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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: foster care

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  • Foster Care Parents - 334 words
    Foster Care Parents When foster care parents become discouraged with raising a foster care child it is frequently due to behavioral problems. An adolescent who has experienced a history of maltreatment is most likely to have such difficult behavior problems that lead to the disruption of placement. Many parents have a difficult time dealing with behavioral problems from a teen who has grown up in a healthy, loving environment, much less a teenager who is likely to have built up anger due to a past of neglect, physical abuse, or even sexual abuse. Age has been found to be the number one factor in predicting foster or adoption disruption; "the older the child, the greater the risk of disruptio ...
    Related: foster, foster care, physical abuse, sexual abuse, adopt
  • Abortion - 323 words
    Abortion Many have pondered upon the meaning of abortion. The argument being that every child that is born should be wanted and others who believe that every child that is conceived should be born. The choice of a woman whether or not she wants to conceive a child is called abortion. Abortion preserves a womans constitutional right, relieves the undesired child of future distress, and establishes a peaceful society. Abortion preserves a womans constitutional right. The fourteenth Amendment, personal liberty, gives women the choice of abortion. The unborn child should be the property of the mother. Women should have the ability to choose when to have a child. Taking away this right would be i ...
    Related: abortion, fourteenth amendment, violent behavior, foster care, fourteenth
  • Adoption: Nature Or Nurture - 1,361 words
    Adoption: Nature Or Nurture? Adoption: Nature or Nurture? By Clay Cooper 12/2/00 Are parents those who give birth to a child or those who care for a child? Does nature or nurture make a woman a mother? As more and more heartbreaking tugs-of-war between biological and adoptive parents surface, anyone searching for a baby has good reason for concern(Casey 119). Baby Jessica was raised from infancy by adoptive parents, Jan and Roberta DeBoer. For two and a half years Jessica was at the heart of one of the most bitter custody battles in America, caught between the parents in Michigan who reared her and the parents in Iowa who gave birth to her and wanted her back (Ingrassia and Springen 60). Car ...
    Related: nurture, mary beth, legal system, uniform state laws, american
  • African Widow Bird - 1,437 words
    African Widow Bird Finding good day care can certainly pose a problem these days, unless, of course, you're an African widow bird. When it comes time for a female widow bird to lay her eggs, she simply locates the nest of a nearby Estrildid finch and surreptitiously drops the eggs inside. That's the last the widow bird ever sees of her offspring. But not to worry, because the Estrildid finch will take devoted care of the abandoned birds as if they were her own. And who's to tell the difference? Though adult widow birds and Estrildid finches don't look at all alike, their eggs do. Not only that, baby widow birds are dead ringers for Estrildid finch chicks, both having the same colouration and ...
    Related: african, bird, widow, sri lanka, sea anemones
  • American Civil Liberties Union - 681 words
    American Civil Liberties Union American Civil Liberties Union The American Civil Liberties Union is an organization which takes on the issues of concern to the American public and any violations of their rights, or liberties, including discrimination. I turned to their web site for information regarding their activity. The following information is from the summary of their work in 1999. Although it's two years old, I feel it paints an accurate picture of the ACLU, their work, and what they stand for. Teen Mothers in National Honor Society In the spring of 1998, two 18 year old teen mothers were barred from admission into the National Honor Society(NHS) based on the fact that they'd had prema ...
    Related: american, american civil, american civil liberties union, american public, civil liberties, liberties union
  • Child Abluse - 1,980 words
    Child Abluse 1 What is Child Abuse? By definition, child abuse is the deliberate and willful injury of a child by a caretaker hitting, beating with an object, slamming against a wall, even killing. It involves active, hostile, aggressive treatment. The key word in the definition of child abuse is deliberate. Why would anyone physically harm a child? The physical destruction of a child is the extreme reaction of parents to the stress of having children. Most people are not aware of the fact that deliberately hitting a child is considered a felony in all fifty states. Abuse of children is more common than most people realize. At least one out of five adult women and one out of every ten adult ...
    Related: child abuse, child pornography, child sexual abuse, prevent child abuse, young child
  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - 1,768 words
    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: A Preventable Birth Defect If women didnt drink anymore during pregnancy, there would never be another baby born with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome or Fetal Alcohol Effect (McCuen 33). This is a very powerful statement. It is also a very simple cure for an alarmingly high birth defect that all women have the power to stop. Every year more than 40,000 American children are born with defects because their mother drank alcohol while pregnant (McCuen 34). That is 1 to 3 per 1,000 live births (McCuen 31). Many of these cases go undiagnosed It is also the number one cause of mental retardation in the United States, and one of the three leading causes of bir ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol dependency, alcohol syndrome, drink alcohol, fetal, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome
  • Gun Laws - 5,486 words
    Gun Laws States from Michigan to Nebraska to California, as well as the federal government, are considering new rules on letting law-abiding citizens carry guns. Does allowing citizens to carry concealed handguns deter violent crimes? Or does this cause otherwise law-abiding citizens to harm each other? Thirty-one states now have guaranteed their citizens the right to carry concealed handguns if applicants do not have a criminal record or a history of significant mental illness. So what have the results been? The numbers tell the story Using the FBI's crime-rate data for all 3,054 U.S. counties by year from 1977 to 1992, I co-authored a study in the January 1997 Journal of Legal Studies. We ...
    Related: case law, control laws, gun laws, foster care, individual rights
  • Homeless - 806 words
    Homeless There are too many homeless people; the government is not helping, and there are not enough shelters. Today there are some thirty thousand children living on the streets of New York City. With this many homeless children on the streets, the government should be helping more by building more shelters. The government is not helping in the building of shelters, so the people of our country must help. "A federal takeover of the homelessness problem, with gushing federal dollars ... will do little to help" (Berne 100). "(The) Government creates homelessness and shelter dependency when it provides too little money even to pay the rent" (Rossi 106). The government needs to help the homeles ...
    Related: homeless, homeless population, york city, good thing, takeover
  • Homelessness - 1,230 words
    ... OMELESSNESS Defining where the homeless stand in our society scale is one of hardest aspects in conducting a study of the population and understanding the definitions used in research is one of the most challenging tasks for people who want to use its results. Most would agree that people in Shelters or literally living on the street are homeless, but there is less agreement regarding people in the following circumstances: Youth on their own, with no permanent residence or even an usual place to sleep; children who have been separated from their homeless parents and are in foster care or are living with relatives; People living in stable but physically inadequate housing (having no plumb ...
    Related: homelessness, extreme poverty, social services, homeless population, cuts
  • Homelessness In Our Nation - 1,205 words
    ... the available shelters...and that the jobless are simply not motivated." (Hombs, 9) Thus, Congress left in place a number of measures which reduced the poor's access to housing, such as tightened eligibility standards for public housing, cuts to federal aid to poor children, (Foscarinis, par. 5-8) and cuts in subsidized low-rent housing. Still, today, our nation's government has not enacted any permanent solutions to homelessness. Our local, state or federal governments have not addressed the so desperately needed solutions for the fundamental cause of homelessness: 1) providing subsidies to make existing housing affordable, creating additional affordable housing through rehabilitation, ...
    Related: homelessness, federal government, staff training, affordable housing, maintaining
  • Intelligence And Society - 1,679 words
    Intelligence And Society Intelligence In society, people base their life on intelligence. They do everything possible to get ahead in life. To get ahead, they cheat each other, back stab, and commit many sinful acts. Also, they educate themselves so they are capable of doing whatever is required of them. Society is trying to always make themselves smarter. Are they trying to change something that they have no control over though? Intelligence is something that everybody has, but is something that is developed over time. The development of intelligence has many items that play a factor. For instance, environment and heredity both play a role in developing a person's I.Q. "Each of us are born ...
    Related: intelligence, intelligence testing, university press, early childhood, determining
  • International Adoption - 1,615 words
    International Adoption International Adoption There are many reasons as to why people choose to adopt a child. Sometimes it has to do with infertility and couples decide to adopt children because, I could not have biological children and I do not believe in some methods of fertility treatments (Carney), but there are other reasons too. According to Christine Adamec, some people think that it is better to adopt than to bring another child into the world. Others do not want to pass a certain genetic problem onto other generations, and some have medical problems that would make the pregnancy more difficult than usual, or even harmful to the mothers health. These types of adoptive parents are ca ...
    Related: adoption, family problems, birth control, medical care, homosexual
  • Juvenile Delinquency - 1,394 words
    ... s a few important questions. What is being done to prevent this? And what are our governments (local and federally) doing to help? Money makes the world go round and without government help the many social workers, psychologists, counselors and doctors trying to help this situation would not be able to do their part. The juvenile justice system is funded by multiple sources (McNeece & Roberts, 1997). Almost no federal money is expended by juvenile courts to support ongoing operations, but demonstration projects are funded with grants from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. This appears to be changing som ...
    Related: delinquency, delinquency prevention, juvenile, juvenile crime, juvenile delinquency, juvenile detention, juvenile justice
  • Lost Boy - 1,854 words
    Lost Boy Dave Peltzer the author of The Lost Boy tells his story from the time he left his abusive mother and alcoholic father, through his experiences in five foster homes and juvenile detention, and how he eventually made it into the Air Force. He was a defiant, rebellious boy who, despite his background and personality, managed to endear himself to many guardians, social workers, and teachers. Pelzer writes in an honest, sometimes rambling, style; he is never bitter, and his story will find many sympathetic readers. The main purpose for Dave to write this book is to show at what lengths children and adolescents have gone to over come the unmentionable hardships of and abusive family. The ...
    Related: juvenile detention, everyday life, bulimia nervosa, alcoholism, crisis
  • Mimicry In Nature - 1,440 words
    Mimicry In Nature THE GREAT IMPOSTERS Finding good day care can certainly pose a problem these days, unless, of course, you're an African widow bird. When it comes time for a female widow bird to lay her eggs, she simply locates the nest of a nearby Estrildid finch and surreptitiously drops the eggs inside. That's the last the widow bird ever sees of her offspring. But not to worry, because the Estrildid finch will take devoted care of the abandoned birds as if they were her own. And who's to tell the difference? Though adult widow birds and Estrildid finches don't look at all alike, their eggs do. Not only that, baby widow birds are dead ringers for Estrildid finch chicks, both having the s ...
    Related: sea anemones, sri lanka, foster care, african, clothing
  • None Provided - 654 words
    None provided Kristin McOlvin Commentary While reading the September 1999 issue of Social Work: Journal of the National Association of Social Workers, I came across an article entitled Symbolic Interactionism, African American Families and the Transracial Adoption Controversy. It was written by Leslie Doty Hollingsworth PhD, the assistant professor in the school of social work at the University of Michigan. The article claims that by using symbolic interactionism, it can be seen that African Americans are a unique and distinct cultural group and therefore adoption of African American children by families of a different race should only be allowed as an absolute last resort. I object strongly ...
    Related: different types, african american, foster care, norm, adoption
  • Rethinking Orphanges - 524 words
    Rethinking Orphanges Gina Magnanti Economics Edited by Richard B. McKenzie Reviewed by Jim Powell Nowadays, it is considered acceptable to send a young person from a supportive, wealthy family away to a residential boarding school. At the same time it is considered destructive to send a young person from an unsafe, unhealthy home to a nurturing, educational, residential setting. As a result of old orphanage stereotypes in the past, many residential education programs have shut down during the past four or five decades. Most of these stereotypes werent helped by such examples as shown in Charles Dickens's novel Oliver Twist. Major newsmagazines supported these popular stereotypes with turn-of ...
    Related: rethinking, policy debate, national policy, newt gingrich, volume
  • Single Adoption - 1,360 words
    Single Adoption Should Single Individuals be Allowed to Adopt There are some conflicts concerning whether or not single individuals are capable to adopt. This paper discusses why singles have the need to adopt. It also discusses some issues they may encounter when considering adoption. In addition, provided is my personal opinion as to why I believe single parents should be able to adopt. The desire to raise a family and nurture a child is common among both married couples and singles. Single individuals may wish to adopt a child in order to fulfill their need to nurture. They may feel as though their life may be incomplete and therefore consider adopting a child. One single commented I had ...
    Related: adoption, single parent, york city, marital status, emotionally
  • Spirit Catches You - 854 words
    Spirit Catches You In the book "The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down" by Anne Fadiman, a child named Lia Lee is taken away from her parents by Child Protective Services and placed in foster care. Because they arent giving her medication for epilepsy. Although resulting in some medical benefits those benefits were lost because of destructive psychological and emotional damage to Lia. Dr. Neil Ernst decided to call child protective services when Lia Lees parents Nou Kou and Foua were reluctant to give her her medicine. Dr. Neil Ernst said: "I felt it was important for these Hmongs to understand that there were certain elements of medicine that we understood better than they did and that th ...
    Related: catches, language barriers, foster care, child protective, acceptable
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