Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: forensic

  • 51 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • Evolution Of Forensic Psychology 300 Level Undergraduate - 1,573 words
    Evolution Of Forensic Psychology (300 Level Undergraduate) The discipline of clinical psychology is evolving. Clinical psychologists are no longer limited to couches and working out of their own offices. They are now being put in the stand in courtrooms all over the world. Not because they are on trial themselves, however. Rather, they are there to share their expertise in areas that involve an individual in legal matters. The field of forensic psychology has grown in the 21st century because courtrooms recognize the value of psychologists testimonies to help juries reach a clearer verdict. Not only that, but psychologists can help identify competence to stand trial, perform psychological au ...
    Related: clinical psychology, evolution, forensic, psychology, undergraduate
  • Forensic Psychology - 528 words
    Forensic Psychology Part I: The Job Forensic Psychology is the application of the science and profession of psychology to questions and issues relating to law and the legal system. The word forensic comes from the Latin word forensis, meaning of the forum, where the law courts of ancient Rome were held. Today forensic refers to the application of scientific principles and practices to the adversary process where specially knowledgeable scientists play a role. There are several types of Forensic Psychologists although most fall into three different categories, criminal investigation, courtroom experts, and/or correctional psychiatrists. I decided to focus on the criminal aspect since it inter ...
    Related: abnormal psychology, child psychology, developmental psychology, forensic, psychology, social psychology
  • Forensic Science - 1,504 words
    Forensic Science Megan Malone CRJU 235 TR 12:30-1:45 12-09-99 Forensic Science and Investigations The word forensic basically means the key to solve a crime. Science is the technology used to help forensic teams to analyze and solve crimes. What can look obvious to the naked eye could actually be a whole other story. Hair samples can determine many things about a person or animal when collected from forensics. There are many job opportunities with a good salary and many openings within the job. This paper will discuss a case where forensic science is needed and how crucial it is in any case. When arriving at the crime scene Geberth (1997) notes that there are certain procedures the investiga ...
    Related: forensic, forensic science, science, blood type, legal issues
  • Forensic Science: Proper Crime Scene Techniques - 1,612 words
    Forensic Science: Proper Crime Scene Techniques. The word "Forensic" is derived from the Latin forensus, meaning "of the forum."1 In ancient Rome, the forum was where governmental debates were held, but it was also where trials were held -- the court house. From that, forensic science has come to mean the application of the natural and physical science to the resolution of matters within a legal context2. Forensic Science can be viewed as a tripartite structure consisting of 1. Collection: which pertains to the science investigation, 2. Examination: which pertains to the medical investigation and 3. Presentation: which pertains to the courts. A forensic case will involve all aspects of each ...
    Related: crime, crime scene, crime scene investigation, forensic, forensic science, scene investigation
  • Forensic Science: Proper Crime Scene Techniques - 1,612 words
    Forensic Science: Proper Crime Scene Techniques. The word "Forensic" is derived from the Latin forensus, meaning "of the forum."1 In ancient Rome, the forum was where governmental debates were held, but it was also where trials were held -- the court house. From that, forensic science has come to mean the application of the natural and physical science to the resolution of matters within a legal context2. Forensic Science can be viewed as a tripartite structure consisting of 1. Collection: which pertains to the science investigation, 2. Examination: which pertains to the medical investigation and 3. Presentation: which pertains to the courts. A forensic case will involve all aspects of each ...
    Related: crime, crime scene, crime scene investigation, forensic, forensic science, scene investigation
  • Forensic Science: Proper Crime Scene Techniques - 1,612 words
    Forensic Science: Proper Crime Scene Techniques. The word "Forensic" is derived from the Latin forensus, meaning "of the forum."1 In ancient Rome, the forum was where governmental debates were held, but it was also where trials were held -- the court house. From that, forensic science has come to mean the application of the natural and physical science to the resolution of matters within a legal context2. Forensic Science can be viewed as a tripartite structure consisting of 1. Collection: which pertains to the science investigation, 2. Examination: which pertains to the medical investigation and 3. Presentation: which pertains to the courts. A forensic case will involve all aspects of each ...
    Related: crime, crime scene, crime scene investigation, forensic, forensic science, scene investigation
  • Ascertain Cause, Manner, And Time Of Death - 776 words
    Ascertain Cause, Manner, And Time Of Death Ascertain cause, Manner, and Time of Death The Presumptive Sings of Death include cessation of respiration, cessation of heartbeat, changes in the eyes, and cooling of the body. Positive signs of death indicate that death has occurred. This includes postmortem lividity, postmortem rigidity, instantaneous rigor, postmortem decomposition, and insect invasion. All of these signs of death can help you determine time, cause, and manor of death. Cessation of respiration is the apparent lack of breathing. In certain types of death like electrocution and drowning, the victim may not be breathing but life may still exist. To determine if breathing is occurri ...
    Related: ascertain, environmental factors, american history, cool, mouth
  • Association Of Certified Fraud Examiners - 904 words
    Association Of Certified Fraud Examiners Corporations are often the victims of the most common white-collar crimes that occur in corporate America. According to the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (cfenet.com), "abuse and fraud by employees cost U.S. organizations more than $400 billion annually ... [which equals] $9 per employee per day." These statistics show the corporate need for forensic accountants, there also is an immense demand for these specialized accountants in the private sector. For example a forensic accountant is used to "quantify economic loss" (askhal.com) in personal injury cases. Forensic accounting is " an accounting analysis that is suitable to the court, which ...
    Related: certified, fraud, police force, computer applications, explosion
  • Capital Punishment Edward Earl Johnson - 1,955 words
    Capital Punishment -Edward Earl Johnson Edward Earl Johnson was put in death row when he was eighteen. A documentary was made when he was twenty-six, called "fourteen days in May." Edward claimed all along that he was innocent yet he was still executed. The documentary showed he had lived for eight years at the Parchment state penitentiary, Mississippi (death row.) Edward was put to death row for the attempted rape of an elderly white woman and the murder of a white Marshall. The documentary tried to show his innocence, the process of this is what this essay will be about. The opening scenes from the documentary showed the Parchment State Penitentiary. You saw a large building inside of barb ...
    Related: capital punishment, earl, edward, johnson, punishment
  • Career Review: Pharmacist - 1,380 words
    Career Review: Pharmacist Introduction On the surface, daily routines of Pharmacists may appear to be rather simplified and involves little work hazard and responsibilities. As pharmacists dispense prescribed drug and medicine by doctors or dentists, they may provide assistance to those who seeks help with non-prescribed products. This is a correct yet very generalized view of pharmacist, this career interacts with many different industries. As an example, technology plays key role for pharmacist. Computer skill enables individual to make use of computer database constructed for patients prescriptions, thus ensuring efficient service and preventing potential risks such as harmful drug intera ...
    Related: pharmacist, york university, visual perception, social science, science
  • Celebrated Cases Of Judge Dee - 629 words
    Celebrated Cases Of Judge Dee Sung Yon Kim Asian Civilization Celebrated Cases of Judge Dee In by reading the Celebrated Cases of Judge Dee, I gained a perspective of the people and culture of China. This book showed the analysis of Chinese saw and the background of Chinese history. Judge Dee, during the Tang Dynasty, was a well-known statesman and a magistrate to a town called Chang-Ping. He was known to be a famous detective, in which he could solve all crimes. In the Celebrated Cases of Judge Dee, he is faced with three murders, which develop throughout the book. First of the three murders was the murder of the two silk merchants. Second was the sudden death of a young husband, and thirdl ...
    Related: forensic science, book reports, compare and contrast, luck, clever
  • Chappaquid Will The Truth Be Known - 1,823 words
    ... not state that he had been the driver. According to Gargan's testimony, all Kennedy said was The car has gone off the Bridge down by the beach and Mary Jo is in it. Stranger still is that there was no conversation between the three on the way to the Bridge, and that neither Gargan nor Markham appeared to have looked at Kennedy to see if he needed medical treatment. (When he had told Ray LaRosa to get Gargan and Markham, Kennedy was sitting in the back of a rented white Valiant, outside the Lawrence cottage). He remained in the back seat for the drive to the Bridge. Many investigators have questioned whether the vast amount of damage to the car, including dented passenger doors, dented r ...
    Related: saturday morning, attorney general, district attorney, fashion, oversight
  • Charles Manson: Methods To The Madness - 1,869 words
    Charles Manson: Methods To The Madness On the morning of August 9, 1969, three LAPD officers arrived at 10050 Cielo Drive (Bugliosi 7). The scene that awaited them was horrendous. In the driveway, in a parked car, the body of Steven Parent was found. He was shot four times and stabbed once. Laying about eighteen or twenty feet past the front door of the house, Voytek Frykowski had been shot twice, beaten over the head with a blunt object thirteen times, and stabbed fifty-one times. Also discovered on the lawn was coffee heiress Abigail Folger, stabbed twenty-eight times. Inside the home, in the living room, were the bodies of Jay Sebring and Sharon Tate. Sebring, a hair stylist, had been sta ...
    Related: charles manson, madness, saint joseph, highest level, eager
  • College Essay - 1,194 words
    College Essay The history of DNA use for forensic cases already spans more than a decade. The first cases into which DNA evidence was brought in were in England. The first case of using DNA-related evidence in Arizona courts was the 1988 murder of Jennifer Wilson by Richard Bible near Flagstaff. Blood found on the back of Bible's plaid shirt was identified through DNA testing as Jennifer's blood -- with a probability of 14 billion-to-1. Bible was subsequently convicted. This conviction was upheld unanimously by the Arizona Supreme Court. This together with other legal opinions elsewhere have paved the way for further use of DNA-related evidence in trials. National and international scrutiny ...
    Related: building blocks, vitro fertilization, supreme court, virtual, link
  • Crime Detection - 870 words
    Crime Detection In recent times, science has provided substantial aid to crime detection. Because anything in the physical universe has the potential of becoming an item of evidence in an investigation, a wide variety of procedures may be used in analyzing and interpreting evidence in a criminal case. These procedures include handwriting analysis, forensic photography, crime scene documentation, metallurgical investigations, chain of custody, entomology, and blood spatters. The first thing you do after securing a crime scene is document it. Always take pictures. They are the best records available. They show the crime scene as it was found; where objects are in relation to other objects, vic ...
    Related: crime, crime scene, detection, analytical chemistry, left handedness
  • Dissociative Identity Disorder And Abuse - 1,125 words
    Dissociative Identity Disorder And Abuse The condition once known as multiple personality disorder (MPD) is a very real psychological phenomenon that until recently was mis-understood and often mis-diagnosed. Dissociative identity disorder, DID, as we now call it, is a mental illness where a person's thoughts, feelings, and memories are scattered throughout two or more separate personalities within the victims mind (Appelbaum 107). In 1973 perhaps the world's most famous psychiatric patient ever, Sybil brought attention to what was until then a rare diagnoses. Sybil was ritually abused as a child and was later found to possess sixteen separate personalities, including women with English acce ...
    Related: abuse, child abuse, disorder, dissociative, dissociative disorders, dissociative identity, dissociative identity disorder
  • Dna - 1,551 words
    Dna DNA evidence is extremely helpful in criminal trials not only because it can determine the guilt of a suspect, but also because it can keep innocent people from going to jail. The suspect must leave a sample of their DNA at the crime scene in order for testing to occur, but DNA can be found in the form of many things such as semen, blood, hair, saliva, or skin scrapings. According to Newsweek, "thousands of people have been convicted by DNA's nearly miraculous ability to search out suspects across space and time ... hundreds of innocent people have also been freed, often after years behind bars, sometimes just short of the death chamber" (Adler ). Though some may think it is a waste of t ...
    Related: sex offenders, human nature, dna testing, indexes
  • Dna And Forensics - 1,198 words
    Dna And Forensics What is DNA? DNA (noun) [deoxyribonucleic acid] First appeared 1944 : any of various nucleic acids that are usually the molecular basis of heredity, are localized especially in cell nuclei, and are constructed of a double helix held together by hydrogen bonds between purine and pyrimidine bases which project inward from two chains containing alternate links of deoxyribose and phosphate. What is forensics? fo*ren*sic [1] (adjective) First appeared 1659 1 : belonging to, used in, or suitable to courts of judicature or to public discussion and debate. 2 : ARGUMENTATIVE, RHETORICAL. 3 : relating to or dealing with the application of scientific knowledge to legal problems *~ med ...
    Related: forensics, double helix, home office, american population, conventional
  • Dna Code - 1,076 words
    DNA Code Only a small fraction of our total DNA makes us different from gorillas, chimpanzees and other primates. An even smaller fraction makes one person different from the next. It's these differences that forensic DNA experts use to identify people and determine the source of biological evidence such as blood or semen found at a crime scene. DNA testing is powerful, sensitive and effective in pointing to the guilty and absolving the innocent. To date, 67 convicted felons have been exonerated nationwide based on DNA evidence. The vast majority of those have been rape cases. But DNA testing as it is now performed raises a question as to whether the public should fear that an innocent perso ...
    Related: civil liberties, human genome, personal information, procedure, scope
  • Dna Fingerprinting - 1,017 words
    Dna Fingerprinting DNA Fingerprinting DNA Fingerprinting is also referred to as DNA profiling and DNA typing. It was first developed as an identification technique in England in 1985. The original use was to expose the presence of any genetic diseases. About three years later it became used to identify criminals through the analysis of genetic material and to settle paternity disputes. It is still used for those reasons today. The DNA fingerprinting process is called gel electrophoresis. It is a process that can sort pieces of DNA according to its size. The process is done by taking samples of DNA from the crime scene and comparing it with samples from the accused. Samples are taken from bio ...
    Related: fingerprinting, microsoft encarta, genetic disease, multimedia encyclopedia, katie
  • 51 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3