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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: american worker

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  • A Civil Action - 1,036 words
    A Civil Action A Civil Action The movie A Civil Action brings up an interesting idea that many people in the public don't see or hear about very often. The idea that the big corporations often don't take into account the safety of the people that work for them or the people that live around the factories. These big corporations are run entirely by money and the idea of what things will cost and how much money they can possibly make. Too many times money is more important than the lives of human beings and the people that run these places only see in dollars and cents. The moral issues that this dilemma brings up are immense. This has been happening for centuries since the industrial revoluti ...
    Related: civil action, maximum profit, drinking water, products company, american
  • A Civil Acton - 1,034 words
    A Civil Acton A Civil Action The movie A Civil Action brings up an interesting idea that many people in the public don't see or hear about very often. The idea that the big corporations often don't take into account the safety of the people that work for them or the people that live around the factories. These big corporations are run entirely by money and the idea of what things will cost and how much money they can possibly make. Too many times money is more important than the lives of human beings and the people that run these places only see in dollars and cents. The moral issues that this dilemma brings up are immense. This has been happening for centuries since the industrial revolutio ...
    Related: civil action, corporate world, maximum profit, human beings, wouldn
  • A Stereotypical Media - 1,258 words
    A Stereotypical Media A Stereotypical Media The media of todays society plays the peddler to the stereotypes that plague our country. However, the media is not solely to blame. Susan Sontag states in her essay The Image World: Through being photographed, something becomes part of a system of information, fitted into schemes of classification and storage(Sontag 196). Through our own demand as consumers, the use of advertising in television, newspapers, and especially magazines relays to the public an erratic system of stereotypical information. The system of information relayed through photographic imagery in advertising directly affects the thoughts of society, on how a woman should look and ...
    Related: media, stereotypical, american worker, men and women, plant
  • Born In Boston In 1809, Edgar Poe Was Destined To Lead A Rather Somber And Brief Life, Most Of It - 1,157 words
    Born in Boston in 1809, Edgar Poe was destined to lead a rather somber and brief life, most of it a struggle against poverty. His mother died when Edgar was only two, his father already long disappeared. He was raised as a foster child in Virginia by Frances Allen and her husband John, a Richmond tobacco merchant. Poe later lived in Baltimore with his aunt, Maria Clemm and her daughter Virginia, whom he eventually married. The trio formed a household which moved to New York and then to Philadelphia, where they lived for about six years -- apparently the happiest, most productive years of his life. Of Poe's several Philadelphia homes, only this one survives. In 1844 they moved to New York, wh ...
    Related: boston, edgar, edgar allen, pulitzer prize, tale heart
  • Cannabis Hemp Marijuana - 2,195 words
    ... lity is strong enough that we must try. Ultimately, the world has no other rational environmental choice but to give up fossil fuel. ENERGY SECURITY At this point, we can tell OPEC goodbye forever. The national balance of payments deficit is cast by the wayside and your personal energy bills can by cut by at least 50%, and perhaps as much as 90% with biomass from hemp and recycled waste. No more elderly or poor people freezing to death or living in misery in the winter. If introduced to Third World nations, hemp biomass could drastically cut our overseas aid and reasons for war, while raising the quality of life there by quantum leaps. The world's economy will/should boom as it never has ...
    Related: cannabis, hemp, marijuana, marijuana prohibition, u.s. government
  • Civil Action - 1,027 words
    Civil Action The movie brings up an interesting idea that many people in the public don't see or hear about very often. The idea that the big corporations often don't take into account the safety of the people that work for them or the people that live around the factories. These big corporations are run entirely by money and the idea of what things will cost and how much money they can possibly make. Too many times money is more important than the lives of human beings and the people that run these places only see in dollars and cents. The moral issues that this dilemma brings up are immense. This has been happening for centuries since the industrial revolution. Workers were subjected too h ...
    Related: civil action, drinking water, john travolta, american worker, cancer
  • Depression Of The 1930s - 1,257 words
    Depression Of The 1930'S Depression of the 1930s The economic depression that beset the United States and other countries in the 1930s was unique in its magnitude and its consequences. At the depth of the depression, in 1933, one American worker in every four was out of a job. In other countries unemployment ranged between 15 percent and 25 percent of the labor force. The great industrial slump continued throughout the 1930s, shaking the foundations of Western capitalism and the society based upon it. Economic Aspects President Calvin COOLIDGE had said during the long prosperity of the 1920s that The business of America is business. Despite the seeming business prosperity of the 1920s, howev ...
    Related: depression years, economic depression, great depression, world war i, national product
  • Downsizing - 764 words
    Downsizing The downsizing of corporations in America today has been brought about by two dominant factors: advancements in technology and globalization of markets. Technology has forced the American worker to adapt to their surroundings or lose their jobs. This is especially true for the uneducated, workers with minimal skills, and for the rest of the workforce who are not computer literate. That is not to say, however, that educated or trained workers are not subject to downsizing. It has happened to myself, members of my family and to my friends. It can affect anyone; the only way that an individual can overcome the effects of downsizing, is to adapt. This can be accomplished through educa ...
    Related: downsizing, global trade, market economy, living standards, competitiveness
  • Economics Of Immigration - 1,228 words
    Economics Of Immigration From the origin of the United States, immigration has been crucial for the economic advancement and expansion of the nation. The US truly is a melting pot of many cultures and ideas, and it has benefited greatly from its diversity. However, with a much-reduced demand for unskilled or low-skilled workers, US policy must adapt so that it can better maximize the net economic benefits of immigration. While this probably does not include a universal drop in the number of legal immigrants, it would include the screening of applicants in such a way that preference is given to more economically beneficial candidates. It would also include making families totally responsible ...
    Related: economic benefits, economics, immigration, immigration policy, legal immigration
  • Globalization - 1,818 words
    Globalization For many years black people in the United States have struggled for their rights and their piece of the American dream. Now that the world is moving toward a new global era the African American person, worker and human has been left out of this turn in the century and, the system is letting them hang their selves. Globalization has made it so that anyone with the right equipment and knowledge can chat or do business anywhere in the world with just a few clicks of a couple of buttons. Globalization is making the gap between the races bigger every day, and it seems that no body is slowing down to lend a helping hand. Globalization has placed a new standard on the way we live toda ...
    Related: globalization, st louis, most black, free trade, culturally
  • Immigration To America - 659 words
    Immigration to America Immigration to America In the late 1800's and early 1900's there were massive waves of immigration to America. These new immigrants were largely Italians, Hungarians, Jews, Serbians, Irish, and Slovaks. Fleeing such hardships as poverty, religious persecution, and political unrest in their homelands, immigrants journeyed to the United States in search of freedom and opportunity. During their voyage from their homelands to Ellis Island, many immigrants suffered. Traveling by steamships, voyages lasted anywhere between seven days to a month. Many immigrants ate off of tin plates with only soup or bread to choose from. To alleviate themselves from the unpleasant smells on ...
    Related: america, immigration, yellow fever, marital status, jews
  • Labor Relations - 1,156 words
    Labor Relations This paper will attempt to discuss the cost and benefit of trade unionism, as it exists in the United States. To understand the pros and cons, it is important to understand the environment in which trade unionism developed and the needs they attempted to satisfy. It will discuss the evolution of Trade Unionism through the centuries. From that understanding we can discuss the topic as it relates to our current environment. Historians agree that American Unionism started in the early 19th Century. These early organizations were formed along the lines of Craft. Daniel Mills explains, in Labor Relations, Crafts people worked for themselves, or in small shops. They were often in c ...
    Related: child labor, labor, labor relations, labor union, federal laws
  • Technology Impact On 1920 - 1,320 words
    Technology Impact On 1920 Life World War I, "The war that would end all wars.", had ended by 1918; Europe was left in ruins physically, politically, and economically. The years following the most devastating war to take place prior to the 1920s, Europe would struggle with economic and political recovery, but not the United States. Left virtually unharmed by World War I, the United States was even able to experience a decade of peace and prosperity following such a disastrous war. Of the many reasons for America's prosperity, technology played one of the most vital parts in bringing the great economic and cultural prosperity that America experienced during the 1920s. New advancements, new dis ...
    Related: technology, income taxes, mass production, average american, stretching
  • The New Deal During The 1930s, America Witnessed A Breakdown Of The Democratic And Free Enterprise System As The Us Fell Into - 841 words
    The New Deal During the 1930's, America witnessed a breakdown of the Democratic and free enterprise system as the US fell into the worst depression in history. The economic depression that beset the United States and other countries was unique in its severity and its consequences. At the depth of the depression, in 1933, one American worker in every four was out of a job. The great industrial slump continued throughout the 1930's, shaking the foundations of Western capitalism. The New Deal describes the program of US president Franklin D. Roosevelt from 1933 to 1939 of relief, recovery, and reform. These new policies aimed to solve the economic problems created by the depression of the 1930' ...
    Related: america, breakdown, enterprise, enterprise system, free enterprise, new deal
  • The Union Movement Of The Late 19th Century - 913 words
    The Union Movement Of The Late 19Th Century The union movement of the late 19th century by Eli Hatch During 1870 through 1900 workers joined together; responding to the power of their employers caused by the growth of industrialization. The worker did not always have the luxury of leaving after eight hours of work, the right to representation, or the even the right to work in a safe environment. The working people of nineteenth century America had to unite in struggle to achieve the gains that are often taken selfishly and taken for granted today. There were many successes and failures in organized labor; the successes were often obtained through the loss of the worker, often through lost wa ...
    Related: century america, nineteenth century, union members, union pacific, organized labor
  • Unions: Cause And Effects - 670 words
    Unions: Cause And Effects Ever since the dawn of time it has been the tendency of workers to try and better their conditions, the slaves in Egypt wanted to change the way they were treated, as did the slaves in the Americas. It has also been the tendency of employers to try and get more for less. They want the most work and productivity from employees with the least amount of pay on their behalf. It is now the trend for workers in the auto industry to form unions to help them in their fight for better working conditions. Unions date back to the days of the American Revolution when journeymen blacksmiths formed pacts to help each other receive better pay on jobs they performed and prevent und ...
    Related: creative writing, auto industry, united auto, recession, on-line
  • Urban Industrial Workers - 1,622 words
    Urban Industrial Workers As urban industrial workers expanded in the 19th century, industry and the industrial work force boomed as well. Workers , however, were met with difficult situations that ultimately led to violent outbursts. Low wages could not buy food and clothes at the same time and conditions in the work place brought about countless deaths and injuries. Growing number of immigrants caused the reduction of wages and insecurity of the workers caused unemployment. There were hostilities between workers, employers, and organizations and complaints of no social safety nets. Due to these chaotic dilemmas, union members decided to emerge as one, in order to overcome the corporations. ...
    Related: american worker, industrial workers, urban, workers, social safety net
  • What Is An American - 549 words
    What Is An American What is an American? The traits of the typical American has changed drastically throughout the years. We have changed in many ways from when we officially became independent in 1776 to the present time in 2001. Some of the metamorphosis we have undergone as a country have been for the better, others for the worst. In the twentieth and now the twenty-first centuries, the American society has grown up with new ideas on life and new technology that has become a part of life. The Modern American can be described as someone who is hardworking, self-made, and electronically advanced. Women used to stay home and take care of the house while their husbands worked. Now women are w ...
    Related: american, american history, american society, american worker, modern american, typical american
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