setting is crucial to the actions in the book. If Huck lived in a state where slaves were free, then there would have been no need for Huck and Jim to travel the Mississippi looking for a state wher ...
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  • Ira : Is Force Justified - 1,546 words
    IRA : Is Force Justified? The Irish Republican Army is not justified in using force to achieve its aims because the Irish Republican Army (IRA) represents the minority of the population in Northern Ireland. The IRA also is not justified in using force because using force does not work and it turns their supporters against them. The IRAs goals are political and political rights should be achieved through political methods, not by force. In cases where the majority of the population is not fairly represented in the government and peaceful protests and demonstrations have not been successful, then resorting to armed resistance is justified. For example, in the case of the American Revolution, t ...
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