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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: american women

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  • African American Women And Music - 1,702 words
    African American Women and Music The purpose of this report was for me to research and explore the connection between African American women and music. Since prior to the slave decades, music has been an integral part of African American society, and served as a form of social, economic, and emotional support in African American communities in the past and present. This paper will cover three different types of secular music that emerged during the slave days, through the civil war, reconstruction, and depression periods. They are blues, jazz, and gospel music. Each of these forms of music are still in existence today. In addition to exploring the history of each of these genres of music, th ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american jazz, american society, american women, black women
  • American Women During World War Ii - 1,808 words
    ... ing the war years for many men hoped that marriage would defer conscription to the war. This alone suggests that women's roles as wives and mothers were still dominant during the war because the nation witnessed a 25 percent rise in the population aged five and under. The popularity of marriage and the traditional gender roles that marriage carried, was exploited during the war. For example, the Office of War Information, established in the summer of 1942, worked closely with the media. President Roosevelt soon denied the OWI was being used for propaganda , yet only months after the OWI was formed, wartime propaganda began to likened women's war work to domestic chores. These trends serv ...
    Related: after world, american, american politicians, american propaganda, american society, american women, black women
  • American Women During Wwii - 1,832 words
    American Women During Wwii American Women During World War II. America's entry into World War II posed opportunities for American women domestically, yet paradoxically heightened fears in the polity about the exact role that women should adopt during wartime. A central issue that dominated women's lives during this period was how to combine the private sphere of the home, with the new demands of the war economy in the public sphere. Women made significant gains in the military, the war economy and in some cases, in terms of political influence. Yet these gains were misleading for policy makers utilised the female workforce for short-term gains during war, with a long-term goal of seeing wome ...
    Related: american, american society, american women, black women, employed women, married women, men and women
  • American Women During Wwii - 1,810 words
    ... during the war years for many men hoped that marriage would defer conscription to the war. This alone suggests that women's roles as wives and mothers were still dominant during the war because the nation witnessed a 25 percent rise in the population aged five and under. The popularity of marriage and the traditional gender roles that marriage carried, was exploited during the war. For example, the Office of War Information, established in the summer of 1942, worked closely with the media. President Roosevelt soon denied the OWI was being used for propaganda , yet only months after the OWI was formed, wartime propaganda began to likened women's war work to domestic chores. These trends ...
    Related: american, american history, american politicians, american propaganda, american society, american women, black women
  • Comparing The Daily Lives Of African American Women In The 1940s And Today - 1,960 words
    Comparing The Daily Lives Of African American Women In The 1940S And Today Comparing the Daily Lives of African American Women in the 1940s and Today For much of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in America, Black women were an after-thought in our nation's history. They were the mammies and maids, the cooks and caregivers, the universal shoulder to cry on in times of trouble. Often overlooked and undervalued, Black women were just ... there. African American women have come a long way. In the 1940s, women were treated as second-class citizens and Blacks faced discrimination everywhere they looked. They were not taught to be proud of being Black (Dressier, 1985). They had a hard time go ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american women, black women, comparing, daily life
  • Comparing The Daily Lives Of African American Women In The 1940s And Today - 1,840 words
    ... acy arises in a racially conscious society where Black women and Black men are still struggling with how to present their physical image and still be accepted in the society. It is very complex trying to negotiate your self-acceptance through two opposing cultures. Advertising in the 1930s had an impact on how African Americans defined themselves, particularly African American women. It is still the same more than 60 years later (Brown & Lieberson, 2000). Advertisers have successfully exploited the self-image of Black men and women. To be Black, especially if you were particularly dark, was loaded with negative stereotypes. Several products, promising miraculous transformations, were man ...
    Related: african, african american, afro american, american, american history, american journal, american life
  • A Magazine Is Not A Mirror Have You Ever Seen Anyone In A Magazine That Looked Even Vaguely Like You Looking Back Most Magazi - 691 words
    A magazine is not a mirror. Have you ever seen anyone in a magazine that looked even vaguely like you looking back? Most magazines are made to sell a fantasy of what we're supposed to be. They reflect what society deems to be a standard, however unattainable that standard is. That doesn't mean you should cancel your subscription. Women need to remember that it's just ink on the paper. Whatever standards you set for yourself: how much you weigh, how hard you work out, or how many times you make it to the gym should be your standards, not someone else's. Magazines portray unrealistic images and women need to learn to accept themselves. Women are now risking their health for the sake of beauty. ...
    Related: magazine, mirror, average american, modern society, dress
  • A Pair Of Tickets By Amy Tan - 699 words
    A Pair of Tickets by Amy Tan A Pair of Tickets by Amy Tan Amy Tan is an author who uses the theme of Chinese-American life, focusing mainly on mother-daughter relationships, where the mother is an immigrant from China and the daughter is a thoroughly Americanized --yellow on the surface and white underneath. In her book, the mother tries to convey their rich history and legacy to her daughter, who is almost completely ignorant of their heritage, while the daughter attempts to understand her hopelessly old- fashioned mother, who now seems to harbor a secret wisdom, who, in the end, is right about everything all along. At the opening of the story "A Pair of Tickets" Jandale Woo and her father ...
    Related: pair, main character, young women, chinese culture, train
  • Abortion - 2,032 words
    Abortion Abortion in today's society has become very political. You are either pro-choice or pro-life, and there doesn't seem to be a happy medium. As we look at abortion and research its history, should it remain legal in the United States, or should it be outlawed to reduce the ever growing rate of abortion. A choice should continue to exist but the emphasis needs to be placed on education of the parties involved. James C. Mohr takes a good look at abortion in his book Abortion in America. He takes us back in history to the 1800s so we can understand how the practice and legalization of abortion has changed over the year. In the absence of any legislation whatsoever on the subject of abort ...
    Related: abortion, induced abortion, court cases, civil war, affluent
  • Abortion - 1,190 words
    Abortion Almost half of American women have terminated at least one pregnancy, and millions more Americans of both sexes have helped them, as partners, parents, health-care workers, counselors, friends. Collectively, it would seem, Americans have quite a bit of knowledge and experience of abortion. Yet the debate over legal abortion is curiously abstract: we might be discussing brain transplants. Farfetched analogies abound: abortion is like the Holocaust, or slavery; denial of abortion is like forcing a person to spend nine months intravenously hooked up to a medically endangered stranger who happens to be a famous violinist. It sometimes seems that the further abortion is removed from the ...
    Related: abortion, abortion debate, legalizing abortion, nineteenth century, control laws
  • Abortion Clinics Should Not Be Closed - 1,231 words
    Abortion Clinics Should Not Be Closed $115 Designer Cosmetic Collection From Cosmetique -- Only $1! Abortion Clinics Should Not Be Closed In 1973, the Supreme Courts decision made it possible for women to get safe, legal abortions from well-trained medical surgeons, and therefore led to dramatic decreases in pregnancy-related injury and death ("abortion"). Now there is a new proposal to close abortion clinics. This proposal takes away the privacy rights of American women that are guaranteed by our Constitution. By closing abortion clinics the government is not only taking away womens rights, but is also punishing those whom want to exercise their right of a pro-choice woman. Abortion clinics ...
    Related: abortion, privacy rights, another country, health care, pro-choice
  • Abortion Clinics Should Not Be Closed In The Us - 1,242 words
    Abortion Clinics Should Not be Closed in the U.S. Let American Consumer Counseling Help you Get Out of Debt! Abortion Clinics Should Not be Closed in the U.S. In 1973, the Supreme Courts decision made it possible for women to get safe, legal abortions from well-trained medical surgeons, and therefore led to dramatic decreases in pregnancy-related injury and death ("abortion"). Now there is a new proposal to close abortion clinics. This proposal takes away the privacy rights of American women that are guaranteed by our Constitution. By closing abortion clinics the government is not only taking away womens rights, but is also punishing those whom want to exercise their right of a pro-choice wo ...
    Related: abortion, rape victims, liberties union, american consumer, constitution
  • Abortion Pill: Medical Advance Or Setback - 680 words
    Abortion Pill: Medical Advance Or Setback? The subject of abortion has created some of the most controversial, social, and moral debates in United States history. On Jan. 22, 1973, in the case Roe Vs. Wade, the Supreme Court ruled that it was a woman's constitutional right to have an abortion during the first trimester of the pregnancy (The Ruling). Still other interest groups argue that human life begins at conception and having an abortion is murder to an unborn child. These opposing viewpoints create a delicate political and social debate in which the lives of unborn children are placed in the center. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved the RU 486 "abort ...
    Related: abortion, advance, setback, human life, first trimester
  • Adolescent Sexuality - 1,525 words
    Adolescent Sexuality Adolescent Sexuality Sexuality is an important aspect of development during adolescence. The ability to identify and communicate with adolescent who may be at high risk of premature activity is important since sexual intercourse at an early age can have serious short and long-term consequences. An emphasis of confidentiality and an honest appraisal of implications of early sexual activity will enhance discussions about sexual issues with adolescents. Some parents are ill prepared for discussions about sexuality. Having conversations with their adolescent on sexuality may be difficult for them. Many adolescents claim both experience and confidence about sexual issues, the ...
    Related: adolescent, adolescent boys, adolescent girls, human sexuality, sexuality
  • Affirmative Action - 1,719 words
    Affirmative Action Affirmative action was established as part of society's efforts to address continuing problems of discrimination; the empirical evidence presented in the preceding chapter indicates that it has had some positive impact on remedying the effects of discrimination. Whether such discrimination lingers today is a central element of an analysis of affirmative action. The conclusion is clear: discrimination and exclusion remain all too common. 4.1. Evidence of Continuing Discrimination There has been undeniable progress in many areas. Nevertheless, the evidence is overwhelming that the problems affirmative action seeks to address -- widespread discrimination and exclusion and the ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, american women, high school, management
  • Alexis De Tocqueville - 1,161 words
    Alexis De Tocqueville The Education of Women in America Tonry Hughes December 5, 2000 Politics 1311 In America women are given the opportunity to have an education. Not just an average education, but one that helps them throughout their life by giving them the knowledge to protect themselves. In chapter 9 of Democracy in America Tocqueville believes that the education of American women is superior to that of French women. He believes that our form of education is necessary to protect women from the dangers that the world holds, and to help out our country politically by giving women the tools to raise a moral family. By raising families with good morals all of America will also be moral. Asi ...
    Related: alexis, tocqueville, political system, american history, choosing
  • American Revolution - 1,425 words
    American Revolution Among the many complex factors that contributed to instigating the American Revolution, two stand out most clearly: Englands imposition of taxation on the colonies and the failure of the British to gain consent of those being governed, along with the military measures England took on the colonists. Adding to these aforementioned factors were the religious and political legacy of the colonies, and the restriction of civil liberties by the British. Parliamentary taxation was undoubtedly one of the greatest factors inspiring the American public to rebel in the years leading up to the American Revolution. One of the most striking examples of this kind of taxation was the Stam ...
    Related: american, american public, american revolution, american women, british army
  • Angelou, Maya - 780 words
    Angelou, Maya Sergejs Golubevs. Mrs.Dunton. Engl.82 Maya Angelou. Maya Angelou, born April 4, 1928 as Marguerite Johnson in St. Louis, was raised in segregated rural Arkansas. She is a poet, historian, author, actress, playwright, civil-rights activist, and director. She has been working at Wake Forest University in north Carolina since 1981.She has published ten best selling books and numerous magazine articles earning her Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award nomination. At the request of President Clinton, she wrote and delivered a poem at his 1993 presidential inauguration. Whole her life, Maya Angelou has been trying to make something special in the poetry, history and in the film indu ...
    Related: angelou maya, maya, tv series, i know why the caged bird sings, collaboration
  • Animal Testing - 1,131 words
    ... rted to research facilities, and they suffered from cramping and over heating. The lack of adequate ventilation and extremes in temperature caused death to over 55 percent of the guinea pigs, hamsters and rabbits on their way to the research laboratory. This is not an isolated case, every year in Britain alone millions of animals suffer and die in laboratory experiments. They are burnt, scalded, poisoned and starved, given electric shocks and addicted to drugs, they are subjected to near freezing temperatures, reared in total darkness from birth and deliberately inflicted with disease like arthritis, cancer, diabetes, oral infections, stomach ulcers, syphilis, herpes and AIDS, (Sharpe, 1 ...
    Related: animal experimentation, animal research, animal testing, testing, using animals
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,685 words
    Anorexia Nervosa Eating disorders are a cause for serious concern from both a psychological and a nutritional point of view. They are often a complex expression of underlying problems with identity and self concept. These disorders often stem from traumatic experiences and are influenced by society`s attitudes toward beauty and worth (Eating Disorder Resource Center, 1997). Biological factors, family issues, and psychological make-up may be what people who develop eating disorders are responding to. Anyone can be affected by eating disorders, regardless of their socioeconomic background (Eating Disorder Resource Center, 1997). Anorexia nervosa is one such disorder characterized by extreme we ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, body image, serious concern
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