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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: food and drug administration

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  • 65279proposition 215timothy Daemon, At The Age Of 43 Is Just One Of The Few Individuals Who Suffer Fromaids He Is Constantly - 751 words
    PROPOSITION 215Timothy Daemon, at the age of 43 is just one of the few individuals who suffer fromAIDS. He is constantly being monitored by hospitals at all times, and must take manydifferent painkillers each day to help relieve his pain. Timothy takes over twenty pills a dayand is also suffering from malnutrition because of AIDS wasting syndrome, which is a lackof appetite. There is no cure for Timothy or others like him with AIDS, so what can be doneto ease their suffering? Is there any way we can help poor Timothy and others like him intheir pain? There is, and its called Proposition 215. Proposition 215 deals with thelegalization of marijuana for medical usage only. Under current Califor ...
    Related: attorney general, drug administration, california legislature, prop, barry
  • Abortion - 1,190 words
    ... he best conditions possible. Copyright 1975 by Seth Mydans. All rights reserved. http://www.theatantic/politics/abortion/myda.htm May 11th, 2000 At the same time, there begins to appear on the part of some an alarming readiness to subordinate rights of freedom of choice in the area of human reproduction to governmental coercion. Notwithstanding all this, we continue to maintain strict antiabortion laws on the books of at least four fifths of our states, denying freedom of choice to women and physicians and compelling the unwilling to bear the unwanted. Since, however, abortions are still so difficult to obtain, we force the birth of millions more unwanted children every year. to cut dow ...
    Related: abortion, abortion debate, partial birth abortion, partial-birth abortion, population growth
  • Abortion Pill: Medical Advance Or Setback - 680 words
    Abortion Pill: Medical Advance Or Setback? The subject of abortion has created some of the most controversial, social, and moral debates in United States history. On Jan. 22, 1973, in the case Roe Vs. Wade, the Supreme Court ruled that it was a woman's constitutional right to have an abortion during the first trimester of the pregnancy (The Ruling). Still other interest groups argue that human life begins at conception and having an abortion is murder to an unborn child. These opposing viewpoints create a delicate political and social debate in which the lives of unborn children are placed in the center. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved the RU 486 "abort ...
    Related: abortion, advance, setback, human life, first trimester
  • Aids As An Invader - 1,827 words
    Aids As An Invader Acquired immune deficiency syndrome, also known as AIDS, is a silent invader. The first cases of this disease were reported in the early 1980s. AIDS is caused by the infection known as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which is a microscopic organism that can grow and multiply inside living cells. HIV attacks and disables the bodys immune system. The immune system is the system that usually fights off illnesses. When the immune system breaks down, a person with AIDS will develop life-threatening illnesses. (Flynn & Lound, 6) The invasion of the AIDS virus in an individuals body leaves the body open to an invasion by many other different infections, called opportunistic d ...
    Related: aids, western europe, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, saharan africa, infected
  • Alcohol Tobacco Advertising On The Web - 1,210 words
    Alcohol & Tobacco Advertising On The Web As adults, how do we encourage our children to explore the rich resources of the Internet without exposing them to a steady stream of marketing massages, such as junk e-mail, sexually explicit material and hate-mail? This is a question that many people in our society, including parents and educators are struggling to answer. Although we have yet to reach a consensus on this matter, one possible solution is to filter or block this objectionable material from our children without interfering with the rights of adults to view and visit any Web site they like. When the US Supreme Court overturned the Communications Decency Act in June of 1997, industry an ...
    Related: advertising, advertising campaign, alcohol, big tobacco, online advertising, tobacco, tobacco advertising
  • Alzheimer's: Is There A Cure - 999 words
    Alzheimer'S: Is There A Cure? Alzheimer's: Is there a cure? In February of 2000, I lost my grandmother to Alzheimer's disease. She was diagnosed with the disease just less than two years prior to her death. Throughout that time, I watched changes in my grandmother that made her seem like an entirely different woman to me. She gradually began losing her short-term memory and we began to see signs of her long-term memory degrading too. It began to get harder and harder to take her out into public without being afraid of what would happen next. Her emotions would fluctuate with the changing of each minute it seemed. Physically she became weaker and weaker and would often scare us with falling w ...
    Related: cure, elderly people, food and drug administration, long-term memory, lowering
  • Alzheimers - 435 words
    ALZHEIMER'S Brian Foster Health March 2, 1999 Alzheimer's disease was first described by Alois Alzheimer. Alois Alzheimer was a German psychiatrist and neuropathologist and he first described it in 1906. The disease was first thought to be a rare condition affecting only young people, and was referred to as presenite dementia. About 10 percent of the United States population over the age of 65 is affected by Alzheimer's disease, and up to 45 percent of those over the age of 85 may have the disease. Up to 2 million people suffer from it, or one percent of the population. During the early stages of the disease, a person forgets daily events, but they can still recall things that happened many ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, book encyclopedia, united states population, drug administration, familiar
  • Animal Cruelty - 1,051 words
    Animal Cruelty Jeff Albrecht Joseph Aimone Writing and Rhetoric 13 December 2000 Animal Cruelty One of the most touchy aspects of our relationship with animals is the use of animals in laboratory sciences. Some manufactures of cosmetics and household products still conduct painful and useless tests on live animals, even though no law requires them not to. Some people, called anti-vivisectionists, are at one extreme in their concern. They want an abolition of all experiments on live animals. At the other extreme there are those who say that it is quite all right for us to do whatever we like to animals. They say that God gave us such a right, since it is written in the bible (Genesis 1:26) th ...
    Related: animal cruelty, animal experimentation, animal testing, cruelty, ultimate good
  • Animal Experimentation - 660 words
    Animal Experimentation Annually, millions of animals suffer and die in painful tests in order to determine the safety of cosmetics. Substances like eye shadow and soap are tested on rabbits, guinea pigs, rats, dogs, and many other animals, despite the fact that the test results do not help prevent or treat human illness or injury. Cosmetics are not required to be experimented on animals, and since non-animal alternatives exist, it's difficult to understand why some companies still choose to conduct these brutal and unnecessary tests. Cosmetic companies murder millions of animals every year just to put a few more dollars into their pockets. The companies who perform these tests claim that the ...
    Related: animal experimentation, animal testing, animal welfare, experimentation, food and drug administration
  • Animal Experiments - 684 words
    Animal Experiments Animal experimentation by scientists can be cruel and unjust, but at the same time it can provide long term benefits for humanity. Animals used in research and experiments have been going on for 2,000 years and keep is going strong. It is a widely debated about topic all over the world. Some say it is inhuman while others say it's for the good of human kind. There are many different reasons why people perform experiments and why others total disagree with it. Each year 20 million animals are produce and breed for the only purpose but to be tested on. Fifty-three thousands of animals are used each year in medical and veterinary schools. The rest is used in basic research. T ...
    Related: animal experimentation, animal research, animal science, food and drug administration, basic research
  • Animal Testing - 1,425 words
    Animal Testing Considering the furor raised about using animals for testing, are there alternatives to using such testing? What are the main tests that use animals and alternatives that would achieve similar results? There is a lot of controversy about using animals to test cosmetics. Animal rights organizations feel that it is unnecessary and uncalled for. The Food and Drug Administration have no law that cosmetics have to be tested on animals. The main reason cosmetic companies continue to use animals to test their products instead of the alternatives is because they are afraid of getting laws suites. The alternatives to animal testing have not yet been validated, therefore if they were ta ...
    Related: animal liberation, animal rights, animal testing, testing, research methods
  • Animal Testing - 1,686 words
    Animal Testing Please Read This Warning Before You Use This Essay for Anything (It Might Save Your Life) Animal Testing Using animals for testing is wrong and should be banned. They have rights just as we do. Twenty-four hours a day humans are using defenseless animals for cruel and most often useless tests. The animals have no way of fighting back. This is why there should be new laws to protect them. These legislations also need to be enforced more regularly. Too many criminals get away with murder. Although most labs are run by private companies, often experiments are conducted by public organizations. The US government, Army and Air force in particular, has designed and carried out many ...
    Related: animal experimentation, animal liberation, animal rights, animal testing, testing
  • Antibiotics And Children - 1,429 words
    Antibiotics And Children A very important issue concerning the children of today is the excess prescribing of antibiotics and the dangers that are being created. Everyday, more and more children are being prescribed any easy solution to a very tough problem. There is a constant push from pharmaceutical companies, parents, and massive marketing companies to try the next antibiotic remedy, but as we look towards the future and the diseases that can be created by this quick fix, we should turn to our attention to alternatives remedies. What is so terrible about this situation is that the worst-case scenario of the effects of the mass doses of antibiotics they ingest is an untreatable bacterium ...
    Related: drug administration, immune system, bubonic plague, letting, pneumonia
  • Argument Against The Legalization Of Marijuna - 1,687 words
    Argument Against The Legalization Of Marijuna Argument against the legalization of marijuna The legalization of marijuana is one of the most highly debated about subjects facing Canadians and Americans today. Advocates of legalization use two major arguments in their effort to have marijuana legalized. First, which is by far the biggest argument is that marijuana has a significant medical use. The second argument is that marijuana does not cause harm to those that smoke it. Both of these arguments can be easily discounted by the numerous studies that have been done on the effects of marijuana both medicinal and recreational. In the following paragraphs we will explore the hard facts of marij ...
    Related: drug legalization, legalization, legalize marijuana, criminal behavior, intoxicated
  • Birth Control - 1,146 words
    Birth Control The history of the Pill is a history interwoven with capitalism, exploitation, racism and classism. In that this is a historical look at oral contraception, this section will proceed in chronological order through the development, testing and present day situation of "the Pill." This historical look will also discuss the effects of capitalism, exploitation, racism and classism, with a careful look at how the effects of oral contraception were felt in vastly different ways by white women and black women. Development of the Pill was partly facilitated by Katherine McCormic, multi-million dollar widow and friend of Margaret Sanger, who contributed over three million dollars for sc ...
    Related: birth control, control movement, control programs, population control, union address
  • Birth Control - 1,065 words
    ... one sin for which the penalty is national death, race suicide" (Davis 19). It is no wonder that reproduction in America is grossly stratified, especially when our great leaders reflect and reinforce the racist, eugenic, classist notions of acceptable reproduction. Interestingly enough, Roosevelts race suicide arguments drew more people to support the birth control movement, as well as exposed the racial divisions within the movement (Davis 19). The birth control movement reflected and reinforced some of the racial divisions surrounding reproductive rights. Angela Davis explains that birth control. . . is a fundamental prerequisite for the emancipation of women. Since the right of birth c ...
    Related: birth control, control movement, public health, works cited, reimbursement
  • Blowing Smoke - 1,337 words
    Blowing Smoke Blowing Smoke In the United States today, more than forty six million Americans are addicted to cigarettes. More people have died due to cigarette smoking than from narcotic drugs, World Wars I and II, and the Vietnam War combined (Bailey 1). The annual death toll for cigarette smoking is more than four-hundred thousand Americans a year, and is the number-one preventable cause of death in the United States. If Americans are aware of the lethal effects of smoking, why is it still so popular? Guy Smith, a Phillip Morris Tobacco Company executive, claims that their research shows that advertising is the top reason people start smoking (Bailey 34). Most people will argue that this ...
    Related: blowing, smoke, televised sports, target audience, friendly
  • Breast Implants - 1,065 words
    Breast Implants I. Should breast implants be concidered dangerous or are they safe for women to use? Small-breasted women in America say that they feel inferior or unfeminine in a culture where breast size is a major issue. Popular fashion models today are usually thin,but large-breasted,especially those who model lingerie,evening wear and swimsuits. With American culture seeming to equate cleavage with sexiness,it is no wonder that some smaller-breasted women doubt their attractiveness and recive implants that make their breasts larger.The explosive popularity of breast implants over the past three decades has waned recently,however,as a result of a growing controversy over their safety. Ar ...
    Related: breast, breast augmentation, breast cancer, breast implants, american medical
  • Chemical Warfare - 1,064 words
    ... which can lead to pneumonia, is very fast spreading, and can lead to respiratory distress, contracts it. It can be lethal. Death can occur in less than 48 hours from the time of infection. Inhalation anthrax however is very rare and there is a vaccination available. According to Health Answers, Symptoms include:  Fever  General Discomfort, uneasiness, or ill feeling (malaise)  Headaches  Shortness of breath  Cough  Congestion of the nose and throat  Pneumonia  Joint Stiffness  Joint pain Signs and tests:  Blood culture is positive for anthrax  Chest x-ray  Serologic test for anthrax  ...
    Related: chemical warfare, warfare, distress syndrome, drug administration, infected
  • Chemistry: Reaction With Sugar - 204 words
    Chemistry: Reaction With Sugar The variable that was used in our experiment was common sugar. The process of spearation is refining. The natural sugar stored in the cane stalk or beetroot is separated from the rest of the plant material. Sugar cane is refined by the following process: a) pressing the cane to extract the juice; b) boiling the juice until it begins to thicken and sugar begins to crystallize; c) spinning the crystals in a centrifuge to remove the syrup, producing raw sugar; d) shipping the raw sugar to a refinery where it is washed and filtered to remove remaining non-sugar ingredients and color; and e) crystallizing, drying and packaging the refined sugar. The U.S. Department ...
    Related: sugar, food supply, food and drug administration, department of agriculture, experiment
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