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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: american poets

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  • Anne Sexton - 1,246 words
    Anne Sexton Anne Sexton The third decade of the twentieth century brought on more explicit writers than ever before, but none were as expressive as Anne Sexton. Her style of writing, her works, the image that she created, and the crazy life that she led are all prime examples of this. Known as one of the most "confessional" poets of her time, Anne Sexton was also one of the most criticized. She was known to use images of incest, adultery, and madness to reveal the depths of her deeply troubled life, which often brought on much controversy. Despite this, Anne went on to win many awards and go down as one of the best poets of all time. Anne Sexton was born Anne Gray Harvey on November 9, 1928 ...
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  • Dylan Thomas - 1,489 words
    Dylan Thomas Dylan Thomas' Final Trip to America Dylan Marlais Thomas was born in Swansea, Wales on October 27, 1914. He died November 9th, 1953 in New York City. In only 39 years, Dylan Thomas left an indelible mark on history. Thomas published numerous books of his poetry, plays, short stories, and various other works. He first toured America in early 1950, reading at a variety of public forums. This tour was very successful and Thomas fell in love with America, a romance that would bring his end just more than three years later. "This first lecture tour of three months was a roaring success, or roaring and a success" (Sinclair, 166). Thomas gave great lectures on this tour, but more impor ...
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  • Edger Allen Poe - 1,314 words
    Edger Allen Poe Edger Alan Poe Edgar Alan Poe was an American writer, known as a poet and most famous as the first master of the short story, especially tales of the mysterious and macabre. The literary merits of Poe's writings have been debated since his death, but his works have remained popular and many major American and European writers have professed their artistic debt to him. Born in Boston Massachusetts, Poe was orphaned in his early child hood. Raised by John Adam, A successful businessman of Richmond, Virginia. Taken by the Allan Family to England, at the age of six, Poe was placed in a private school upon returning to the US in 1820, he continued to study in private school. He at ...
    Related: allen, edger, psychological analysis, virginia clemm, mysterious
  • Elizabeth - 540 words
    Elizabeth Bishop Why Elizabeth Bishop was Considered to be Dickonsonian in Her Writing Style Poet Elizabeth Bishop was as simple as she was complex. The lucid and uncomplicated images she created with her seemingly elementary style were anything but; in fact, the complexity that resides within her characteristically simple prose, which demonstrate a purity and precision like no other, are known only to those who can see beyond their faзade. Attention to outer detail and an unquenchable desire to portray her inner pain, Bishop favored a more simplistic approach to convey the immense pain and suffering she endured throughout her life. Utilizing the concepts of surrealism and imagery, as ...
    Related: elizabeth, american poets, new england, writing style, punctuation
  • Emily Dickinson - 1,611 words
    Emily Dickinson Throughout the history of literature, it has often been said that "the poet is the poetry" (Tate, Reactionary 9); that a poets life and experiences greatly influence the style and the content of their writing, some more than others. Emily Dickinson is one of the most renowned poets of her time, recognized for the amount of genuine, emotional insight into life, death, and love she was able to show through her poetry. Many believe her lifestyle and solitude brought her to that point in her writing. During Emily Dickinsons life, she suffered many experiences that eventually sent her into seclusion, and those events, along with her reclusiveness, had a great impact on her poetry. ...
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  • Guston - 606 words
    Guston Guston had three distinct phases or styles during his artistic career, all of them remarkably successful. After first working as a muralist in a relatively realistic style, he became prominent in the late 1940s and early 1950s as part of the abstract expressionism movement. Beginning in the late 1960s, his late period of clunky, expressive paintings of the human form marked the start of a revolt against the abstract style that had dominated American painting since the early 1950s. Born Philip Goldstein in Montreal, Canada, Guston moved with his Russian-Jewish emigr parents to Los Angeles, California in 1919. His father committed suicide in 1920. In 1927 Guston attended Manual Arts Hig ...
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  • Gwendolyn Brooks - 1,513 words
    Gwendolyn Brooks On June 7, 1917, Keziah Corine Wims and David Anderson Brooks gave birth to one of the most gifted African-American poets of the 20th century. They named her Gwendolyn Brooks. Although she was born in Topeka, Kansas, Brooks grew up in Chicago where her mother worked as a schoolteacher and her father worked as a janitor. He quit going to school for financial reasons and while quitting went away his dream of becoming a doctor. David Brooks was still a proud man. Being a janitor wasnt, and still isnt considered a highly skilled job, but Brooks was still proud of her fathers self-sacrifice. Brooks wrote a poem directly titled In Honor of David Anderson Brooks, My Father. In this ...
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  • Incident By Countee Cullen - 361 words
    Incident By Countee Cullen "Incident" Countee Cullen wrote the poem "Incident". He was born May 30, 1903. Growing up he was a very bright kid who liked to wright poetry. Cullen was very good in school and always finished with honors. His love for poetry had its break through while attending New York university. His poems were published in American Literary Magazines before he graduated. He later became to be one of the great American Poets. The poem the "Incident was about A young boys experience while visiting Baltimore. The poem goes on to say that the boy is walking a long enjoying the day. Then a guy walking by changes the whole mood of the poem by calling the boy a racist comment. The b ...
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  • Langston Hughes - 1,003 words
    Langston Hughes As a talented American author, Langston Hughes captured and integrated the realities and demands of Africa America in his work by utilizing the beauty, dignity, and heritage of blacks in America in the 1920s. Hughes was reared for a time by his grandmother in Kansas after his parents divorce. Influenced by the poetry of Paul Laurence Dunbar and Carl Sandburg, he began writing creatively while still a boy. Not only did Hughes suffer from poverty but also from restrictions that came with living in a segregated community. While he attended an integrated school, he was not permitted to play team sports or join the Boy Scouts. Even his favorite movie theater put a sign that read N ...
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  • Langston Hughes As Social Person - 1,314 words
    Langston Hughes As Social Person Langston Hughes is considered by many readers to be the most significant black poet of the twentieth century. He is described as і...the beloved author of poems steeped in the richness of African American culture, poems that exude Hughes№s affection for black Americans across all divisions of region, class, and gender.І (Rampersad 3) His writing was both depressing and uplifting at times. His poetry, spanning five decades from 1926 to 1967, reflected the changing black experience in America, from the Harlem Renaissance to the turbulent sixties. At the beginning of his career, he was surrounded by the Harlem Renaissance. New York City in the ...
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  • Leaves Of Grass By Walt Whitman - 1,536 words
    Leaves Of Grass By Walt Whitman In the twentieth century, the name Walt Whitman has been synonymous with poetry. Whitmans most celebrated work, Leaves of Grass, was the only book he ever wrote, and he took a lifetime to write it. A large assortment of poems, it is one of the most widely criticized works in literature, and one of the most loved works as well. Whitman was unmarried and childless, and it has been noted that Leaves of Grass consumed him greatly; James E. Miller Jr. writes: "...he guided his poetic offspring through an uncertain, hesitant childhood, a lusty young manhood, and a serene old age...it is difficult to write the life of Whitman without writing instead of the life and t ...
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  • Life After Death Robert Frost And Emily Dickinson - 838 words
    Life After Death - Robert Frost And Emily Dickinson Life After Death Robert Frost and Emily Dickinson are two Modern American Poets who consistently wrote about the theme of death. While there are some comparisons between the two poets, when it comes to death as a theme, their writing styles were quite different. Robert Frosts poem, Home Burial, and Emily Dickinsons poems, I felt a Funeral in my Brain, and I died for Beauty, are three poems concerning death. While the theme is constant there are differences as well as similarities between the poets and their poems. The obvious comparison between the three poems is the theme of death. Both poets, in these works and many others, display a fasc ...
    Related: dickinson, emily, emily dickinson, frost, life after death, robert frost
  • Rebel Poets Of 1950s - 1,826 words
    Rebel Poets Of 1950S Rebel Poets of the 1950s America demands a poetry that is bold, modern and all-surrounding and kosmical, as she is herself. Although Walt Whitman wrote that prescription shortly after the Civil War, it also vividly describes the generation of American poets who came of age after World War II. Particularly during moments of cultural change, poets have joined artists on the front lines of expanding consciousness by forging a vernacular language that gives expression to contemporary life. One such shift in poetry occurred at the time of World War I, and another major shift took place during the decade after the Second World War. The 1950s are stereotypically represented as ...
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  • Robert Frost - 1,656 words
    Robert Frost Robert Frost is one of the few twentieth century poets to receive critical acclaim and popular acceptance (Magill 728). His simplistic style appeals to the novice and expert poetry reader alike. Robert Frost's understated emotional appeal attracts readers of all literary levels. Frost develops subtly stated emotions and a clever use of imagery in his poetry. Influences on his poetry include his family, work, and other life experiences (Oxford 267). Frost also works to develop iambic pentameter using simple language, in an attempt to effectively portray the New England lifestyle (Magill 723). Frost successfully blends classic poetry and a modern simplicity to create a new generat ...
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  • Robert Frost Paper - 604 words
    Robert Frost Paper Robert Forst was perhaps one of the most popular and beloved of twentieth century American poets. In many ways his work is related to nature and his New England surroundings. To Frost, Nature is a source of wisdom as well as a source of joy. He was born in San Fransisco, and moved to massachusetts at age 11. He later attended Dartmouth, and Harvard, both of which he dropped out of. Once he married, he lived on a thirty-acre farm with orchards, fields, pastured, woodlands, and springs. Farming always produced enough food for his family but they never had enough money. Robert lived here for around twelve years. At age 39 he moved to England where he published a collection of ...
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  • The Impressionistic Period - 338 words
    The Impressionistic Period THE IMPRESSIONISTIC PERIOD The Impressionistic Period took place during the latter half of the 19th century and the beginning half of the 20th century. Impressionistic music was first started by Claude Debussy, a French composer. He also founded the impressionist school of music. The Impressionistic Period started as a revolt against German romanticism. The influence of the French impressionist paintings also helped form this style of music. Debussys music was brief, elegant, and rather cold, unlike the period before, which held sentimental music. At one point in his life, he broke away and composed a piece which was more conventional, called La Mer, which means th ...
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  • The Life And Death Of Edgar Allan Poe - 1,920 words
    The Life And Death Of Edgar Allan Poe Table of Contents Introduction ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 Early Life ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 Time at the University ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .4 1827-1829 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 5 The Army (1827-1829 continued) ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 7 Reconciliation With John Allan (1827-1829 continued) ... ... ... ..8 Fanny Allan's Death (1827-1829 continued) ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 9 Less Happiness and More Writing ... ... ...
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  • The Rich Man - 855 words
    The Rich Man The Rich Man Franklin P. Adams is one of the less known American modern poets. His poems, like the poems of many other 20th century American poets, comment the society after the industrial revolution. Adams poem, The Rich Man, concentrates on the class division between the rich and the poor. Furthermore it satirizes the old view of an impecunious life being the good and the virtuous one. The two first stanzas of the poem are description about the rich man. The fact that he is called the rich man hints that the speaker him/herself is poor. The first stanza concentrates on describing the rich mans belongings. The first thing the reader finds out the rich man has is a motor-car, no ...
    Related: industrial revolution, american poets, albert camus, cheek, explanation
  • The Somber Dance - 1,058 words
    The Somber Dance The Somber Dance Theodore Roethke, poet and author, has contributed many well-known pieces to American literature. Roethke wrote close to 200 notebooks worth of poems. Only three percent of the poems in his notebooks were actually published. Most pieces, well-known to the public, are collections of poems such as The Waking, which he won a Pulitzer prize for in the mid 1950s. The Lost Son and Open House are two other collections pieces of Roethke. A couple novels also helped this aspiring author and poet achieve his status among literature; Words for the Wind and The Far Field. All of the works just mentioned were not achieved by Roethke until he was well into his late 20s. A ...
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  • Walter Whitman - 1,695 words
    Walter Whitman Walter Whitman Through the history of the United States there have been a countless numbers of poets. With them came an equal number of writing styles. Certainly one of the most unique poets to write life's story through his own view of the world and with the ambition to do it was Walter Whitman. Greatly criticized by many readers of his work, Whitman was not a man to be deterred. Soon he would show the world that he had a voice, and that it spoke with a poet's words. Afoot and lighthearted I take to the open road, Healthy, free, the world before me, the long brown path before me leading wherever I choose. Thus Whitman began his "Song of the Open Road". This paper will attempt ...
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