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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: fictional

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  • Faulkners: Barnburning Fictional Ending - 612 words
    Faulkner's: "Barnburning" Fictional Ending This a fictional ending to Faulkner's story "Barnburning" for a college course Changes...After Barn burning ...He did not look back. He knew that his father was going to beat him badly, so this time instead of accepting that fate, Sarty decided to get off the road his life was on and head down a new and unexplored path. Hopefully this way will have more security and stability to it than the route his father and family had been on. Family, that made Sarty think for a second. He didn't know what he was going to do, after all he had no one now. He was scared, alone, and hungry when he was suddenly startled by something behind him, it was Major de Spain ...
    Related: fictional, barn burning, major de spain, right thing, spoke
  • How To Write A Fictional Story - 231 words
    How To Write A Fictional Story One of the best ways for writers to create a story line is to base it upon real life occurrences. Mark Twain worked on a riverboat. Jack London explored Alaska. Hemmingway was an avid fisherman and loved to travel. Their experiences allowed them to create settings and characters that seem real. A good way for a writer to fictionalize their life is to combine various experiences together. Use things that happen to a friend, and add those experiences to your own. They may be things a writer has witnessed, or things a friend tells them about in detail. You can use the experiences to create a completely different story about your character. The same idea works in c ...
    Related: fictional, jack london, creative writing, real life, creative
  • Njals Saga: A Fictional Account Of Early Iceland - 1,980 words
    Njal's Saga: A Fictional Account Of Early Iceland Njal's Saga: A Fictional Account of Early Iceland "The origin and evolution of saga writing in Iceland are largely matters for speculation. A common pastime on Icelandic farms, from the 12th century down to modern times, was the reading aloud of stories to entertain the household, known as sagnaskemmtun ("saga entertainment"). It seems to have replaced the traditional art of storytelling" (Hermann Palsson, pg. 1). Njal's Saga uses Old Icelandic writing convention and historical data to give a fictional account of a generation's lifestyle and struggles. Icelandic literature has become very valuable because historians have realized the great am ...
    Related: fictional, iceland, law enforcement, country people, icelandic
  • Willowgreen School District - 1,762 words
    1. Setting - This story took place in the Willowgreen School District, near a fictional town call Bleke in 1933. Characters - The main character of this story is the author, Max Braithwaite, but addition characters in this chapter are Dave McDougall, Mrs. McDougall, and their children Mary, Heather, Myron, and Charles. Antecedent Action - The antecedent action in this chapter is when Max outlines the events leading up to the moment when he left the train at Bleke. Those events included: borrowing money for Max to finish Normal School, the incessant job searching with the eternal job refusals, also when Max started training in motor mechanics and, finally, when Max received a letter from the ...
    Related: district, normal school, school district, king george, george v
  • 1984 - 957 words
    1984 1984 The story 1984, by George Orwell, is set in the fictional country Oceania, in what is thought to be the year 1984, which consists of the Americas, the British Isles, Australia and part of Africa. The part of Oceania in which 1984 takes place is referred to as Air Strip One and is formerly England. Winston, the protagonist of the story, is faced with a conflict of extreme hatred against the ultimate antagonist, Big Brother. Big Brother is the leader of the political party of Oceania who controls not only actions, but also thoughts through the thought police and what are called "telescreens." Winston falls in love with a girl by the name of Julia, and the two of them must decide on w ...
    Related: 1984, point of view, big brother, official language, brien
  • 1984 - 1,015 words
    1984 1. Biography George Orwell is the pen name of Eric Arthur Blair, a British writer with political conscience. He was born in India but educated in England at Eton College. He served the Indian Imperial Police in Burma from 1922 to 1927. In sick health, he returned to Europe to live in poverty as a struggling writer. Orwell joined the Republican forces in the Spanish civil war, and wrote a chilling account of this experience. He went on to write many books, mostly autobiographical, and achieved successes as a brilliant writer. 2. Synopsis The novel takes place in a theoretical and fictional dystopian totalitarian society. The story begins in London on April 4, 1984 after an atomic world w ...
    Related: 1984, erich fromm, middle class, first person, arthur
  • 1984 - 661 words
    1984 1984 as an Anti-Utopian Novel A utopia is an ideal or perfect community. While some writers have created fictional places that embody their ideals societies, other writers have written satires that ridicule existing conditions of society, or anti-utopias, which show possible future societies that are anything but ideal. In 1984 , George Orwell presents a terrifying picture of future as life under the constant surveillance of Big Brother. This book 1984 is an anti-utopian novel. The main character Winston Smith lives in the large political country Oceania, which is eternally at war with one of two huge countries, Eurasia and Eastasia. At any moment all existing records show either that O ...
    Related: 1984, love affair, works cited, george orwell, affair
  • 1984 - 1,513 words
    1984 Nineteen Eighty-Four is a compelling novel, written in the period just after W.W.II. It details the life of one man, Winston Smith, and his struggles with an undoubtedly fascist government. The book is set approximately in the year 1984, in which Winston's society is ruled by a governing force known as The Party. At the head of this government is a fictional figure known as Big Brother, to whom all citizens must love and respect. In this society, privacy and freedom do not exist. People are constantly monitored by telescreens, and subjected to a constant barrage of propaganda. Any devious thought or action is dealt with by cruel and deadly punishment. Winston is a worker in one of the g ...
    Related: 1984, government agencies, specific purpose, big brother, history
  • 1984 Abstract - 616 words
    1984 Abstract Book Review of 1984 (5/97) One year before his death in 1950, George Orwell published a book entitled 1984. Since then, the novel has become a bible to people all over the world. The enthusiasm is not only due to the fact that the novel is written so eloquently, and with such foresight, but also because it makes a bold statement about humanity. 1984s main character is Winston Smith, a man who doubts the righteousness of the totalitarian government (Big Brother) that rules Oceania, one of three superstates in the world of 1984. We begin the book with Winston, and learn that Big Brother is quite fictional. The government has developed its own language, is at constant war with the ...
    Related: 1984, abstract, book review, george orwell, stark
  • 1984 By George Orwell - 681 words
    1984 By George Orwell "Nineteen Eighty Four" Fictional World In English this semester we have studied three different texts. All three texts were based on original, fictional worlds. The fictional world which stood out above the rest and really amazed me would have to be Nineteen Eighty-Four. Nineteen Eighty-Four was the most realistic out of the three. While reading the novel you really get into the fictional world and think like the main character Winston Smith. Three aspects of the text which made this world so interesting to study were The Inner Party, Big Brother, and the Thought Police. Each of these interesting aspects in Nineteen Eighty Four play a great part in the novel itself and ...
    Related: 1984, george orwell, orwell, big brother, winston smith
  • 1984 Televisions Vs Telescreens - 1,437 words
    1984 Televisions Vs Telescreens 1984 Televisions Vs Telescreens TV rots the senses in the head! It kills the imagination dead! It clogs and clutters up the mind! It makes a child so dull and blind. He can no longer understand a fantasy, A fairyland! His brain becomes as soft as cheese! His powers of thinking rust and freeze! An excerpt from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, By Roald Dahl, 1964 When George Orwells epic novel 1984 was published in 1949 it opened the publics imagination to a future world where privacy and freedom had no meaning. The year 1984 has come and gone and we generally believe ourselves to still live in "The Land of the Free;" however, as we now move into the 21st Cent ...
    Related: 1984, american television, television programming, violence on television, negative consequences
  • 2001: A Space Odyssey - 1,255 words
    2001: A Space Odyssey The concept of space travel has been an interest to many since the beginning of time. Today, scientists are moving at a comfortable pace to expand our vast knowledge of the universe. Many authors dreamed of the possibilities while scientists tried to bring them to reality. The book "2001: A Space Odyssey," written by Arthur C. Clarke in the 1960's, proposed ideas about advanced space travel that took place in a time period only two years from now; however, at the current rate of the space program, mankind is nowhere near the technology showed by the book. Clarke uses concepts of space travel that can still only be dreamed of today. Clarke, an author of the sixties, had ...
    Related: odyssey, outer space, space odyssey, space program, space shuttle, space technology, space travel
  • A Birth Of A Nation The Bicycle Thieves - 1,300 words
    A Birth Of A Nation - The Bicycle Thieves In that paper, I will try to compare two films which are A Birth of a Nation directed by D.W.Griffith and The Bicycle Thieves directed by De Sica. After giving the story of the films, I will try to explain their technical features and their similarities. A Birth of a Nation by D. W. Griffith Griffith can be seen as the first 'modern' director, his greatest achievements being the historical epics The Birth Of A Nation. When it was released, it was one of the longest films ever made, over three hours in length. The prologue depicts the introduction of slavery to America in the seventeenth century and the beginnings of the abolitionist movement. The maj ...
    Related: bicycle, thieves, civil rights, ku klux klan, sequence
  • A Brave New World And 1984 Dissimilar - 1,215 words
    A Brave New World And 1984 Dissimilar A Brave New World and 1984 Dissimilar Although many similarities exist between Aldous Huxleys A Brave New World and George Orwells 1984, the works books though they deal with similar topics, are more dissimilar than alike. A Brave New World is a novel about the struggle of Bernard Marx, who rejects the tenants of his society when he discovers that he is not truly happy. 1984 is the story of Winston who finds forbidden love within the hypocrisy of his society. In both cases, the main character is in quiet rebellion against his government which is eventually found to be in vain. Huxley wrote A Brave New World in the third person so that the reader could be ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, dissimilar, real world, world history
  • A Bugs Life: Entomological View - 453 words
    A Bug's Life: Entomological View A Bug's Life: Movie Review A Bug's Life was a full-length computer animated movie released in 1998 by Pixar. The film dealt with an inside look at the lives of arthropods, specifically ants. The film was fictional with the insects each having their own personality along with voices and human hands. The plot of A Bug's Life surrounds its star who is Flik, an inventive ant whose antics always land him into trouble. Flik manages to foil his colony's harvest by accidentally knocking it over a cliff. The harvest which was meant for a band of bullish grasshoppers is now gone and the grasshoppers aren't pleased. Hopper the leader of the grasshopper gang orders the c ...
    Related: bugs, animal science, movie review, butterfly, walking
  • A Comparison Contrast Of A Brave New World And 1984 - 1,292 words
    A Comparison Contrast of A Brave New World and 1984 Although many similarities exist between Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World and George Orwell's 1984, the works books though they deal with similar topics, are more dissimilar than alike. A Brave New World is a novel about the struggle of Bernard Marx, who rejects the tenants of his society when he discovers that he is not truly happy. 1984 is the story of Winston who finds forbidden love within the hypocrisy of his society. In both cases, the main character is in quiet rebellion against his government which is eventually found to be in vain. Huxley wrote A Brave New World in the third person so that the reader could be allotted a more compr ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, comparison, contrast, real world, world history
  • A Comparison Contrast Of A Brave New World And 1984 - 1,292 words
    A Comparison Contrast of A Brave New World and 1984 Although many similarities exist between Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World and George Orwell's 1984, the works books though they deal with similar topics, are more dissimilar than alike. A Brave New World is a novel about the struggle of Bernard Marx, who rejects the tenants of his society when he discovers that he is not truly happy. 1984 is the story of Winston who finds forbidden love within the hypocrisy of his society. In both cases, the main character is in quiet rebellion against his government which is eventually found to be in vain. Huxley wrote A Brave New World in the third person so that the reader could be allotted a more compr ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, comparison, contrast, real world, world history
  • A Comparison Contrast Of A Brave New World And 1984 - 1,292 words
    A Comparison Contrast of A Brave New World and 1984 Although many similarities exist between Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World and George Orwell's 1984, the works books though they deal with similar topics, are more dissimilar than alike. A Brave New World is a novel about the struggle of Bernard Marx, who rejects the tenants of his society when he discovers that he is not truly happy. 1984 is the story of Winston who finds forbidden love within the hypocrisy of his society. In both cases, the main character is in quiet rebellion against his government which is eventually found to be in vain. Huxley wrote A Brave New World in the third person so that the reader could be allotted a more compr ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, comparison, contrast, real world, world history
  • A Comparison Contrast Of A Brave New World And 1984 - 1,292 words
    A Comparison Contrast of A Brave New World and 1984 Although many similarities exist between Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World and George Orwell's 1984, the works books though they deal with similar topics, are more dissimilar than alike. A Brave New World is a novel about the struggle of Bernard Marx, who rejects the tenants of his society when he discovers that he is not truly happy. 1984 is the story of Winston who finds forbidden love within the hypocrisy of his society. In both cases, the main character is in quiet rebellion against his government which is eventually found to be in vain. Huxley wrote A Brave New World in the third person so that the reader could be allotted a more compr ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, comparison, contrast, real world, world history
  • A Date With Kosinski - 1,590 words
    A Date With Kosinski A Date with Kosinski Being James Bond is every man's dream. The beautiful women, fancy cars, dangerous journeys, and beautiful women. Many men would love to be in his place where all the danger and excitement take place. We don't have that capability to become an international spy, but in the novel, Blind Date by Jerzy Kosinski, we are exposed to a life similar to that of James Bond. He goes through secret negotiations. Jerzy Kosinski's use of words greatly contributes to the novel's excellence. He forces the reader to imagine everything that happens in the novel using very descriptive words and phrases. The main character of the novel is George Levanter. He poses as an ...
    Related: young adult, nazi germany, world war ii, woman, philosophy
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