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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: foreign relations

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  • Americas Growing Pains - 1,026 words
    America's Growing Pains Americas first two presidents, George Washington and John Adams, both resolutely adhered to the idea that America should endeavor to stay out of war at all times, and did everything in their power to evade declaring and entering into war. Throughout their reigns, war was ubiquitous in Europe, and many countries (especially Britain and France) made numerous attempts to obtain and secure Americas support. Washington and Adams both believed that America should not side with any foreign country during times of war making the fundamental purport of Americas first foreign policy the elusion of war at all costs. This policy was manifested throughout Washington and Adams invo ...
    Related: americas, north america, negative aspects, american people, seas
  • Andrew Jackson - 1,886 words
    Andrew Jackson The year was 1824. The election of this year was very unusual because of the number of candidates running for president. One of the candidates was Andrew Jackson, or Old Hickory as they called him, a general that had won the Battle of New Orleans(which was a battle not needed) in the War of 1812. Jackson became a hero after this war, and it would bring him all the way to the presidency. Another one of the candidates was John Quincy Adams. The son of John Adams, the second president of the United States, Adams was a excellent debator from New England. He was the only candidate from the NorthEast. The two other candidates were William Crawford and Henry Clay. Crawford, the secre ...
    Related: andrew, andrew jackson, jackson, electoral college, federal funds
  • Ap Us History - 1,259 words
    AP US History March 1, 1997 Period 4 Treaty of Versailles: Who was at fault for its denial? The Treaty of Versailles, which was a peace treaty that called for the end of World War 1(between Germany and the Allies), was defeated in the Senate by an unknown alliance of two forces. The two forces were President Wilsons all or nothing attitude and the strong opponents of the Treaty in the Senate. William Borah (Sen, Idaho), one of the irreconcilables, brings out a clear weakness in the Covenant of the League of Nations in his speech to the Senate. The weakness is that will any country really feel comfortable, or approve of, another countrys government dealing with their domestic affairs and conc ...
    Related: history, constitutional right, treaty of versailles, foreign relations, logical
  • Article Of Confederation - 965 words
    Article Of Confederation Articles of Confederation The ineffectiveness of the Articles of Confederation was pulling the country apart by the end of the 1780s. It needed improvement in each genre of its structure. In foreign policy, politically, and economically, the country was in a state of collapse. Politically, the writers of the Articles of Confederation forgot two of the three-branch government, the executive and judicial branches. In foreign policy, the country was not respect by any of its peers and could not create an effective treaty. Finally, economic stability was non-existent. The country could not collect taxes, pay debts, or trade effectively. Amidst the chaos, there were few s ...
    Related: articles of confederation, confederation, legislative branch, john jay, statehood
  • Articles Of Confederation - 409 words
    Articles of Confederation Articles of Confederation As the first written constitution of the United States, the Articles of Confederation created a legislature where each state was represented equally. The Congress had jurisdiction over foreign relations with the authority to form alliances and make treaties, make war and peace, sustain an army and navy, coin money, establish a postal service, create admiralty courts, and settle disputes between states. Thus, the power vested in Congress allowed it to operate with moderate control over the states. Another successful point was in the allowance of equal votes in Congress for each state and the decree that most decisions be decided by majority ...
    Related: articles of confederation, confederation, postal service, effective management, constitution
  • Articles Of Confederation - 565 words
    Articles of Confederation Articles of Confederation Analyze the degree to which the Articles provided an effective form of government with respect to any two of the following: Foreign Relations, Economic Conditions, or Western Lands. In 1777, the states enacted the Articles of Confederation to preserve democracy and prevent tyranny from those who sought to centralize power. But in their efforts to keep their independence, the states created a weak central government that was unable to improve an insolvent economy and poor foreign relations. Although the confederation gained some substantial powers, the crucial powers to tax and regulate commerce remained with the individual states. Each stat ...
    Related: articles of confederation, confederation, judicial system, thomas paine, arthur
  • Birth Of Communication - 2,382 words
    Birth Of Communication Outline I. It is important to reflect one's own national and cultural identity to understand what is different among people of different nations. History teaches us that culture always changes because of internal or external influences, even our own cultures and values change over time. Our world today is a world in which people from different nations and cultures are getting closer and closer because of economical and political reasons. Because cultures are becoming closer, communication is the most important quality for anyone to work on if they want to work in the international society. The history of communication and the relationships that were formed in the early ...
    Related: communication technology, cross-cultural communication, cultural communication, intercultural communication, international communication
  • Birth Of Communication - 2,409 words
    ... the world was looking at America wondering what it would do next. As communication helped the word spread about this "land of opportunity" more and more people wanted to immigrate, or at least come to America to see what all the talk was about. Many Chinese and Japanese came to the United States and saw it first hand from the 1860's on (Iriye, 39). For the Chinese the personal meeting did not make as grand of an impression as it did for the Japanese. For example, the Japanese were almost desperately interested in learning more about the military strength and power that the West held. However, the Chinese government was perfectly happy with maintaining their status quo. Although it is dif ...
    Related: cultural communication, intercultural communication, international communication, cultural imperialism, greenwood press
  • Bitter Rivals: Henry Cabot Lodge And Woodrow Wilson - 1,033 words
    ... nd the new superpower status of the United States (Lafeber 314). Lodge grouped Wilson and Jefferson together in their mutual willingness to keep peace at all hazards (Widenor 203). While Lodge may have been correct in his argument that Wilson needed to back up American neutrality with some use of force, Wilsons interpretation of American neutrality leading up to World War I kept America from war as long as possible without compromising American national interests of trade and security. The rivalry between the two politicians escalated with Wilsons introduction of his 14 Points for Peace after World War I. As Wilson negotiated with other leaders of the Entente Powers after the war, the P ...
    Related: bitter, henry cabot lodge, lodge, wilson, woodrow, woodrow wilson
  • Blowback, And American Foreign Policy - 875 words
    Blowback, And American Foreign Policy BLOWBACK, AND AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY America prides itself on being the world's largest superpower, and the American public rarely hears about wrongdoings made by the American government. On the occasional occurrence when the media has delivered such controversial news, it is gone before the public really has a chance to absorb all the information. American foreign policy is often times possibly doing more harm than good to foreign nations and the way in which certain matters are handled reflects on the American nation as a whole. In Chalmers Johnson's book, BLOWBACK, he criticizes the American government for not taking full responsibility for its actio ...
    Related: american, american foreign, american foreign policy, american government, american military, american nation, american public
  • China And American Foreign Policy - 1,329 words
    China And American Foreign Policy China and American Foreign Policy Since the fall of the Soviet Union, the Cold War was over, making the U.S. the only superpower left in the world. This has made the international system much more tranquil, and relaxed. The only country potentially powerful besides the U.S., is China. Many Americans fear China, not only because they are communist, but also because of their huge population. Their population is 1.3 billion people, which accounts 1/5th of the worlds population. As one of the only potential superpowers in the world, it would be in the best interest of all Americans if the U.S. and China became allies, instead of enemies. Peace and development, e ...
    Related: american, american foreign, american foreign policy, china, foreign policy, foreign relations, south china
  • China Between The Fall Of The Kmt And Mao Tsetungs Death - 359 words
    China between the fall of the KMT and Mao Tse-Tung's death The time from 1949-1976 was a time of transition for China. Many social and economic changes occurred through this period. When the Kuomintang government collapsed and Mao Tse-Tung assumed control, this marked the beginning of massive reformation for what would become the People's Republic. With Mao Tse-Tung's rule came governmental reform which led to social betterment. His first years of rule included careful development and reorganization backed by Soviet support. The landlord class was wiped out with the nationwide land reform and the land was divided among the peasantry. Equality prevailed for women and attacks where made on off ...
    Related: china, people's republic of china, cultural revolution, korean war, peasantry
  • China Economic Growth - 2,074 words
    China Economic Growth Two years after the death of Mao Zedong in 1976, it became apparent to many of China's leaders that economic reform was necessary. During his tenure as China's premier, Mao had encouraged social movements such as the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution, which had as their bases ideologies such as serving the people and maintaining the class struggle. By 1978 "Chinese leaders were searching for a solution to serious economic problems produced by Hua Guofeng, the man who had succeeded Mao Zedong as CCP leader after Mao's death" (Shirk 35). Hua had demonstrated a desire to continue the ideologically based movements of Mao. Unfortunately, these movements had left ...
    Related: china, chinese economic, economic crisis, economic development, economic growth, economic performance, economic reform
  • China The Favored Nation - 1,709 words
    ... e United States by allowing United States to significantly reduce China's quotas if China violates the agreement through transshipments. Charges by the United States Customs Service of illegal transshipments by China have led the United States on separate occasions since the signing of the agreement to reduce China's textile and apparel quotas on specific products. The most recent incident occurred on September 6, 1996, when the U.S.T.R. announced that the United States would impose a $19 million dollar punitive charge against China's 1996 textile quota allowance due to China's repeated violations of the United States-China textile agreement dealing with illegal transshipments. China in ...
    Related: china, most favored nation, people's republic of china, foreign trade, intelligence gathering
  • Chinese Art During The Early Empire - 1,787 words
    Chinese Art During The Early Empire In this essay, I will look at the outpouring of thought, art and literature during the early empire. More so though, I will focus on what factors led to this renewed focus on culture in the early empire. It would seem that there were several factor which would lead to this renewed interest in culture in early China, but the most significant of these factors would be the re-establishment of a strong central government. This re-establishment of a strong central government laid the foundation for cultural growth. It brought with it prosperity to China, through improved infrastructure, such as the canals and graineries. As a result of these improvements, China ...
    Related: chinese, chinese art, chinese culture, chinese history, chinese people, chinese society, chinese tradition
  • Cuba - 378 words
    Cuba Demographics. Cuba is an island nation in the Caribbean, between the Caribbean Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean, 90 miles south of Florida. Cuba's population is 11,096,395 (July 1999 est.). Cuba's capitol is Havana, and Spanish is the language spoken there. Cuba's population is 51% mulatto, 37% white, 11% black and 1% Chinese. Economics. The economy in Cuba is dependant on the state, which controls virtually all foreign trade. Tourism is a major factor in Cuba's economy. Cuba's export commodities include sugar, nickel, tobacco, shellfish, citrus, medical products and coffee. Cuba's import commodities include petroleum, food, machinery, and chemicals. History: The Bay of Pigs Invasion an ...
    Related: cuba, soviet union, american medical, president kennedy, pigs
  • Cuba - 1,873 words
    Cuba Kennedy's Fixation with Cuba Thomas G. Paterson Thomas G. Paterson's essay, Kennedy's Fixation with Cuba, is an essay primarily based on the controversy and times of President Kennedy's foreign relations with Cuba. Throughout President Kennedy's short term, he devoted the majority of his time to the foreign relations between Cuba and the Soviet Union. After the struggle of WW II, John F. Kennedy tried to keep a tight strong hold over Cuba as to not let Cuba turn to the Communist Soviet Union. Kennedy seen Cuba and the Soviet Union as a major threat to the United States. As Castro fell farther and farther into the Communist party, he inched his way closer and closer to becoming a close a ...
    Related: cuba, medical care, white house, short term, mafia
  • Cubas Politics - 1,690 words
    Cuba`s Politics While the isle of Cuba was initially discovered on October 27, 1492 during one of Columbus first voyages, it wasnt actually claimed by Spain until the sixteenth century. However, its tumultuous beginnings as a Spanish sugar colony provides an insightful backdrop into the very essence of the countrys political and economic unrest. From its early revolutionary days to the insurrectional challenge of the Marxist-Leninist theories emerged the totalitarian regime under Fidel Castro in present day Cuba. Cuban colonial society was distinguished by the characteristics of colonial societies in general, namely a stratified, inegalitarian class system; a poorly differentiated agricultur ...
    Related: post cold, fidel castro, international community, mood, accelerated
  • Different Forms Of Government - 696 words
    Different Forms of Government Introduction The difference in the U.S. Government at it's founding vrs today in reference, to the idea of small vrs big government. The Government originally had only concern with the Military, tariffs and all forms of Foreign relations Today the government regulates all aspects of a persons life. Tax,the redistributation of wealth,healthcare and have a strong influence on local governments through the withholding funds. Competing Interest Inconsistencies in Government polices can be attributed to differences in the many different public Popular Majority will not remain stable for long, since no one can please everyone people will shift their support. Many diff ...
    Related: different forms, u.s. government, unemployment insurance, civil liberties, management
  • During The Winter Of 194647, The Worst In Memory, Europe Seemed On The - 1,734 words
    During the winter of 1946-47, the worst in memory, Europe seemed on the verge of collapse. For the victors in World War II, there were no spoils. In London, coal shortages left only enough fuel to heat and light homes for a few hours a day. In Berlin, the vanquished were freezing and starving to death. On the walls of the bombed-out Reichstag, someone scrawled Blessed are the dead, for their hands do not freeze. European cities were seas of rubble--500 million cubic yards of it in Germany alone. Bridges were broken, canals were choked, rails were twisted. Across the Continent, darkness was rising. Americans, for the most part, were not paying much attention. Having won World War II, most Ame ...
    Related: eastern europe, western europe, winter, secretary of state, after world
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