Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: academic

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  • Academic Effects - 950 words
    Academic Effects In the spring of 1997, Lisa Sharon Cushing and Craig H. Kennedy conducted an experiment to study the academic effects of providing peer support in general education classrooms on students without disabilities. In other words, students were paired with other students and their behavior observed. The study was undertaken to better understand the effects of peer support stratigies of participating students. Three non-disabled students were observed and a baseline measure of academic engagement was taken. Each student was paired to be a peer supporter with a disabled student and that level of behavior was observed. The experimental question states: Does serving as a peer support ...
    Related: academic, negative effect, positive effects, extraneous variables, english class
  • Academic Stress - 1,365 words
    Academic Stress Picture a typical, hard-working student. Each day she recieves multiple assignments to complete for homework. She is involved in several extracurricular activities so she doesnt have much extra time. After sports practice, she struggles home, ladden with books, to begin studying. On a typical evening she has to work diligently for a couple of hours to complete her homework for school the next day. She has a rigorous schedule that includes honors and advanced placement classes so some nights she is forced to stay up very late to keep up with her classes. Other nights she has an extra packet of work to complete for her SAT Prep course. All this work puts a lot of pressure on he ...
    Related: academic, more prone, school students, positive effects, monitor
  • Violence In Our Academic Insitutes - 442 words
    Violence in our Academic Insitutes Young teenagers must get the message that violence will not be tolerated in our academic institutes, that these violent acts will be met with the severest reprimands. Some people believe that enforcing harsher penalties on young offenders is not a good idea as current laws are more effective. Many parents resent the fact that they should be held responsible in many situations. Stricter rules should be placed on young offenders who break the law. Young offenders who commit violent crimes should be tried as adult. Many young offenders feel that they can get away with a slap on the wrist for violent crimes. One in 12 high schoolers is threatened or injured wit ...
    Related: academic, teenage violence, violence, youth violence, solving skills
  • When Studying History, Both In A Professional And Academic - 1,176 words
    When studying history, both in a professional and academic sense, we try to make connections between civilizations and time periods. Historians have attempted to discover universal constants of human nature, a bond that forms from continent to continent, human being to human being. Is there a constant quality that all peoples posses, and is reflected in all civilizations? Indeed, it is extremely difficult to make generalizations about centuries of modern history. To say that something is true of all of history is virtually impossible, as a counter-example exists for just about anything that can be said of any group of civilizations. To say that all religions are spread by violence is equally ...
    Related: academic, studying, south asian, human nature, conversion
  • When Studying History, Both In A Professional And Academic - 1,191 words
    ... has been, throughout the centuries, a relatively tolerant religion. It has never believed in any form of religious genocide, nor had any inquisitions or messianic crusades, as religions of many other parts of the world did. In fact Akbar I of 1556-1605 AD, the third ruler of the Mughal Empire, took the ultimate steps toward tolerance, by marring a Hindu princess, and allowing Hindus a strong role in the government (Ahmad, et. al., 187). The wars that Islam fought have been rather secular, despite the fact that their government often was not. However, the same cannot be said of Christian, Hindu, and Aztec government, all which had strong ties to both violence and conquest, and indeed, whi ...
    Related: academic, studying, twentieth century, indus river, africa
  • 51000 - 994 words
    5/10/00 Globalization and Ideal Landscapes Globalization is a broad term that has several meanings to different factions, cultural Groups and nations. For our purposes globalization refers to the loss of time and space through the rapid development of technologies. It also refers to a world in which all nations and peoples are directly or indirectly connected through the international economy and world politics. This rapid trend toward a globalized world has seen supporters from both the first world financial sectors and the mass producing agricultural sector. Its main detractors have been environmentalists and the indigenous peoples who are adversely affected by the encroaching nature of gl ...
    Related: point of view, computers and the internet, indigenous people, landscape, supporters
  • A Personal Information - 1,287 words
    A. Personal Information Arthur Kornberg (1918-), American biochemist and physician, claims he has never met "a dull enzyme." He has devoted his life to pursuing and purifying these critical protein molecules. His love of science did not spring from a family history rooted in science. He was born on March 3rd, 1918, the son of a sewing machine operator in the sweatshops of the Lower East Side of New York City. His parents, Joseph Aaron Kornberg and Lena Rachel Katz, were immigrant Jews who made great sacrifices to ensure the safety of their family. They had fled Poland, for if they had stayed, they would have been murdered in a German concentration camp. His grandfather had abandoned the pate ...
    Related: personal information, national institute, york city, lincoln high school, spending
  • A Separate Peace Thematic Analysis - 765 words
    A Separate Peace - Thematic Analysis A Separate Peace - Thematic Analysis An analysis of John Knowles A Separate Peace brings up the theme of man's inhumanity to his fellow man. What makes this novel unique is that in protesting war, Knowles never overtly referred to the blood and gore of war; he showed the consequences of war, some paralleling the nature of war and some simply laying out how World War II affected noncombatants thousand miles away. There have been many books written about war, what happens, why it happens, and why wars should stop. Knowles explains through the life of Finny why war never will cease, with only one death in the entire book; a quiet one at that. When Gene is re ...
    Related: separate peace, thematic, thematic analysis, world peace, ideal society
  • A Separate Peace: Chapter 1 - 5,662 words
    ... truth, the shadowy, elusive truth of an instant that is already beginning to fade in memory. Gene is about to make a full confession--or he thinks he is--when Dr. Stanpole and the nurse arrive. The following day Finny is sent home to recuperate. The summer session comes to an end, appropriately enough for Gene, for until now summer had represented freedom, sports, and running outdoors, with Finny as the light and life of it all. Now all that has changed. A month later, after a sojourn at home, Gene heads back to school for his senior year. On the way he makes a detour to call on Finny. NOTE: The "surprise" reunion is no surprise to Finny, who appears to have been waiting anxiously in hop ...
    Related: separate peace, ultimate punishment, last time, self awareness, burning
  • Abraham Maslow - 1,910 words
    Abraham Maslow ABRAHAM MASLOW Born April1,1908 Abraham Maslow was the oldest of seven children born to his parents in Brooklyn New York. Feeling pressure from his parents to achieve academic greatness, Abraham went through early childhood with few friends. Focusing mainly on his studies Maslow had a quiet and unfulfilling adolescence. Abraham started off his college career by attending city college in New York were he began to study law, as his father had wanted him to do. He soon lost interest and transferred to the University of Wisconsin and studied psychology. Here Maslow received, in 1934, his Ph.D. During his college career Abraham married his cousin Bertha Goodman, his parents did not ...
    Related: abraham, abraham maslow, maslow, social order, third force
  • Add And Learning Strategies - 1,641 words
    Add And Learning Strategies Attention can be defined as the process of selecting certain environmental inputs needed for cognitive processing. Information that we are capable of sensing stays with us in the sensory register for a very brief period of time. From this point the information is cognitively processed. The role of attention can be found in the moving of this information from the sensory register into the working memory. Normal attention span seems to develop in three stages. First, the childs attention is said to be overly exclusive. This is a term used by psychologists to describe attention that is focused on a single object for a long period of time while tuning out all other st ...
    Related: classroom learning, learning environment, learning experience, learning strategies, family history
  • Adolescence - 1,083 words
    Adolescence Adolescence for me is the period within human life when most of a person's characteristics are changing from childlike to adultlike. Changes in the body are the most observable occurring at this stage. Other kinds of developments take place such as, intellectual, academic. Social and spiritual. Physical Selves During the phase of Adolescence, girls body is changing in size, shape, and hormonal structure. Adolescent girls focus on their changing bodies. They feel, look and act differently. Absorbing all these changes is very difficult. The preoccupation with bodies at this age cannot be overstated. Small flaws become obsessions. Just at this point that their bodies are becoming ro ...
    Related: adolescence, social life, physical appearance, adolescent girls, sexuality
  • Adolf Hitler - 443 words
    Adolf Hitler Hitlers Childhood Adolf Hitler was born on April 20, 1889, in a small Austrian village called Braunau-am-Inn. Adlof was born a sickly child, his mother, Klara, watched over him night and day. Klara Hitler protected young Adolf from her short-tempered husband, Alois. Adolf grew into a thin, dark-haired, blue-eyed boy with an angular face (Twisted 63). At the age of 6, Hitler started school and showed excellent achievement in his classes. Outside of school young Hitler was energetic and had many friends. Adolfs home life was far less happy. His father ran the household like a military boot camp. When his father was in the same room as him, Adolf was not allowed to speak without pe ...
    Related: adolf, adolf hitler, hitler, academic performance, nazi party
  • Adult Illiteracy - 3,219 words
    ... atic, enemies of early, intensive teaching of phonics. Frank Smith and Kenneth Goodman are two of today's most influential proponents of the look and say or as they would term it, whole language philosophy of teaching reading. San Diego State University Professor Patrick Groff recently reviewed 43 reading texts, all published in the1980's and used by teachers' colleges in training reading teachers, to see if they included the findings of researchers that the code-emphasis or phonics approach to teaching reading should be used. He found that none of these books advocate phonics. In fact, only nine of these books inform teachers that there is current debate about if or when phonics should ...
    Related: adult, adult education, adult literacy, illiteracy, state university
  • Affirmative Action - 1,450 words
    Affirmative Action "Treating people differently because of the color of their skin used to be called discrimination, but today its called affirmative action" (Amselle 177). Affirmative action today, is considered to be one of the most controversial dilemma facing our equal status of individual rights. As we all know, affirmative action was implemented with the idea and hope that America would finally become truly equal. So far, it has lasted for thirty years and had not solved any of our current problems concerning equal rights it made things worse. It was created with the intention of using reverse discrimination to solve the problem of discrimination. In that, minority groups are being ch ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, educational system, equal rights, ancestors
  • Affirmative Action - 1,450 words
    Affirmative Action "Treating people differently because of the color of their skin used to be called discrimination, but today its called affirmative action" (Amselle 177). Affirmative action today, is considered to be one of the most controversial dilemma facing our equal status of individual rights. As we all know, affirmative action was implemented with the idea and hope that America would finally become truly equal. So far, it has lasted for thirty years and had not solved any of our current problems concerning equal rights it made things worse. It was created with the intention of using reverse discrimination to solve the problem of discrimination. In that, minority groups are being ch ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, individual rights, american woman, constitution
  • Affirmative Action - 1,599 words
    Affirmative Action AFFIRMATIVE ACTION INTRODUCTION Affirmative action is the name of an American social practice through which members of historically disadvantaged racial and/or ethnic groups are given preferential treatment in an effort to compensate for past harm caused to their ancestors. For thirty years, affirmative action was carefully shielded from open, honest evaluation while it simultaneously grew more pervasive along with the federal bureaucracy and welfare state. The recent political upheaval caused by the Republican takeover of Congress in 1994 has opened the door for opponents of affirmative action programs to successfully pursue their gradual elimination. If affirmative actio ...
    Related: action program, affirmative, affirmative action, jossey bass, american people
  • Affirmative Action - 1,098 words
    Affirmative Action Affirmative Action ? The Right Approach? In the beginning, it seemed simple enough. In 1961, John F. Kennedy, then president of the United States of America, established the Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity by executive order. The goal was to curb discrimination by the government and its contractors, who were now required to ?not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because of race, creed, color, or national origin. The Contractor will take affirmative action, to ensure that applicants are employed, and that employees are treated during employment, without regard to their race, creed, color, or national origin.? Title VI of the Civil Right ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, equal employment, lyndon b johnson, adopt
  • Affirmative Action - 3,345 words
    ... Aguilar 1. Affirmative action should be eliminated (Sadler 70). Affirmative action does not solve discrimination problems; on the contrary, it harms those the program is meant help. The program divides society into two groups based on ethnicity; this completely defies the effort to have a color-blind America (where society does not see ethnicity or a color difference in any person). Disguised as an equal opportunity program affirmative action discriminates against non-minorities. Affirmative action has its affects in collegiate admissions and employment, however, remains more controversial in college admissions. Many groups protest the abolishment of affirmative action for sake of higher ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, college admissions, best method, dominate
  • Affirmative Action - 845 words
    Affirmative Action Affirmative action is considered to be one of the most controversial dilemmas facing equal status of individual rights for Americans today. When it began affirmative action was implemented with the idea and hope that America would finally become truly equal. So far, it has lasted for thirty years and hasnt solved any of our current problems concerning equal rights in fact it made things worse. It was created with the intention of using reverse discrimination to solve the problem of discrimination. In that, individuals from minority groups are being chosen over the qualifications of other workers. Some find it unfair in practice; others find it very helpful. Those that sta ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, united states of america, individual rights, institution
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