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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: films

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  • Effects Of Popaganda Films On Wwii - 1,289 words
    Effects Of Popaganda Films On Wwii The effects of film on WWII propaganda Without the advent of the medium of film to wage a war of propaganda both the Axis and the Allies of World War II would have found it difficult to gather as much support for their causes as they did. Guns, tanks, and bombs were the principal weapons of World War II, but there were other, more subtle, forms of warfare as well. Words, posters, and films waged a constant battle for the hearts and minds of the masses of the world just as surely as military weapons engaged the enemy. Persuading the public became a wartime industry, almost as important as the manufacturing of bullets and planes. Both sides launched an aggres ...
    Related: feature film, films, wwii, decision making, international finance
  • Effects Of Popaganda Films On Wwii - 1,258 words
    ... ore each new aggressive move by Germany, as for example, against Czechoslovakia in 1938, the German press, radio and newsreels publicized alleged evidence of persecution of German minorities in the victim country. Incidents were manufactured and exploited to justify German intervention. The German war machine was depicted as invincible. The technique proved effective in dividing populations, weakening the power of the victim to resist, and causing its allies to hesitate. Plus bring back films from the fronts lines of various German victories help win more and more support back home, along with helping to recruit young men who too wanted to be like the heroes portrayed by these films. By ...
    Related: film noir, films, wwii, american people, nazi propaganda
  • Excellence, Popularity, Typicality Discuss The Relative Merits Of Each Of These As A Basis For The Inclusion Of Films In A Fi - 1,414 words
    'Excellence', 'Popularity', 'Typicality' - Discuss The Relative Merits Of Each Of These As A Basis For The Inclusion Of Films In A Film History 'Excellence', 'popularity', 'typicality' - discuss the relative merits of each of these as a basis for the inclusion of films in a film history Any attempt to study film history requires the consideration of films, which occur within the categories of excellence, popularity and typicality. They are three very different approaches to film history; 'excellence' covering films recognised as having artistic merit, 'popularity' covering films which have been financially or sociologically successful and 'typicality', films which are classed as mainstream d ...
    Related: cannes film festival, film history, films, horror films, inclusion, relative
  • Excellence, Popularity, Typicality Discuss The Relative Merits Of Each Of These As A Basis For The Inclusion Of Films In A Fi - 1,439 words
    ... be successful with a 15+ certificate, it relies even more on hype and controversy over its content; the most successful have controversial violence and gore like 'The Exorcist'(Friedkin, 1973) or sexual content for example 'Basic Instinct'(Verhoeven, 1992). Based only on the most profitable films, popularity is a very limited area of film to study as part of film history. In part this is due to the problems with the calculation of box office receipts, which is hugely biased towards modern films. It does not take into account inflation or the rise in ticket prices, so older films would have to have been seen by many times the number of people of modern films in order to have the same box ...
    Related: film history, film industry, films, inclusion, relative
  • Films As Primary Sources For History - 1,032 words
    Films As Primary Sources For History Films as primary sources for history If a picture is worth a thousand words than how much is a moving picture, or movie, worth? In the study of history, the usage of movies as primary sources is controversial. Motion pictures are more commonly well-known as sources and created for entertainment purposes. Film is a creation of a reality. This has some valuable resources for the study of history in many respects. They may or may not be representational, and some may include writing or printing. Some can be categorized as fine art, others as documentary record. Originality may or may not be important, and the content may or may not be the primary focus. Hist ...
    Related: films, history, primary sources, public interest, historical accuracy
  • Most Films, Even The Excellent Ones, Fit Squarely Into An Existing Tradition Of Cinema You Have Seen The Same Sort Of Thing B - 1,200 words
    Most films, even the excellent ones, fit squarely into an existing tradition of cinema. You have seen the same sort of thing before, even though the approach and many aspects of the film are novel. Once in a great while, more often for adventurous movie-goers than for those who see only Hollywood films, you come across something that is really new and different. Even less often, it is new, different, and good. Such a film is like a revelation. The first Kubrick movie one sees, or the first Tarkovsky, or the first Fellini, can be this sort of experience, a sudden broadening of one's private definition of what film is. The cinematic experience of Horse Thief was created by director, Tian Zhuan ...
    Related: cinema, face value, people's republic of china, film sound, deceased
  • Stereotypes Of Native Americans In Modern Films - 1,818 words
    Stereotypes Of Native Americans In Modern Films The savage persona, the war paint, the feathers and the beating drums are just some of the stereotypical images and attributes associated with Native American culture. The casting of Native Americans into villainous roles of early film and television has perpetuated a false perception of Native Americans that is still tied to their culture today. For centuries, Native Americans have been defined by stereotypical perceptions of Indian culture. These preconceived notions of Native culture are amplified if not derived from, the racially biased portrayal of Native Americans in the mass media and film throughout history. Though some of the modern de ...
    Related: american attitudes, american children, american culture, american literature, american people, american west, films
  • The Changes Of The Situation Of Women As Presented In Three Cuban Films - 997 words
    The Changes Of The Situation Of Women As Presented In Three Cuban Films The Changes of the Situation of Women as Presented in Three Cuban Films The Cuban revolution has brought about great change for women. Prior to Castro's reign, women mainly had lives that revolved around the household, and very few had professional jobs. Also, they were traditionally seen as subordinate to men in political and social situations. Gradually, women became more active outside of the household and started to participate in revolutionary pursuits, as well as take care of the family. Along with the revolutionary ideals of social equality in Cuba, came a strong women's rights movement - a struggle against the hi ...
    Related: cuban, cuban revolution, films, women's rights, social situations
  • 2001 A Space Odyssey - 1,265 words
    2001 A Space Odyssey 2001 : A Space Odyssey. I am going to be talking about Stanley Kubricks '2001: a space odyssey', focusing (obviously) on the music, but also the sound. I will also be incorporating elements from Mark Millers article "2001 - a cold descent" 2001: A Space Odyssey, introduced in 1968, is a high concept production that begins by tracing the 'Dawn Of Man', which eventually leads to a journey through the solar system by a crew of astronauts aboard a spaceship bound for Jupiter. The accompanying soundtrack plays as much of a role in the development of suspense and intrigue as the actors performances. Three decades later, the soundtrack remains one of the most recognized in cine ...
    Related: odyssey, space odyssey, space station, sound effects, ridley scott
  • A Birth Of A Nation The Bicycle Thieves - 1,300 words
    A Birth Of A Nation - The Bicycle Thieves In that paper, I will try to compare two films which are A Birth of a Nation directed by D.W.Griffith and The Bicycle Thieves directed by De Sica. After giving the story of the films, I will try to explain their technical features and their similarities. A Birth of a Nation by D. W. Griffith Griffith can be seen as the first 'modern' director, his greatest achievements being the historical epics The Birth Of A Nation. When it was released, it was one of the longest films ever made, over three hours in length. The prologue depicts the introduction of slavery to America in the seventeenth century and the beginnings of the abolitionist movement. The maj ...
    Related: bicycle, thieves, civil rights, ku klux klan, sequence
  • A Mid Summer Nights Dream Film Analysis - 1,207 words
    A Mid Summer Night's Dream Film Analysis A Mid Summer Night's Dream Film Analysis A Mid summer Night's Dream is another entry into Shakespeare's recent rebirth on film. Michael Hoffman's film dose not stay true to the text, but he must take liberties to allow for this classic story to be entertaining to today's audience. In this essay I will discuss the differences between the text vision and the film vision of this story from the historical setting, the time placement, Hoffman's personal adaptations, and finally Hoffman's character adaptations. In Michael Hoffman's film of William Shakespeare's a Midsummer Night's Dream, Hoffman has made some changes to the location and historical aspects o ...
    Related: a midsummer night's dream, dream, film, film analysis, film version, midsummer night, night dream
  • A Moment Of Innocence - 1,154 words
    A Moment Of Innocence A Moment of Innocence: Reconciling the Past When I walked into class that day I was indifferent to the movie that we would be watching that evening. Five minutes into A Moment of Innocence (1995) by Mohsan Makhmalbaf, I was hooked. By taking a pseudo-documentary style Makhmalbaf lets us see the people as they are transformed into the characters from the director's past. This style allows us to "grow up" with them and to relate to both sides of the story. By taking a true event and fictionalizing, at least part of it, Makhmalbaf has us trying to figure out what parts have been added to the narrative and which parts truly speak to history. A documentary does not strive to ...
    Related: innocence, real life, the girl, point of view, colour
  • A Practical Approach To Television Violence - 1,290 words
    A Practical Approach To Television Violence As difficult as this issue is, I believe it can be addressed. My report shows that some progress has already begun in several areas. Attention needs to be focused on how and why some programming has begun to move in the right direction and why the rest has not. What this issue needs, more than anything else, is cool heads on all sides of the problem: the network executives, the creative community, the government, researchers and advocacy groups. All sides need to worry less about how each development affects only them and instead look at the needs of everyone.(U.C.L.A. 5) In the broadcast world, the four television networks, ABC, CBS, FOX, and NBC, ...
    Related: practical, television, television programming, television violence, violence, violence on television
  • A Separate Peace: Chapter 1 - 5,662 words
    ... truth, the shadowy, elusive truth of an instant that is already beginning to fade in memory. Gene is about to make a full confession--or he thinks he is--when Dr. Stanpole and the nurse arrive. The following day Finny is sent home to recuperate. The summer session comes to an end, appropriately enough for Gene, for until now summer had represented freedom, sports, and running outdoors, with Finny as the light and life of it all. Now all that has changed. A month later, after a sojourn at home, Gene heads back to school for his senior year. On the way he makes a detour to call on Finny. NOTE: The "surprise" reunion is no surprise to Finny, who appears to have been waiting anxiously in hop ...
    Related: separate peace, ultimate punishment, last time, self awareness, burning
  • A Thematic Analysis Of Alfred Hitchcocks Psycho - 1,465 words
    A Thematic Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho Arts- Movies A Thematic Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho has been commended for forming the archetypical basis of all horror films that followed its 1960 release. The mass appeal that Psycho has maintained for over three decades can undoubtedly be attributed to its universality. In Psycho, Hitchcock allows the audience to become a subjective character within the plot to enhance the film's psychological effects for an audience that is forced to recognise its own neurosis and psychological inadequacies as it is comp  elled to identify, for varying lengths of time, with the contrasting personalities of the film's m ...
    Related: alfred, alfred hitchcock, psycho, thematic, thematic analysis
  • A Time To Kill - 801 words
    A Time To Kill Tradition is a priceless component to any culture, as it has been shaped and developed by time itself. Tradition passes from generation to generation, exercising its influence through the actions and thoughts of a people. The tradition that has materialized from the history of the American South is no different. It remains a pillar of hope, faith, and pride for those southerners who embrace it. Tradition of the South dictates a way life with roots in the very foundation of the United States. While this may act as a testament to the strength and courage of the people of the south, the fact remains that the principles laid down by this tradition defy civil rights and respect for ...
    Related: rights movement, civil rights, psychological effects, klux, detrimental
  • Abstract - 925 words
    Abstract The experiment involved constructing a microphone from the materials given to us. Our group was supposed to make as sensitive microphone as possible. This laboratory was also intended to introduce the concept of sensor materials which can be made to act as electric sense organs. Our group has lost the competition, but even so by the end of the lab we understood how the microphone works and was able to construct it and test it using the Lab VIEW program. Introduction A real microphone consists of a diaphragm that is connected to a magnet. Sound waves vibrate the diaphragm and move the magnet in and out. The magnet is inside a coil of wire. When the magnet moves inside a coil of wire ...
    Related: abstract, fall apart, magnet, introduce
  • Accidents - 1,731 words
    Accidents Aircraft Investigation Each mishap has their own characteristics and there is no substitute for good old-fashioned common sense and initiative. Each wrecked aircraft has its own story to tell if properly investigated. However Air Force guidelines are quick to point out that investigators in their eagerness seek out the causes, often ignore safe investigation practices and common safety precautions. Air Force Investigators are maybe in even more difficult position due to the hazards that are unique to the military war fighting machines, Ill discuss a few of these hazards briefly before I get into the steps of Air Force accident investigations. Munitions Extreme care must be given to ...
    Related: human body, early stages, government agencies, acquire, questioning
  • Add And Learning Strategies - 1,641 words
    Add And Learning Strategies Attention can be defined as the process of selecting certain environmental inputs needed for cognitive processing. Information that we are capable of sensing stays with us in the sensory register for a very brief period of time. From this point the information is cognitively processed. The role of attention can be found in the moving of this information from the sensory register into the working memory. Normal attention span seems to develop in three stages. First, the childs attention is said to be overly exclusive. This is a term used by psychologists to describe attention that is focused on a single object for a long period of time while tuning out all other st ...
    Related: classroom learning, learning environment, learning experience, learning strategies, family history
  • African American Community - 3,040 words
    ... stood that his name would not appear in the program credits or advertising. For twenty weeks, the Mahalia Jackson Show ran on television for a half-hour each episode. Beginning in September 1954, the show did not last very long. Mahalias show featured her singing traditional gospels and spirituals with a few miscellaneous songs but the show was missing a major component. (2) The show was in need of a sponsor and began to go out of business. The show went from thirty minutes airtime to ten minutes and eventually ended in February 1955. This was not the end of Mahalia's television appearances however. The TV station, WBBM-TV of Chicago asked Mahalia to be a guest on their program, "In Town ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american community, race relations
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