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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: flaubert

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  • Krogstad And Lheureux Are Two Literary Villains Created By Henrik Ibsen And Gustave Flaubert Respectively Between Them, They - 1,228 words
    Krogstad and Lheureux are two literary villains created by Henrik Ibsen and Gustave Flaubert respectively. Between them, they share many similarities. They both are exploiting the main character of the novels they are in. They both want something, which was at least at one point money. They both seem cold and heartless, remorseless, though nice at one point in time. When are also alike in that when they want something, they will resort to vicious means of acquiring it. They know the secrets in which both novel's plots are based. The list of similarities is significant as any one can see, but can they really be named "similar"? Perhaps they have some in common, but are the characters truly al ...
    Related: flaubert, gustave, gustave flaubert, henrik, henrik ibsen, ibsen, krogstad
  • Madame Bovary By Flaubert - 547 words
    Madame Bovary By Flaubert Gustave Flauberts Madame Bovary tells the story of a womans quest to make her life into a novel. Emma Bovary attempts again and again to escape the ordinariness of her life by reading novels, daydreaming, moving from town to town, having affairs, and buying luxurious items. One of the most penetrating debates in this novel is whether Flaubert takes on a romantic and realistic view. Is he a realist, naturalist, traditionalist, a romantic, or neither of these in this novel? According to B. F. Bart, Flaubert "was deeply irritated by those who set up little schools of the Beautiful -- romantic, realistic, or classical for that matter: there was for him only one Beautifu ...
    Related: bovary, emma bovary, flaubert, madame, madame bovary
  • Anna Karenina - 1,545 words
    ... else's thoughts, whether occasioned by chalk marks on a leather table cover or by the subtlest nuance in someone's eyes, in contrast to the falsehoods of social language that obscure and separate people, create a few brief and sometime ecstatic moments of penetration between usually separate conciousnesses, a transcending of interpersonal space. And yet words are still the tools by which, literally, men live or die. Levin's search for structure, as mentioned above, may be considered a struggle to find a language of truth. Nowhere is this more evident than in Levin's observation of the sky that occurs first at the end of the mowing scene and then much later in Part VIII, an example both ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, karenina, tragic hero, cause and effect
  • Compare The Awakening To Madame Bovary - 1,203 words
    Compare The Awakening to Madame Bovary Kate Chopin's The Awakening and Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary are both tales of women indignant with their domestic situations; the distinct differences between the two books can be found in the authors' unique tones. Both authors weave similar themes into their writings such as, the escape from the monotony of domestic life, dissatisfaction with marital expectations and suicide. References to "fate" abound throughout both works. In The Awakening, Chopin uses fate to represent the expectations of Edna Pontellier's aristocratic society. Flaubert uses "fate" to portray his characters' compulsive methods of dealing with their guilt and rejecting of pers ...
    Related: awakening, bovary, compare, emma bovary, madame, madame bovary, the awakening
  • Henry James - 238 words
    Henry James Son of the religious philosopher Henry James, Sr., and brother of the psychologist and philosopher William, Henry James was born in New York City, April 15, 1843. His early life was spent in America; on and off he was taken to Europe, especially during the impressionable years from twelve to seventeen. After that he lived in Newport, went briefly to Harvard, and, in 1864, began to contribute both criticism and tales to the magazine. In 1869, and then in 1872-74, he paid visits to Europe and began Roderick Hudsen. Late in 1875 he settled in Paris, where he met Turgenev, Flaubert, and zola, and wrote The American (1877). In December 1876 he moved to London, where two years later he ...
    Related: henry james, william henry, early life, george v, harvard
  • John Dos Passos - 1,994 words
    John Dos Passos Almost every one writer can say that they are influenced by their childhood and past. Memories flood back to them as they encounter a similar experience or similar situation in their earlier years. No doubt a significant factor in their writing, the past from a specific writer's life usually adds more depth and complexity to their works. Because these previous experiences are from the author's actual life, the scenes and subjects related to the theme are more accurate and realistic, and may even be more appealing to read. These past voices may appear either consciously through the author's works, or sometimes unconsciously, guided maybe by some early childhood memory. Well, w ...
    Related: father john, john dos passos, u.s. history, good luck, duval
  • Kate Chopins Controversial Views - 1,779 words
    Kate Chopin's Controversial Views "Too strong a drink for moral babies, and should be labeled `poison'." was the how the Republic described Kate Chopin's most famous novel The Awakening (Seyersted 174). This was the not only the view of one magazine, but it summarized the feelings of society as a whole. Chopin woke up people to the feelings and minds of women. Even though her ideas were controversial at first, slowly over the decades people began to accept them. Kate O'Flaherty Chopin was raised in St. Louis in the 1850's and 1860's. Chopin had a close relationship with her French grandmother which lead to her appreciation of French writers. When she was only five Chopin's father, Thomas O'F ...
    Related: controversial, kate, kate chopin, oscar chopin, women writers
  • Madama Bovary Anna Karenina - 1,491 words
    Madama Bovary & Anna Karenina Reading provides an escape for people from the ordinariness of everyday life. Madame Bovary and Anna Karenina, dissatisfied with their lives pursued their dreams of ecstasy and love through reading. At the beginning of both novels Anna Karenina and Emma Bovary made active decisions about their future although these decisions were not always rational. As their lives started to disintegrate Emma and Anna sought to live out their dreams and fantasies through reading. Reading served as morphine allowing them to escape the pain of everyday life, but reading like morphine closed them off from the rest of the world preventing them from making rational decisions. It was ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, bovary, emma bovary, karenina, madame bovary
  • Madame Bovary - 916 words
    Madame Bovary Gustave Flaubert presents one extreme side of human life many would very much rather think does not exist. He presents a tale of sensual symbolism within the life of Charles Bovary. Madame Bovary is the story of Emma Bovary, but within the scope of symbolic meaning, the make-up of Charles is addressed. It is representative of deep sadness and a despondent outlook on life whose many symbols are, at times, as deeply embedded in the story line as a thorn in a callous heel. The elements making up the very person of Charles Bovary remain excruciatingly evident, haunting his every move. Symbolic of his yearning for inner fulfillment, Charles Bovary presents to be a man in search of a ...
    Related: bovary, charles bovary, emma bovary, madame, madame bovary
  • Madame Bovary - 617 words
    Madame Bovary Emma Bovary, scorned, pitiful, and unsatisfied searches for happiness though wealth and sundry lovers, as the main character in Gustave Flaubert's novel Madame Bovary. Emma is not the first character to be presented, but Charles Bovary, Emma's husband opens the piece. The beginning has a major symbol which foreshadows Charles's attitude throughout the story. As a child, he walks into a new classroom with a horrifyingly grotesque hat upon his head and the other pupil's tease him about it. They keep knocking the hat off his head, and when Charles is told to remove his hat, he ignores the tradition of throwing it and making the dust go haywire. This incident gives the audience an ...
    Related: bovary, charles bovary, emma bovary, madame, madame bovary
  • The Cybernetic Plot Of Ulysses - 1,469 words
    ... 's heart good. Signals full of meaning, ones like Milly's that land where they're sent, and are properly understood, can do a world of good. "Metempsychosis" is the word in this episode that prevents Molly from understanding a sentence in the trashy novel she's reading. The transmission of spirit across time and space is itself an idea that Poldy must translate into plain words in order for its meaning to reach Molly. But he does so, and she does understand. Meanings need new clothes to cross some borders, but quick wits know how to smuggle those meanings across. The fate of the magazine story ("Matcham's Masterstroke") that Bloom reads in the outhouse shows that some signals belong in t ...
    Related: ulysses, post office, rhetorical devices, madame bovary, narcotic
  • The Great Gatsbysuper Notes Automatic A - 5,715 words
    ... and overwhelm them. Tom clearly believes it. Tom is having an affair with Myrtle Wilson, the wife of George Wilson, who runs a garage in the valley of ashes. Myrtle seems to have a dark sexual vitality that attracts Tom, and he keeps an apartment for her in New York, where he takes Nick in Chapter II. Here he again shows how little he thinks of anyone beside himself when he casually breaks Myrtle's nose with the back of his hand, because she is shouting Daisy! Daisy! in a vulgar fashion. Between Chapters II and VII we see little of Tom, but in Chapter VII he emerges as a central figure. It is Tom who pushes the affair between Gatsby and Daisy out into the open by asking Gatsby point bla ...
    Related: automatic, great gatsby, notes, the great gatsby, long island
  • Theater Free Term Papers, Book Reports, Essays, And Research - 1,253 words
    - Theater Free Term Papers, Book Reports, Essays, And Research Romeo And Juliet : Shakespeare And The Use Of Farce By Jackie Harry Sensuality was a favorite theme of William Shakespeare. Unfortunately, Romeo And Juliet is absolutely witless in terms of Shakespeare's usual conservative politics. In this paper, I will show that Romeo And Juliet is the most brilliant example of reactionary writing ever created. This claim is buttressed by three points: (1) the Surrealist theme of loss of innocence in Romeo And Juliet, (2) Shakespeare's adversarial relationship to the Symbolist school while writing the book, and (3) the author's brave employment of sensuality depite the influence of the Modernis ...
    Related: book reports, theater, t. s. eliot, gustave flaubert, master
  • Transcendentalism - 745 words
    Transcendentalism During the late 1800s and early 1900s, a new era was developing in American society. The United States was an idealistic nation with separate beliefs and lifestyles. One of the most intriguing lifestyles introduced during this time was transcendentalism. Many authors, such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathanial Hawthorne, Walt Whitman and Henry David Thoreau, developed this idea and tried to make people understand the meaning behind this new way of lfe. Through his extensive writings of books, essays and poetry, Thoreau gave the American public a deep insight to the new world of transcendentalism. While he was growing up, Thoreau rarely left his birth town of Concord. He felt th ...
    Related: transcendentalism, civil disobedience, ralph waldo emerson, american renaissance, fuller
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