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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: american novel

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  • Alice Walker 2 - 1,088 words
    Alice Walker 2 There are many different types of authors in the world of literature, authors of horror, romance, suspense, and the type that Alice Walker writes, through personal experiences. Although most critics categorize her writings as feminist, Walker describes herself as a "womanist", she defines this as "a woman who loves other woman...Appreciates and prefers woman culture, woman's emotional flexibility... and woman's strength... Loves the spirit... Loves herself, Regardless". Walker's thoughts and feelings show through in her writing of poetry and novels. Alice Walker writes through her feelings and the morals that she has grown with, she writes about the black woman's struggle for ...
    Related: alice, alice walker, walker, black woman, the color purple
  • America Land Of The Free And Home Of The Brave The Utopian Society Which Every European Citizen Desired To Be A Part Of In Th - 3,033 words
    America... land of the free and home of the brave; the utopian society which every European citizen desired to be a part of in the 18th and 19th centuries. The revolutionary ideas of The Age of Enlightenment such as democracy and universal male suffrage were finally becoming a reality to the philosophers and scholars that so elegantly dreamt of them. America was a playground for the ideas of these enlightened men. To Europeans, and the world for that matter, America had become a kind of mirage, an idealistic version of society, a place of open opportunities. Where else on earth could a man like J. D. Rockefeller rise from the streets to one of the richest men of his time? America stood for i ...
    Related: america, brave, century america, citizen, southern society, utopian, utopian society
  • Catch 22 And Good As Gold Satire - 1,233 words
    ... ony throughout both novels in titles and characters in order to satirize. Throughout Catch-22 Heller discusses the theme of reality and appearance. He also discusses the difference between what is said and what is real. This leads to Hellers irony. The best example of this theme of reality is when Colonel Catchart is discussing whether to punish Yossarian or give him a medal (Peek 21). Dr. Peek also believes that the novel juxtaposes scenes in order to great a "ironic perspective" (Peek 10). In both Good as Gold and Catch-22 Heller names the books ironically. The title of Catch-22 is very ironic because the definition of Catch-22 is that in order to be removed from duty you must be insan ...
    Related: catch, catch 22, satire, cliff notes, record keeping
  • Cather In The Rye Language - 1,455 words
    Cather in the Rye - Language The passage of adolescence has served as the central theme for many novels, but J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye, long a staple in academic lesson plans, has captured the spirit of this stage of life in hyper-sensitive form, dramatizing Holden Caulfield's vulgar language and melodramatic reactions. Written as the autobiographical account of a fictional teenage prep school student Holden Caulfield, The Catcher in the Rye deals with material that is socially scandalous for the times (Gwynn, 1958). As an emotional, intelligent, inquisitive, and painfully sensitive young man, Holden puts his inner world to the test through the sexual mores of his peers and elde ...
    Related: body language, cather, york cambridge university, first instance, conversational
  • Grapes Of Wrath By Steinbeck - 420 words
    Grapes Of Wrath By Steinbeck The novel Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck, illustrates the hardships of the common man in great detail. The one aspect of this book that displays life as it exists in the hostile real-world is the third chapter, in which the human plight is displayed by a turtle, and his struggle to reach the other side of a road. As the turtle is about to reach his goal, it is returned to it's original location, but it does not waver in it's determination, and continues across the road until it reaches the other side. The characters most easily identified with in this book are the Joad family, and Jim Casy. Each character undergoes tremendous heartache and burden, yet they sta ...
    Related: grapes of wrath, john steinbeck, steinbeck, wrath, american novel
  • Hemingway Protagonist Soldiers Home - 1,139 words
    Hemingway Protagonist - Soldier's Home Various authors, through years of discipline, develop their own style in creating characters. Ernest Hemingway varied his style by establishing an indestructible template for pressing characters into molded protagonists. This "template" protagonist follows a unique set of standards unlike any other character, produced by any other author. In his literary work "Soldier's Home", Hemingway creates the character Krebs to abide by this set of standards. By working within the circumstances presented to him, Krebs fits the mold of a typical Hemingway protagonist by overcoming his disillusions through heroic actions. To begin with, Krebs returns home from World ...
    Related: ernest hemingway, hemingway, protagonist, soldiers home, literary works
  • Huck Finn And Jungian Collective Consciousness Unfinished - 1,011 words
    Huck Finn and Jungian Collective Consciousness (unfinished) Rachel McKinney, denim Rachs Huck Finn Paper Is Huck Finn a hero in the classical sense (i.e. Aeneas, Prometheus, Jason, etc., as well as analogous heroes from other cultures)? How does The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn both comform and deviate from Jungs macro-myth archetype? Mark Twains story The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is heralded as the "first great American novel," and has been read by generations upon generations, and translated into almost every written language. While the universal appeal of the book can be taken as a testament to Twains talent as a writer, the novel is so widely accepted for a broader reason: its f ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, collective, consciousness, finn, huck, huck finn, huckleberry finn
  • Immigration Reform - 477 words
    Immigration Reform James Fenimore Cooper was born in Burlington, New Jersey on September 15, 1789. He was the eleventh of twelve children born to William and Elizabeth Cooper. When James was one year old the family moved to the frontier, and his father established the settlement of Cooperstown at the head of the Susquehanna River.Cooper attended a private preparatory school at Albany, New York, and was then admitted to Yale in 1803. He was expelled during his junior year because of a prank. His family allowed him to join the navy as a midshipman, but he soon found that more discipline was present in the Navy than at Yale. In 1810 Cooper took a furlough, and never returned to active duty. Coo ...
    Related: immigration, immigration reform, reform, walter scott, american life
  • Of Mice And Men Theme - 1,077 words
    Of Mice And Men Theme First published in 1937, Of Mice and Men is a classic American novel by John Steinbeck. George and Lennie are two ranch hands that travel together, with George watching over the mentally inferior Lennie. When they start work at a new ranch, several different characters are introduced. One affliction that seems to face several characters is loneliness, created by factors such as the characters lifestyles and by social standards of the time period. Steinbecks theme that loneliness is unhealthy and dangerous to a persons well being is emphasized throughout the novel. This underlying theme is first introduced in the novel when George talks to Lennie about the advantage they ...
    Related: mice, of mice and men, american novel, john steinbeck, travel
  • Supertramp - 999 words
    Supertramp Into the wild is more morbidly fascinating than anything else. It is a journey into the psyche of a young man who, with seemingly all of the advantages that late Twentieth Century America can arm one with, decides to disappear into the flotsam of the country playing the part of an enlightened hobo (he takes the moniker 'Supertramp' as a way to christen his new identity). When I read I this book I was infuriated with Chris McCandless. It is normal to want to create a reality where it is you versus them. Who wants to work forty plus hours a week for a boss who would just as soon fire you so that he or she could keep their indoor pool heated during the winter? Who would want that rea ...
    Related: century america, roughing it, middle class, winter, amazing
  • The Great Gatsby - 1,051 words
    The Great Gatsby The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, has been celebrated as one of the greatest, if not the greatest American novel. Yet this is ironic for the society which has so hailed the book is precisely that which is criticized throughout it. Politically, the American dream was a foundation of ideals and hopes for any and every American individual. Specifically, one of the ideals was an American dream free of class distinction; that every person has the opportunity to be whomever they hope to be. In a sort of Cinderella-like fashion, it is in essence an ideal of social mobility and freedom. The social reality, however, is far more cruel. Because of the harsh truth of social Amer ...
    Related: gatsby, great gatsby, jay gatsby, the great gatsby, american ideal
  • The Great Gatsby - 1,784 words
    The Great Gatsby Life, like The great Gatsby Imagine that you live in the nineteen twenties, and that you are a very wealthy man that lives by himself in a manchine, on a lake and who throws parties every weekend. This is just the beginning of how to explain the way Jay Gatsby lived his life. This novel, by F. Scott, Fitzgerald is one that is very deep in thought. Fitzgerald releases little clues along the way of the novel that will be crusual to understand the ending. For instance, he makes the blue coupe a very important clue, as well as the Dr. T. J. Eckleburg eyes on the billboard that Mr. Wilson (the gas station attendant ) refers to as the eyes of god. There are also other little thing ...
    Related: gatsby, great gatsby, jay gatsby, the great gatsby, american short story
  • The Great Gatsby Book Report - 1,610 words
    ... placed them so that he would not have servants telling the entire town about his private affairs. The next day Gatsby called Nick on the phone. At Daisys request, Nick was invited to her house for tea with Jordan and Gatsby the next day. That day was the hottest of the summer, and Gatsby and Nick waited before the butler led them into the salon where Jordan and Daisy reclined and Tom rushed in and out answering phone calls and getting drinks. After much tension, the group decided to go into New York. Daisy and Gatsby went in Toms car and Tom, Jordan, and Nick went in Gatsbys car. Tom had to stop for gas at Wilsons garage. Wilson informed Tom that he was taking his wife out west and that ...
    Related: book report, gatsby, great american, great gatsby, the great gatsby
  • The Language Of Cather In The Rye - 1,467 words
    The Language of Cather in the Rye Catcher in the Rye The Language of Cather in the Rye The passage of adolescence has served as the central theme for many novels, but J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye, long a staple in academic lesson plans, has captured the spirit of this stage of life in hyper-sensitive form, dramatizing Holden Caulfield's vulgar language and melodramatic reactions. Written as the autobiographical account of a fictional teenage prep school student Holden Caulfield, The Catcher in the Rye deals with material that is socially scandalous for the times (Gwynn, 1958). As an emotional, intelligent, inquisitive, and painfully sensitive young man, Holden puts his inner world ...
    Related: body language, cather, york times, central theme, habit
  • Themes Relating To Good Versus Evil In Billy Budd - 1,955 words
    Themes Relating to Good Versus Evil in Billy Budd Many themes relating to the conflict between Good and Evil can be found in Herman Melville's novella Billy Budd, Foretopman. First originating as a poem about a middle-aged man on the eve of his execution, Billy Budd is the only true work of fiction written by Melville (Bloom, Critical Views 198). The idea for the novella was probably suggested in part by an incident in 1842 in which a midshipman and two seamen of the American brig Somers were hanged at sea for mutiny (Voss 44). Although it remained unpublished for until almost half a century after Melville's death, Billy Budd quickly became one of his most popular works (Bloom, Critical View ...
    Related: billy, billy budd, budd, good and evil, relating, versus
  • Two American Dreams - 1,091 words
    ... Gatsby, Daisy, Nick, and Jordan Baker, are at a hotel in New York holding a conversation which breaks out into an argument. It is during this argument that Tom finds out that Jay Gatsby and Daisy have been in love for five years and that they have never stopped loving each other. As Tom and Gatsby argue it becomes evident that Daisy does not know which man she wants to be with because she is in love with both of them because both of them are rich. All Gatsby wanted was for Daisy to tell Tom that she never loved him, but she could not do that. She knew that it would be a lie if she said that so she simply said to Gatsby, I did love him once- but I loved you too. This statement opens the w ...
    Related: american, american dream, american novel, american world, dreams
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