Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: finch

  • 65 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • Finch In A Pinch - 752 words
    Finch In A Pinch Problem Statement As scientists, we have come to this island to observe the evolution of finches when forced into an unfamiliar habitat with a changing food supply. Hypothesis We believe our finch, Pherous robustus, will have a good chance at survival because its beak will allow for the finch to grasp many different seed shapes and sizes. Conclusion During our first 5 years, corn grew well on the island. Our finch population steadily increased during this time period. Our finch was very well adapted to eating the corn because it was very easy for our finch to pick up. During the next five years there was a drought and only block plants grew. Our finch population steadily dec ...
    Related: finch, food sources, more successful, natural disaster, selection
  • To Kill A Mockingbird Atticus Finch - 749 words
    To Kill a Mockingbird - Atticus Finch Atticus Finch was a man who fought for what he believed in. He was always the one who stood up for what was right, not what the more popular thing to do was. Atticus has a lot of courage to do what he did for Tom Robinson. Atticus looked past the racism that was in the courtroom where Tom was being accused of raping a woman and he stood up for him. Atticus believed in equality amongst people and he thought that the court was not being equal. Atticus taught his daughter Scout and his son Jem to be a good person and to treat everyone equally. He believed that success was not just winning, but instead just trying to fight for a good cause. Even if you faile ...
    Related: atticus, atticus finch, finch, mockingbird, to kill a mockingbird
  • To Kill A Mockingbird The Maturing Of Jem Finch - 1,006 words
    To Kill A Mockingbird - The Maturing of Jem Finch Society is not as innocent to a child as it may appear to be. In fact, when one really understands the society in which he lives he is no longer a child. This is much the same case as found in To Kill A Mockingbird, by Leigh Harper. Although Jem, being a child at the beginning of the novel, is immature and unaware of the society in which he lives, he matures mentally to the point where he sees the evil in society and gains a knowledge of death. Like most children, at the beginning of To Kill A Mockingbird Jem and Scout are both young, play together, and have childhood monsters or fears like other children. Primarily, in To Kill A Mockingbird, ...
    Related: finch, mockingbird, to kill a mockingbird, justice system, haunted house
  • A Rose For Emily - 383 words
    A Rose For Emily Reading To Kill A Mockingbird and A Rose For Emily I noticed several differences and likenesses. I would like to convey my thoughts to you. Females in "A Rose For Emily" are depicted as reclusive, crazy, and nosy. Females in "To Kill A Mockingbird" are depicted as smart, outgoing, and full of pride. For example, Emily and Aunt Alexandra are both full of pride. Emily is so full of pride that when she finds out that Homer Barron is not going to marry her and that he is gay that she kills him. She lets the town think that they are married. When in fact she kills him. Emily is afraid of what the town will say about her. Aunt Alexandra is full of a different kind of pride. She is ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, rose for emily, to kill a mockingbird, homer barron
  • African Widow Bird - 1,437 words
    African Widow Bird Finding good day care can certainly pose a problem these days, unless, of course, you're an African widow bird. When it comes time for a female widow bird to lay her eggs, she simply locates the nest of a nearby Estrildid finch and surreptitiously drops the eggs inside. That's the last the widow bird ever sees of her offspring. But not to worry, because the Estrildid finch will take devoted care of the abandoned birds as if they were her own. And who's to tell the difference? Though adult widow birds and Estrildid finches don't look at all alike, their eggs do. Not only that, baby widow birds are dead ringers for Estrildid finch chicks, both having the same colouration and ...
    Related: african, bird, widow, sri lanka, sea anemones
  • Aging Theories - 1,709 words
    Aging Theories This report outlines the main theories of how the process of aging works. Since researchers have not discovered a universally-accepted theory of aging, the theories discussed are potential explanations of how we age. The likelihood of each hypothesis is considered roughly equal. The different theories discussed focus on the workings of different parts of the body, from the molecular level of DNA mutations and replication, to the organism level of becoming "worn out." Aging is a very complex and gradual process, and its ongoing operation is present to some degree in all individuals. It is a journey to the maturity, as well as to the degeneration of the body. Because aging affec ...
    Related: aging, aging process, cell division, free radicals, gradual
  • Aging Theories - 1,767 words
    ... ter a certain number of divisions, the clock genes are triggered and may produce proteins responsible for cell destruction (Keeton, 1992, 50). Cellular Aging In 1961, a discovery made by Leonard Hayflick showed that normal, diploid cells from such continually Areplaced@ parts of the body as skin, lungs, and bone marrow, divide a limited number of times. Although the cells stop dividing at the point just before DNA synthesis, they do not die. The longer-lived the species, the more divisions the cells undergo. As the age of an individual increases, the number of potential divisions decreases (Ricklefs and Finch, 1995, 29). This discovery was found using fibroblasts, or cells found in the c ...
    Related: aging, aging process, bone fracture, concise encyclopedia, testosterone
  • Anne Finches Opposition To The Rape Of The Lock - 855 words
    Anne Finches Opposition To The Rape Of The Lock Anne Finch's Opposition to The Rape of the Lock The Restoration Period (1660-1700) was a period of social, political and philosophical turmoil, which laid the foundation for future centuries. This period was marked by an advance in colonization and trade and by the birth of the Whig and Tory parties. In poetry, works of Alexander Pope and Anne Finch and a number of other poets distinguishes the Restoration. But, there are several objections from these poets; one particular opposition occurs between Pope's The Rape of the Lock and Anne Finch. Pope was born into a Catholic family during a period of intense anti-Catholic sentiment in England. His ...
    Related: anne, lock, rape, eighteenth century, men and women
  • Beer - 725 words
    Beer Pong This will explain everything an individual needs to know about the game of beer pong. Beer pong requires no strength or skill, but demands the prowess of a drunken college student mind. Many believe in the game of beer pong there exists rigorous competition. The real object of the game does not require winning. It requires having fun and getting drunk. Beer pong started one Friday night long ago in some fraternity house. Pure entertainment and intoxication inspired the creation of beer pong. The simple game transmitted through word of mouth and observation. Today beer pong exists as a house hold name at parties. Anyone can view beer pong at any fraternity house on a Friday or Satur ...
    Related: beer, saturday night, food lion, sporting goods, luck
  • Chronicle Life And Times Of Sula And Nel - 1,468 words
    Chronicle - Life And Times Of Sula And Nel It all began in and around the year 1919. Sula Peace, the daughter of Rekus who died when she was 3years old and Hannah, was a young and lonely girl of wild dreams. Sula was born in the same year as Nel, 1910. Sula was a heavy brown color and had large eyes with a birthmark that resembled a stemmed rose to some and many varied things to others. Nel Wright, the daughter of Helene and Wiley, was and unimaginative girl living in a very strict and manipulated life. Nel was lighter in color than Sula and could have passed for white if she had been a few shades lighter she. A trip to visit her dying great-grandmother in the south had a profound effect on ...
    Related: chronicle, last time, real life, sula, sula peace
  • College Acceptance - 901 words
    College Acceptance I am more than what meets the eye. There is only a certain part of me that people observe and judge me by in my everyday life. Some people know me as the boy who rushes down to the Harmon Cove bus stop every morning half awake and half asleep juggling several items in my hands. In one hand I have my books that I 'attempted' to read for homework the previous night and my other hand is holding on to my Sony metallic cd player for my bus ride to school. My peers and acquaintances wait for my arrival on the yellow school bus expecting me to begin their day off by cracking few jokes and sharing stories of my wild weekends. Only I wish they would know that not all my 'wild' week ...
    Related: acceptance, college admissions, cd player, family member, busy
  • Darwinism - 1,101 words
    Darwinism Throughout time, great minds have produced ideas that have changed the world we live in. Similarly, in the Victorian times, Charles Darwin fathomed ideas that altered the way we look at ourselves and fellow creatures. By chance, Darwin met and learned of certain individuals who opened doors that laid the foundation for his theories which shook the world. Darwin's initial direction in life was not the same as his final. He grew up in a wealthy sophisticated English family and at the age of sixteen, Darwin went to the University of Edinburgh to study medicine.(Darwin) Two years later, he decided to leave medical school and attended the University of Cambridge to become a clergyman of ...
    Related: darwinism, over time, natural process, medical school, david
  • Education And Evolution - 1,418 words
    Education And Evolution Throughout recent history creationists and evolutionists have argued whether evolution should be a part of America's public education. Whether evolution is science fact, or science fiction. Evolution being a science based on statistics has some faults, although many concepts in science or math do. The process of learning about evolution is a necessary part of a well-rounded student's education due to the fact that it is a statistically proven science and removing it in turn revokes certain student's rights. In a student's academic career that a student is most likely at one time or another going to have to take a science class. Science, being the main topic of discuss ...
    Related: biological evolution, evolution, evolution and creationism, public education, teaching evolution, theory of evolution
  • Education: Evolution Or Ignorance - 1,419 words
    Education: Evolution Or Ignorance Throughout recent history creationists and evolutionists have argued whether evolution should be a part of America's public education. Whether evolution is science fact, or science fiction. Evolution being a science based on statistics has some faults, although many concepts in science or math do. The process of learning about evolution is a necessary part of a well-rounded student's education due to the fact that it is a statistically proven science and removing it in turn revokes certain student's rights. In a student's academic career that a student is most likely at one time or another going to have to take a science class. Science, being the main topic ...
    Related: biological evolution, evolution, evolution and creationism, ignorance, teaching evolution, theory of evolution
  • Emily Dickinson And Harper Lee - 406 words
    Emily Dickinson And Harper Lee In a poem by Emily Dickinson she implies that there is nothing like reading a book to take your imagination to great places. She states, "There is no frigate like a book to take us lands away." Such an idea that excites the imagination to take us places is expressed in Harper Lees To Kill a Mockingbird. In To Kill a Mockingbird there is a great use of symbolism to ignite the human imagination. The title of the book is only mentioned in the story when the father of the protagonist, Atticus Finch, tells his children that if they have to kill birds, they can kill any bird, but "tis a sin to kill a mockingbird." Although this may seem peculiar, the use of symbolism ...
    Related: dickinson, emily, emily dickinson, harper, harper lee
  • Eve Names The Animals - 625 words
    Eve Names The Animals The poem Eve Names the Animals, by Susan Donnelly is based upon the relationship of Adam and Eve. I think that there are a few possible themes to this poem. One possibility is that this poem is about the arbitrary naming of animals in the beginning of time. Another possibility is that this poem addresses Adam and Eves differing views that surround change. Eve questions the names of animals. She sees that animals are named somewhat arbitrarily and sees a need for change in the names of creatures. The poem begins by describing a dove, but assigns the title lion to the creature. Next, a lion is described and assigned the title of Dove. Eve goes on to say that she believes ...
    Related: adam and eve, variation, metaphor, suppose
  • Evil: Relation Of Experience And Maturation - 907 words
    Evil: Relation of Experience and Maturation "Our greatest evils flow from ourselves" (Tripp 192). This statement, by Rousseau, epitomizes many points of evil that are discussed in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird. In our world today, we are stared in the face everyday with many facets of evil. These nefarious things come in several forms, including, but not limited to discrimination of sex, race, ethnicity, physical appearance, and popularity, alcoholism, drug abuse, irresponsibility, and even murder. The occurrences of evil and wrong-doing in To Kill A Mockingbird further along Scout's maturation into a young woman. Three of the most important instances of evil are those of racism, alcoho ...
    Related: maturation, relation, harper lee, mayella ewell, woman
  • In Harper Lees Novel, To Kill A Mocking Bird You See That Maturation Of Some Of The Characters Is Clearly Evident, Particular - 1,102 words
    In Harper Lees novel, To Kill A Mocking Bird you see that maturation of some of the characters is clearly evident, particularly Scouts. You see this by the way she acts in front of Miss Maudie, Calpurnia and Mrs. Alexandra Finch. Beside her father, Scout respects and likes most Miss Maudie. They have a great relationship and they both love each other very deeply. When Scout first introduce us to Miss Maudie (in chapter 5), she tells us all the nicest things about her. She talks about how much she and Jem trusted Miss Maudie and what a good friend she was. They trusted her because she never told on them, never played cat-and-mouse with them, and because she was not at all interested in their ...
    Related: bird, harper, maturation, mocking, racial tensions
  • In The Novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, By Harper Lee, The Author Comments On - 327 words
    In the novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, the author comments on life. Specifically, Harper Lee comments on racism and true courage. Racism is the first subject that the author comments on. It is obvious from her writing that she feels racism is that it is wrong. This is displayed in several ways. The best example of racism is the trial of Tom Robinson. Tom received a guilty verdict even though he was innocent. The white jury convicted him for the sole reason that he is black. Another example of racism is that fact the black children were not educated. Only the white children of Maycomb were granted the right to go to school. Another example of racism is the way people acted at Cal ...
    Related: harper, harper lee, to kill a mockingbird, atticus finch, reasonable doubt
  • In To Kill A Mocking Bird, Harper Lee Gives Us A Very Detailed Description Of - 1,051 words
    In To Kill a Mocking Bird, Harper Lee gives us a very detailed description of Robert Ewell, his family, and how he lives. A good example is the passage in which Robert Ewell testifies in the Tom Robinson Trial. This is a description of the Ewell's home as well as an insight into the Ewells themselves. We learn what kind of a father Robert is and the kind of life into which he has forced his eldest daughter, Mayella. We also see how the county of Maycomb cruelly discriminates against the black community even though they are more respectable than people like the Ewells. Lee uses such detail in the account of the Ewell cabin because the best way to understand the Ewells is to understand how the ...
    Related: detailed description, harper, harper lee, mocking, black people
  • 65 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>