Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: american writers

  • 53 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • African American Writers - 910 words
    African American Writers The African- American Community has been blessed with a multitude of scholars. Two of those scholars include Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du bois. Both of these men, had a vision for African- Americans. They wanted to see the advancement of their race of people. These great leaders just had different viewpoints as to how this should be accomplished. Mr. Washingtons viewpoints are based on his own personal experience and understanding of politics. Mr. Du bois viewpoints came from his knowledge of the importance of education and its ability to break down barriers of color. Washington and Du bois wanted to see the advancement of the African-American people. The quest ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american community, american people, american writers
  • Major American Writers - 1,333 words
    Major American Writers The honored title of "Major American Writer" tends to be ambiguous and ill defined in part because each individual reader holds preconceived notions about what characteristics a writer should possess to be classified as a major author. Every work an author creates combines with the others to form a body of material on which the writer is judged. This class on Major American Writers studied five authors with completely different genres, writing styles, and general appeal. The choice for these particular authors was based on criteria unique to the instructor. Since every reader requires different characteristics, this paper will outline my specific criteria for a Major A ...
    Related: american, american writers, road not taken, henry james, fundamental
  • Robert Penn Warren, Born In Guthrie, Kentucky In 1905, Was One Of The Twentieth Centurys Most Eminent American Writers He Was - 997 words
    Robert Penn Warren, born in Guthrie, Kentucky in 1905, was one of the twentieth century's most eminent American writers. He was a distinguished novelist and poet, literary critic, essayist, short story writer, and coeditor of numerous textbooks. He also a founding editor of The Southern Review, a journal of literary criticism and political thought. The primary influences on Robert Warren's career as a poet were probably his Kentucky boyhood, and his relationships with his father and his maternal grandfather. As a boy, Warren spent many hours on his grandfather's farm, absorbing stories of the Civil War and the local tobacco wars between growers and wholesalers, the subject of his first novel ...
    Related: american, american literature, american poetry, american writers, century poetry, eminent, kentucky
  • The American Renaissance Is A Time That American Writers Received More Recognition As To The Quality Of Their Works Before Th - 859 words
    The American Renaissance is a time that American writers received more recognition as to the quality of their works. Before this time scholars looked upon the works of the artist and writers in America were looked upon as secondary to the across the Atlantic. The novelist Gustave de Beaumont warned Europeans not to look for poetry, literature, or fine arts in this country'. (McQuade et al pg. 462) When one of the proprietors of the North American Review first read young William Cullen Bryant's blank verse, Wordsworthian Thanatopsis (1817), a poem subsequently hailed as the finest yet written in America, he assumed the author was British: No one on this side of the Atlantic is capable of writ ...
    Related: american, american history, american literature, american renaissance, american review, american writers, north american
  • Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By Twain - 775 words
    Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By Twain In the Style of Twain The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, is said to be " the source from which all great American literature has stemmed" (Smith 127). This is in part attributed to Mark Twain's ability to use humor and satire, as well as incorporating serious subject matter into his work. Throughout the novel Twain takes on the serious issue of Huck's moral dilemma. One such issue which is particularly important in the novel is pointed out by Smith: He swears and smokes, but he has a set of ethics all his own. He believes that slaves belong to their rightful owners, yet in his honest gratitude toward his friend Jim, he helps him to escape the bonds of ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, finn, huckleberry, huckleberry finn, mark twain, the adventures of huckleberry finn, twain
  • American Philosophy - 626 words
    American Philosophy In all its forms, American philosophy emphasizes freedom and the supreme importance of the individual. Indeed, an examination of four major American writers shows these concepts in all four main schools of American thought-- Epicureanism, Transcendentalism, Pragmatism, and Protestantism. Epicureanism is the pursuit of pleasure in order to avoid pain. This philosophy is very American. One of the most famous American-Epicureans is Walt Whitman. Whitman is, perhaps, America's greatest poet. He was an ardent supporter of freedom and democracy. His poetry not only reflected his love and respect for America, but also the importance and the needs of the individual. Whitman's lov ...
    Related: american, american culture, american dream, american philosophy, american society, american writers, philosophy
  • Anime Vs American Animation - 2,825 words
    ... ent qualities. The animation we see can be divided into two different styles. Those styles are called "limited animation" and "full animation". In limited animation, only parts of a character move at any given time. For instance, only the mouth of a character will move while he or she is speaking. This form of animation is often seen in syndicated cartoons or those shown on Saturday mornings. In full animation, almost everything on the screen moves at the same time. The movement is often choreographed with movements of real actors to appear as life-like as possible. This style is used mostly in Disney movies. Still, many animated cartoons which would be classified as limited animation ar ...
    Related: american, american version, american writers, animation, anime, japanese animation, most american
  • Anime Vs American Animation - 2,821 words
    ... ation we see can be divided into two different styles. Those styles are called "limited animation" and "full animation". In limited animation, only parts of a character move at any given time. For instance, only the mouth of a character will move while he or she is speaking. This form of animation is often seen in syndicated cartoons or those shown on Saturday mornings. In full animation, almost everything on the screen moves at the same time. The movement is often choreographed with movements of real actors to appear as life-like as possible. This style is used mostly in Disney movies. Still, many animated cartoons which would be classified as limited animation are blending in some full ...
    Related: american, american version, american writers, animation, anime, japanese animation, most american
  • Atomic - 2,186 words
    ... re were no smells. There was no movement. Every step I took made a gravelly squeak in blue-white frost. And every squeak was echoed loudly. The season of locking was over. The Earth was locked up tight (179).This description eerily resembles what many have said the Earth will look like during a nuclear winter (Stone, 62). In addition to Dr. Hoenikker and his doomsday games, Vonnegut provides an interesting analysis of atomic age society with the Bokonon religion. This religion, completely made up by Vonnegut and used in this novel, is the religion of every single inhabitant of San Lorenzo, the books imaginary banana republic. This is the island where Jonah eventually ends up, and where t ...
    Related: atomic, atomic bomb, collected poems, nuclear waste, ripper
  • Black Boy And Their Eyes Were Watching God - 1,878 words
    Black Boy And Their Eyes Were Watching God I. Abstract This paper examines the drastic differences in literary themes and styles of Richard Wright and Zora Neale Hurston, two African--American writers from the early 1900's. The portrayals of African-American women by each author are contrasted based on specific examples from their two most prominent novels, Native Son by Wright, and Their Eves Were Watching God by Hurston. With the intent to explain this divergence, the autobiographies of both authors (Black Boy and Dust Tracks on a Road) are also analyzed. Particular examples from the lives of each author are cited to demonstrate the contrasting lifestyles and experiences that created these ...
    Related: black boy, black woman, black women, most black, their eyes were watching god
  • Death Of Salesman - 2,531 words
    ... ne, and Id like you to try my brand. Bring her a champagne, Stanley" (Act 2, Scene 7). Most of the action takes place inside of Willys disturbed mind, as he relives crucial scenes from the past even while groping through present-day encounters. The rest of the action takes place in the kitchen and two bedrooms of Willys modest Brooklyn home. It was once in a suburban area but is now crowded in by high apartment buildings, "The way they boxed us in here. Bricks and windows, windows and bricks" (Act 1, Scene 1). The kitchen has a table in it with three chairs and a refrigerator. No other fixtures are in the kitchen. There is a living room in the house, which is not fully furnished. The boy ...
    Related: death of a salesman, salesman, american society, dining room, dislike
  • Edgar Allen Poe - 1,177 words
    Edgar Allen Poe Edgar Allen Poe's life problems had a profound impact on his various short stories and poems. Poe's problems started seemingly right after birth. His biological father, David Poe, Jr., was an alcoholic and often abused Poe (Encyclopedia Americana, 274-275). Shortly after the age of two, Poe's mother died. He only had memories of her vomiting and being carried away by sinister men dressed in black, as he put it (American Writers III). There has been some speculation as to how this affected Poe. According to Marie Bonaparte, a student of Sigmund Freud, his mother's death caused many mental disorders. Many agree that it warped him until the day he died. After his mother's death, ...
    Related: allen, edgar, edgar allen, sigmund freud, encyclopedia americana
  • Edgar Poe - 945 words
    Edgar Poe "Poetry is a form of imaginative literary expression that makes its effect by the sound and imagery of its language ("Poetry")." Many poets base their writings on their personal experiences throughout life. Some poets write of their memories or hopes, or even dreams. Edgar Allan Poe was one of the greatest American writers of all time. He was known as a poet and critic. Poe is one of many authors whos life has been reflected throughout his poems and other writings. E. A. Poe was born in Boston in 1809. He was orphaned in early childhood. He was raised by a businessman in England from the age of six. He returned to the U.S. after many years, remaining in private schools. In America, ...
    Related: edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, u.s. military, harvard university
  • Edna Millay - 738 words
    Edna Millay Edna St. Vincent Millay defied the times in which a woman was to operate, in her life style, and in her poems, "Renascence", "My candle burns at both ends", and "I forgot in Camelot, the man I loved in Rome." She was one of the best known poets of the 1900's. Her poems were said to be delicate but outspoken (World book 1968). While in school in addition to being an exceptional student her teachers also considered her to be a particularly bad student, because teachers would give lectures and she would interrupt asking acute questions. Overall, Millay was a very odd lady for her time (Gurko 59). This was because she was a "free woman", which was a symbolic figure in the late 18 and ...
    Related: edna, millay, sylvia plath, world book, bound
  • Emily Dickinson, A Creative Poet During The Midnineteenth Century, Wrote What Many - 1,024 words
    Emily Dickinson, a creative poet during the mid-nineteenth century, wrote what many consider to be truly American poetry. To understand why Dickinson is considered a brilliant writer of American poetry, one must know about the time period in which she wrote her poetry. Dickinson wrote during the era of American literature known as the Age of Expansion (Perkins 869). This was during the first half-century after the Civil War to the First World War which was approximately 1865-1915 (Perkins 869). During this time period, American literature went through many drastic changes. American writers progressively moved from romanticism to realism (Perkins 870). Realism was a much more realistic interp ...
    Related: creative, emily, emily dickinson, poet, civil war
  • Flannery Oconnor: Themes - 1,326 words
    Flannery O'connor: Themes Flannery OConnors Themes: Alienation, True Country, and the Demonic OConnor uses many themes throughout all of her works. Her most criticized themes are alienation, true country life, and the demonic. Throughout the short stories of A Good Man is Hard to Find, Everything That Rises Must Converge, Good Country People, The Life you Save Might be your Own, The Geranium, A Circle in the Fire, and The River OConnor speaks of her heritage and her religious faults. Miss OConnor created characters and their dramatic oppositions by separating, exaggerating, and polarizing elements in herself (Hyman 359). OConnor could be considered a writer of apocalyptic violence, a grotesq ...
    Related: flannery, flannery o'connor, mentally challenged, local color, tragedy
  • Gabriel Garcia Marquez - 596 words
    Gabriel Garcia Marquez Gabriel Garcia Marquez, a novelist, short story writer, journalist, critic, and screenwriter, has had international recognition for many years. He is included among the group of South American writers who rose to prominence during the 1960s, a time often referred to as the "boom" of Latin American Literature. In his short stories and novels, Leaf Storm, One Hundred Years of Solitude, Chronicle of a Death Foretold, and The Autumn of the Patriarch, he utilizes his background, and personal experiences, which makes his novels so popular. Garcia Marquez was born in Aracataca, Colombia, on March 6, 1928. He lived with his grandparents for the first eight years of his life. T ...
    Related: gabriel, gabriel garcia, gabriel garcia marquez, garcia, garcia marquez, marquez
  • Harlem Renaissance - 701 words
    Harlem Renaissance The Harlem Renaissance Period (1919-1940) included many outstanding features and writers which made for a wonderful cache of literary works by African American writers. There was an unprecidented variety and scope of publications by African Americans which brought about a new sense of purpose, confidence, and achievement unusual to many black artists due to thier troubled history. This led to thier irresistable impulse to create boldly expressive art of high quality. The 1920's saw the first significant amount of publishing of works by black artists since the turn of the century. Migration to the north seemed a necessity due to the more and more intolerable hiring conditio ...
    Related: harlem, harlem renaissance, renaissance, renaissance period, weldon johnson
  • Helen Hunt Jackso - 1,022 words
    Helen Hunt Jackso A Century Of Dishonor, a Triumph or Tragedy? The author Helen Hunt Jackson had hoped for a triumph over the mistreatment, abuse, and mainly the deaths of seemingly innocent Native Americans with her novel, A Century Of Dishonor. However, when the hard cold reality set in, her novel was merely a small tragedy in the battle for the Native Americans that sadly went unnoticed. What treaty that the whites ever made with us red men have they kept? Not one. When I was a boy the Sioux owned the world. The sun rose and set in their lands. They sent 10,000 horse men to battle. Where are the warriors to-day? Who slew them? Where are our lands? Who owns them? What white man can say I e ...
    Related: helen, helen hunt, helen hunt jackson, hunt, hunt jackson
  • Hemingway Protagonist Soldiers Home - 1,139 words
    Hemingway Protagonist - Soldier's Home Various authors, through years of discipline, develop their own style in creating characters. Ernest Hemingway varied his style by establishing an indestructible template for pressing characters into molded protagonists. This "template" protagonist follows a unique set of standards unlike any other character, produced by any other author. In his literary work "Soldier's Home", Hemingway creates the character Krebs to abide by this set of standards. By working within the circumstances presented to him, Krebs fits the mold of a typical Hemingway protagonist by overcoming his disillusions through heroic actions. To begin with, Krebs returns home from World ...
    Related: ernest hemingway, hemingway, protagonist, soldiers home, literary works
  • 53 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3