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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: american values

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  • American Values Are A Tricky Thing It Seems That The Value Set Changes With Each Individual American Pragmatism Is Actually R - 1,378 words
    American values are a tricky thing. It seems that the value set changes with each individual. American pragmatism is actually rooted in deeply held anti-authoritarian, individualistic, egalitarian, activist ideals, which privilege personal choice, flexibility, and technical efficiency with the pursuit of success, however success is defined. (Hall, Lindholm, pg. 91) Basically, an individual's values are what that individual decides they are. The key to understanding this is realizing that above almost all else, Americans prize, value, and recognize the sacredness of being an individual. Certainly there are basic expectations of all people living in American society regardless of how the indiv ...
    Related: american, american society, american values, pragmatism, personal choice
  • American Values Are A Tricky Thing It Seems That The Value Set Changes With Each Individual American Pragmatism Is Actually R - 1,367 words
    ... n to the road Tuesday mornings, in the summer the lawn is mowed, and the pool is maintained. For seven months out of the year, they earn enough money to buy all the beer they can drink, a few nice presents for their current women and keep themselves in clean clothes. Five months out of the year, my brothers live as paupers, no money, old clothes, and no women because they have no money. But if you asked my brothers if they disliked the five months that they had no money they would look at you as if you were speaking a foreign language. Why do they need money? They have a warm place to sleep, food to eat, and their family, what else do they need? If they want a beer they go visit a friend ...
    Related: american, american revolution, american society, american values, pragmatism
  • American Dream - 847 words
    American Dream America, our great country, is strong, powerful, and influential. Americans exemplify positive values, selflessness, hospitality, and the American way of life. The mighty oak tree that stands taller, bigger, and older than all others best represents this grand country. Each part of the tree illustrates a facet of our nation. Shapely emerald leaves covering the tree symbolize the values many Americans hold concerning themselves, others, and their nation. Leaves help the tree grow and flourish just as our value of caring for our neighbors help us to unite and become more successful as a whole. The beautiful shade and distinct shape of these leaves make the tree more attractive a ...
    Related: american, american dream, american life, american values, dream
  • Applied Nostalgia - 2,248 words
    Applied Nostalgia Applied Nostalgia--A Parental Look Back Without past memories, Americans lack a standard to base present conditions upon. These memories lie carefully shuffled and categorized in the giant shifter called the brain to crudely approximate the present standard of life. They hope to draw gratification and fulfillment in the progression of the quality of their and especially their children's lives. This innate desire to compare the past to the present drives personal and political decisions, especially conservatives who advocate a change to the policies and values of the past. Today, the faded memories of an emerging group of parents of their post-World War II upbringing, like c ...
    Related: last year, equal rights, world war ii, prepare, california
  • Bill Of Rights - 821 words
    Bill Of Rights The Bill of Rights In the summer of 1787, delegates from the 13 states convened in Philadelphia and drafted a remarkable blueprint for self-government, the Constitution of the United States. The first draft set up a system of checks and balances that included a strong executive branch, a representative legislature and a federal judiciary. The Constitution was remarkable, but deeply flawed. For one thing, it did not include a specific declaration, or bill, of individual rights. It specified what the government could do but did not say what it could not do. For another, it did not apply to everyone. The consent of the governed meant propertied white men only. The Bill of Rights ...
    Related: bill of rights, individual rights, early american, foreign affairs, pamphlet
  • Blowback, And American Foreign Policy - 875 words
    Blowback, And American Foreign Policy BLOWBACK, AND AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY America prides itself on being the world's largest superpower, and the American public rarely hears about wrongdoings made by the American government. On the occasional occurrence when the media has delivered such controversial news, it is gone before the public really has a chance to absorb all the information. American foreign policy is often times possibly doing more harm than good to foreign nations and the way in which certain matters are handled reflects on the American nation as a whole. In Chalmers Johnson's book, BLOWBACK, he criticizes the American government for not taking full responsibility for its actio ...
    Related: american, american foreign, american foreign policy, american government, american military, american nation, american public
  • Bushs Claim To The Presidency - 1,706 words
    Bush's Claim To The Presidency Today's leading news stories range from sports to overseas affairs, and from these Americans must decide what is important to our nation. Governor George W. Bush tries to make this decision a little easier in his announcement of candidacy on June 12, 1999 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Like most candidates in an election, Bush's main purpose is to present his ideas to a large audience and convince them that he is the man that can change the presidency. Governor Bush offers his opinion on free trade, our current military power, and drawing a moral line in politics. Bush speaks elegantly to his intended audience, which consists of his loyal supporters and those intereste ...
    Related: george w. bush, presidency, american flag, american ideal, drawing
  • Communism In The American Education System - 1,438 words
    Communism In The American Education System -Heather McIntyre Senior Seminar 17 January 2001 Communism in the American Education System At the height of the Cold War, a new cartoon emerged. Little blue people called Smurfs sang and skipped into the hearts of the American populace. The good, clean antics of the Smurfs were the model of American values, or were they? One should look closely at the Smurfs, their values, their cultures. Surprise! The Smurfs were not capitalistic at all. They were Communists! Communist practices and doctrine have not only infiltrated American television, but they have also become integral parts of America itself. Communism has even become a part of the American ed ...
    Related: american, american association, american education, american government, american television, american values, communism
  • Compare And Contrast - 970 words
    Compare And Contrast Bridging the Generation Gap Between Teens in the 60s and Teens in the 90s Throughout history many generations have been named after something that describes them in every way. The decade from 1960 to 1970 is definitely one of those eras and it became known as the Counter Culture Era (The Hippie Generation). It was known as the Counter Culture Era because the young people involved in it rejected the old-fashioned American values and lifestyles. The youth was no longer satisfied with being replicas of the generation that preceded them. Instead, young people longed for change. The changes affected lifestyles, values, laws, education, and entertainment. The dream of love, pe ...
    Related: compare, compare and contrast, contrast, social issues, transmitted diseases
  • Conceptions Of Divorce - 1,194 words
    Conceptions Of Divorce Conceptions of Divorce Is marriage no more than the result of voluntary agreements between two private individuals? Is the lack of detail concerning marriage arrangements causing all the divorce debates? Does divorce cause problems or solve them? Why is marriage such a religious experience and divorce such a legal experience? Why do marriages take place under the eyes of God while divorces take place under the eyes of the law? I believe that it was because of my parents' divorce that I have chosen to tackle such a controversial topic. In many ways, I am in search of my own opinion. My parents divorced through the no-fault system. My dad decided it was time to move on t ...
    Related: divorce, divorce laws, marriage divorce, marriage and family, different ways
  • Daeth Of A Salesman - 1,171 words
    Daeth Of A Salesman Michael Neppl Page 1 June 17 1999 In the play, Death of a Salesman , Arthur Miller depicts a typical dysfunctional family. This is Arthur Miller's best-known and most important problem play. It is a symbolic and in part expressionistic, and it challenges the American values concerning success. Willy Loman is a salesman who after thirty-four years of being on the road, is slowly starting to deteriorate physically as well as mentally. Upon his being fired, Willy tries to understand why he has failed as a salesman, a father, and as a husband. The word dysfunction defined according to The American Heritage Dictionary is abnormal or impaired functioning. This definition paints ...
    Related: death of a salesman, salesman, salesman arthur miller, listening skills, biff willy
  • Death Of Salesman - 1,166 words
    Death Of Salesman In the play, " Death of a Salesman" , Arthur Miller depicts a typical dysfunctional family. This is Arthur Miller's best-known and most important problem play. It is a symbolic and in part expressionistic, and it challenges the American values concerning success. Willy Loman is a salesman who after thirty-four years of being on the road, is slowly starting to deteriorate physically as well as mentally. Upon his being fired, Willy tries to understand why he has failed as a salesman, a father, and as a husband. The word "dysfunction" defined according to The American Heritage Dictionary is "abnormal or impaired functioning". This definition paints a perfect picture of the dai ...
    Related: death of a salesman, salesman, salesman arthur miller, family problems, biff willy
  • Democracy In America - 1,107 words
    ... s rampant and no one seems to care if justice or punishment is served or not. Many are very disillusioned with the government and think it is easier to do nothing than to become involved and try to change it. This is in direct relation to de Tocquevilles notion that democracies have a tendency to lose liberty and personal interest as the country grows larger. Not only with more people are there bound to be more differing ideas, but more people who share them, creating more voiced dissonance in the political sphere. This dissonance is glossed over when still in the minority. "[T]he tyranny of the majority" is one of de Tocquevilles main concerns with democratic nations. When a government ...
    Related: america, century america, democracy, democracy in america, first century
  • Divorce And Faults - 972 words
    Divorce And Faults The divorce is a legal ending of a marriage. It occurs when two spouses feel that a legal separation is the only way to put an end to their problems such as, differences in goals, financial difficulties, or poor sexual relationships. However, most people, when thinking about divorce, worry about the impact that it has on their children that are involved. Besides, a reason that at least half of our marriage fail is divorce laws. There have been many laws concerning divorce enforced in the United States that allow a quicker processing time. Maggie Gallagher, an affiliate scholar at the Institute for American Values, appointed about law in divorce such as why makes divorce ea ...
    Related: divorce, divorce laws, divorce rate, business contract, people believe
  • Emily Dickinson And Walt Whitman - 448 words
    Emily Dickinson And Walt Whitman Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman are two of literatures greatest innovators, they each changed the face of American literature. they are also considered one of literatures greatest pair of opposites. Dickinson is a timid wreck loose. While Whitman was very open and sociable, Whitman shares the ideas of William Cullen Bryant, everyone and everything is somehow linked by a higher bond. Both Whitman and Dickinson were decades ahead of their time, sharing only the universality of their works. Whitmans works always express his feelings of equality towards all mankind "For every atom belonging to me as good to you"(Whitman 347). Whitman exemplifies the American val ...
    Related: dickinson, emily, emily dickinson, walt, walt whitman, whitman
  • Ernest Hemingway The Man And His Work - 1,238 words
    Ernest Hemingway - The Man And His Work Ernest Hemingway - The Man and His Work On July 2, 1961, a writer whom many critics call the greatest writer of this century, a man who had a zest for adventure, a winner of the Nobel Prize and the Pulitzer Prize, a man who held esteem everywhere - on that July day, that man put a shotgun to his head and killed himself. That man was Ernest Hemingway. Though he chose to end his life, his heart and soul lives on through his many books and short stories. Hemingway's work is his voice on how he viewed society, specifically American society and the values it held. No other author of this century has had such a general and lasting influence on the generation ...
    Related: ernest, ernest hemingway, hemingway, american life, francis macomber
  • Foreign Trade In 90s - 1,055 words
    Foreign Trade In 90s The advances of the technological revolution have molded the evolution of the United States foreign trade in the 1990s and into the new millennium. Globalization has become the credo for the Clinton administration, and the booming American economy has done nothing but strongly bolster this approach. Globalizations foothold in American policy really began in the much-debated North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which was finally passed in 1994. NAFTA specifically said one of its goals was to "contribute to the harmonious development and expansion of world trade and provide a catalyst to broader international cooperation". However at the time that was hardly the ca ...
    Related: foreign trade, free trade, north american free trade agreement, states foreign, trade agreement, trade organization, trade relations
  • Geopolitics - 1,575 words
    ... barrel infected by one rotten one, the corruption of Greece would infect Iran and all to the east. It would also carry infection to Africa through Asia Minor and Egypt, and to Europe through Italy, France, already threatened by the strongest domestic Communist parties in Western Europe (Acheson, 1969). Presenting "apples in a barrel" is a mark of excessive pride in the American intellectuals of statecraft with the Truman administration. Thus when Truman declares in his speech that it is "necessary only to glance at a map," the map he has in his mind is one where states are equivalent to dominoes about to fall. Only physical proximity is seen as geography and nothing else. The geopolitica ...
    Related: geopolitics, third world, soviet military, military technology, rapid
  • George Bush - 619 words
    George Bush George Bush Forty-First President 1989-1993 George Bush brought to the White House a dedication to traditional American values and a determination to direct them toward making the United States a kinder and gentler nation. In his Inaugural Address he pledged in a moment rich with promise to use American strength as a force for good. Coming from a family with a tradition of public service, George Herbert Walker Bush felt the responsibility to make his contribution both in time of war and in peace. Born in Milton, Massachusetts, on June 12, 1924, he became a student leader at Phillips Academy in Andover. On his 18th birthday he enlisted in the armed forces. The youngest pilot in th ...
    Related: bush, george bush, george herbert, george herbert walker bush, president bush, walker bush
  • Great Gatsby Thesis - 1,756 words
    Great Gatsby Thesis Fitzgerald's dominant theme in The Great Gatsby focuses on the corruption of the American Dream. By analyzing high society during the1920s through the eyes of narrator Nick Carraway, the author reveals that the American Dream has transformed from a pure ideal of security into a convoluted scheme of materialistic power. In support of this message, Fitzgerald highlights the original aspects as well as the new aspects of the American Dream in his tragic story to illustrate that a once impervious dream is now lost forever to the American people. The foundation qualities of the American Dream depicted in The Great Gatsby are perseverance and hope. The most glorified of these c ...
    Related: gatsby, great gatsby, jay gatsby, the great gatsby, thesis
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